Conservative Down – Yet Another Con faces Criminal Charges

So far this week we have seen one Republican Governor indicted in Va for taking bribes…

A Republican Governor in New Jersey under Federal investigation, in what started as a case of political payback, and has now expanded to corruption charges, and even meetings with a purported Mafia Capo…

And now, one of the formerly shining voices of the right, Dines D’Souza being indicted for election fraud.

I mean…It’s only January, and you have two guys formerly touted as potential Presidential material, and a highly influential voice on the Christian Right potentially looking at jail time.

How bad is it? You even have Glen Beck apologizing!

This should be a TV reality show.

The latest conservative icon to face charges is Dinesh D’Souza. Author of “Illiberal Education“, the controversial “The End of Racism“, and the Anti-Obama hate Movie

2016: Obama’s America” which was a major hit with the racist conservative sector.

Dinesh D’Souza’s Series of Unfortunate Events

Author and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza was indicted for encouraging fraudulent campaign donations—just the latest in a spiral that has all but sunk his career in the conservative movement.

Conservative author, filmmaker and provocateur Dinesh D’Souza was indicted Thursday on charges of using straw donors to make illegal contributions to a college classmate’s 2012 campaign.

The indictment, filed in U.S. District Court in New York, accuses D’Souza of “willfully and knowingly” surpassing the $5,000 limit for individual campaign donations by directing others to donate to the campaign of Wendy Long, who unsuccessfully challenged New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand in 2012. According to the document, D’Souza and his then-wife, Dixie, each contributed $5,000 to Long’s campaign, and he reimbursed others for $20,000 he had encouraged them to donate.

D’Souza worked with Long on the infamousDartmouth Review, an edgy conservative newspaper at Dartmouth College known for launching smart young right-wingers to prominence. In 1990, the pairapologized for printing an anti-Semitic quote from Hitler’s Mein Kampf in an edition of the publication distributed on Yom Kippur—an antic typical of theReview’s ethos of deliberate provocation. Long went on to become an attorney at several conservative institutions, including the Claremont Institute. She made her first run for office in 2012, and lost in a landslide to Gillibrand, New York’s incumbent Democratic senator.

According to the New York Times], Long raised about $785,000 in the race, with D’Souza hosting one of her fundraisers. D’Souza’s lawyer denied any criminal intent in the apparent plot to reimburse donors to Long’s campaign, saying it was “at most … an act of misguided friendship.”

The indictment is just the latest in a tangle of personal and professional difficulties that swarmed around D’Souza at what was arguably the height of his success: the popularity of his 2012 anti-Obama documentary 2016: Obama’s America. The film, which was released in the summer of 2012 and became a slow-burn hit with conservatives in the run-up to the presidential election, earned over $33 million at the box office and was the highest-grossing documentary since 1982. But just a couple of months into the film’s promotion, D’Souza was out of a job: he resigned his lucrative position as president of the King’s College, a small evangelical Christian school in Manhattan, over reportsthat he was engaged to a 29-year-old woman while still being married to his wife of 20 years.

D’Souza’s departure from the King’s College was the symbolic end of his career in the institutional conservative movement, which had grown increasingly exasperated with his string of conspiratorial books that failed to live up to his reputation as a star of conservative scholarship. (One advanced the notion that America’s moral decadence led to 9/11; another launched the meme, which has long since become a political punch line, that Obama was a “Kenyan anti-colonialist.”) D’Souza’s tenure at the King’s College was fraught with conflict, as some faculty members viewed him as a name-brand hire who lacked appropriate academic credentials and who was more interested in his own money-making projects than in fundraising for the college.

The conflict came to a head in October, when the evangelical magazine Worldalleged that D’Souza had shared a hotel room with Denise Odie Joseph, a young woman who had written a fawning blog about about him, and introduced her as his fiancée despite still being married. The college had apparently been aware of D’Souza’s marital problems, but decided to end its relationship with him once news of the scandal engulfed the school.

Despite that flameout, D’Souza’s prospects seemed as bright as ever: his wildly successful documentary was one of the most profitable projects of his career, at least since his hagiographic biography of Ronald Reagan was published in 1999. D’Souza had discovered the lucrative business of hitting the sweet spots of the conservative movement with a mixture of Christian apologetics, celebration of conservative heroes, and paranoid attacks on liberals. Even if it was unlikely he would continue to be given quasi-scholarly positions in conservative institutions, the financial prospects of political propagandizing had never looked better.

But even the glow of his documentary’s success was interrupted by legal headaches. While the King’s College scandal was erupting, D’Souza was sued by Douglas Sain, the producer of 2016: Obama’s America. Sain alleged that D’Souza had mismanaged funds from the movie and kept his partners out of crucial decisions about the film’s marketing and distribution. A judge eventually threw out the suit, concluding that the charges “lacked specificity.”

D’Souza was last seen in an informercial for a friend’s artificial Christmas tree

The Biggest Ghetto in America

Conservatives – especially their Lawn Jockey black conservative servants, like to talk about black folks and the inner city. It, like almost everything conservatives have to say is a lie – a flim flam game.Since I was hammering the Wall Street Journal’s professional Uncle Tom, Jason Riley a few posts ago - let’s use one of his buckdances for his WSJ Massa’s as an example -

Liberals in general, and the black left in particular, like the idea of talking about racial problems, but in practice they typically ignore the most relevant aspects of any such discussion. Any candid debate on race and criminality in this country would have to start with the fact that blacks commit an astoundingly disproportionate number of crimes. African-Americans constitute about 13% of the population, yet between 1976 and 2005 blacks committed more than half of all murders in the U.S. The black arrest rate for most offenses—including robbery, aggravated assault and property crimes—is typically two to three times their representation in the population.

“High rates of black violence in the late twentieth century are a matter of historical fact, not bigoted imagination,” wrote the late Harvard Law professor William Stuntz in “The Collapse of American Criminal Justice.” “The trends reached their peak not in the land of Jim Crow but in the more civilized North, and not in the age of segregation but in the decades that saw the rise of civil rights for African Americans—and of African American control of city governments.”

The left wants to blame these outcomes on racial animus and “the system,” but blacks have long been part of running that system. Black crime and incarceration rates spiked in the 1970s and ’80s in cities such as Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago and Philadelphia, under black mayors and black police chiefs. Some of the most violent cities in the U.S. today are run by blacks.

One more time for the Lawn Jockey set – the issue is POVERTY, not black folks, not white folks,not cities..The issue buckdancers is POVERTY.

The White Ghetto

There are lots of diversions in the Big White Ghetto, the vast moribund matrix of Wonder Bread–hued Appalachian towns and villages stretching from northern Mississippi to southern New York, a slowly dissipating nebula of poverty and misery with its heart in eastern Kentucky, the last redoubt of the Scots-Irish working class that picked up where African slave labor left off, mining and cropping and sawing the raw materials for a modern American economy that would soon run out of profitable uses for the class of people who 500 years ago would have been known, without any derogation, as peasants. Thinking about the future here and its bleak prospects is not much fun at all, so instead of too much black-minded introspection you have the pills and the dope, the morning beers, the endless scratch-off lotto cards, healing meetings up on the hill, the federally funded ritual of trading cases of food-stamp Pepsi for packs of Kentucky’s Best cigarettes and good old hard currency, tall piles of gas-station nachos, the occasional blast of meth, Narcotics Anonymous meetings, petty crime, the draw, the recreational making and surgical unmaking of teenaged mothers, and death: Life expectancies are short — the typical man here dies well over a decade earlier than does a man in Fairfax County, Va. — and they are getting shorter, women’s life expectancy having declined by nearly 1.1 percent from 1987 to 2007.

If the people here weren’t 98.5 percent white, we’d call it a reservation.

Driving through these hills and hollows, you aren’t in the Appalachia of Elmore Leonard’s Justified or squatting with Lyndon Johnson on Tom Fletcher’s front porch in Martin County, a scene famously photographed by Walter Bennett of Time, the image that launched the so-called War on Poverty. The music isn’t “Shady Grove,” it’s Kanye West. There is still coal mining — which, at $25 an hour or more, provides one of the more desirable occupations outside of government work — but the jobs are moving west, and Harlan County, like many coal-country communities, has lost nearly half of its population over the past 30 years.

There is here a strain of fervid and sometimes apocalyptic Christianity, and visions of the Rapture must have a certain appeal for people who already have been left behind. Like its black urban counterparts, the Big White Ghetto suffers from a whole trainload of social problems, but the most significant among them may be adverse selection: Those who have the required work skills, the academic ability, or the simple desperate native enterprising grit to do so get the hell out as fast as they can, and they have been doing that for decades. As they go, businesses disappear, institutions fall into decline, social networks erode, and there is little or nothing left over for those who remain. It’s a classic economic death spiral: The quality of the available jobs is not enough to keep good workers, and the quality of the available workers is not enough to attract good jobs. These little towns located at remote wide spots in helical mountain roads are hard enough to get to if you have a good reason to be here. If you don’t have a good reason, you aren’t going to think of one.

Appalachian places have evocative and unsentimental names denoting deep roots: Little Barren River, Coal Pit Road. The name “Cumberland” blankets Appalachian geography — the Cumberland Mountains, the Cumberland River, several Cumberland counties — in tribute to the Duke of Cumberland, who along with the Ulster Scots ancestors of the Appalachian settlers crushed the Young Pretender at the Battle of Culloden. Even church names suggest ancient grievances: Separate Baptist, with the descriptor in all-capital letters. (“Come out from among them and be ye separate” — 2 Corinthians 6:17.) I pass a church called “Welfare Baptist,” which, unfortunately, describes much of the population for miles and miles around. Continue reading

The WSJ’s Uncle Tom, Jason Riley

When I was a young man starting out in business, reading the Wall Street Journal was a requirement for those who wanted to be savvy about the business world. In the passenger lounges in airports or the train station legions of folks read the paper daily on their commute. The quality of the articles, insights, and writing was incredible…

Then something happened. That something was the acquisition of the paper by right wing media mogul Rupert Murdoch…

The paper sold out to conservative clowns, and reading it became akin to skinny dipping in a sewer. Much like when well known and respected product manufacturers sell out to mass marketers who wish to profit from their name to sell cheap, low quality goods…The WSJ  became Breitbart with a historically respected and legitimate name.

One of the requirements of any conservative rag is to have their very own, in house Uncle Tom to deflect from the racist mouthings and utterances of their white “reporters”.

Jason Riley’s foray into self prostitution made him the WSJ’s boy.

“I think there’s a pattern at MSNBC of them hiring Black mediocrities like Melissa Harris-Perry, Michael Eric Dyson, Touré, and, of course — the granddaddy of them all — Al Sharpton, simply to race-bait,”Wall Street Journal’s said on WSJ’s Political Diary program.

So… I got curious. From what pedestal of accomplishment does Uncle Jason base his utterings? So I looked up the bios…

Jason Riley

Editorial board member, The Wall Street Journal.

Jason Riley is a member of The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board. He joined the paper in 1994 as a copyreader on the national news desk in New York. He moved to the editorial page in 1995 as copyreader and later became a copy editor. In April 1996, he was named to the newly created position of editorial interactive editor and maintained the editorial and Leisure & Arts section of WSJ.com. He was named a senior editorial page writer in March 2000, and member of the Editorial Board in 2005.

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mr. Riley earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has also worked for USA Today and the Buffalo News.

Melissa V. Harris-Perry

is host of MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry.” The show airs on Saturdays and Sundays from 10AM to noon ET.

Harris-Perry is also professor of political science at Tulane University, where she is founding director of the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South. She previously served on the faculties of the University of Chicago and Princeton University.

Harris-Perry is author of the well received book, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America(Yale 2011) which argues that persistent harmful stereotypes-invisible to many but painfully familiar to black women-profoundly shape black women’s politics, contribute to policies that treat them unfairly, and make it difficult for black women to assert their rights in the political arena.

Her first book, Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought, won the 2005 W. E. B. Du Bois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and 2005 Best Book Award from the Race and Ethnic Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.

Professor Harris-Perry is a columnist for The Nation magazine, where she writes a monthly column also titled Sister Citizen. In addition to hosting her own show on MSNBC she provides expert commentary on U.S. elections, racial issues, religious questions and gender concerns for a variety of other media outlets.

Her academic research is inspired by a desire to investigate the challenges facing contemporary black Americans and to better understand the multiple, creative ways that African Americans respond to these challenges. Her work is published in scholarly journals and edited volumes and her interests include the study of African American political thought, black religious ideas and practice, and social and clinical psychology.

Professor Harris-Perry’s creative and dynamic teaching is also motivated by the practical political and racial issues of our time. Professor Harris-Perry has taught students from grade school to graduate school and has been recognized for her commitment to the classroom as a site of democratic deliberation on race.

She travels extensively speaking to colleges, organizations and businesses in the United States and abroad. In 2009 Professor Harris-Perry became the youngest scholar to deliver the W.E.B. Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. Also in 2009 she delivered the prestigious Ware Lecture, becoming the youngest woman to ever do so.

Professor Harris-Perry received her B.A. in English from Wake Forest University, her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University and an honorary doctorate from Meadville Lombard Theological School. And she studied theology at Union Theological Seminary in New York. She lives in New Orleans with her husband, James Perry, and is the mother of a terrific daughter, Parker.

Professor Harris-Perry also sits on the advisory board for “Chef’s Move!”, a program whose mission is to diversify kitchen management by providing training, experience and mentorship to minority applicants from New Orleans, sending them to New York City for culinary school training and then bringing them back again to become leaders in the kitchen and in their community.

Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson (born October 23, 1958) is an American academic, author, and radio host. He is a professor of sociology at Georgetown University.[2] Described by Michael A. Fletcher as “a Princeton PhD and a child of the streets who takes pains never to separate the two”,[3] Dyson has authored and edited 18 books dealing with subjects such as Malcolm XMartin Luther King, Jr.Marvin GayeNas’s debut album IllmaticBill CosbyTupac Shakur and Hurricane Katrina.

Dyson was born to Everett and Addie Dyson in Detroit, Michigan. He attended Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan on an academic scholarship but left and completed his education at Northwestern High School.[3] He became an ordainedBaptistminister at 19 years of age.[4]Having worked in factories in Detroit to support his family, he entered Knoxville College as a freshman at age 21.[5] Dyson received his bachelor’s degreemagna cum laude, from Carson–Newman College in 1985.[3] He obtained his master’s and Ph.D in religion, from Princeton University. Dyson serves on the board of directors of the Common Ground Foundation, a project dedicated to empowering urban youth in the United States

Dyson has taught at Chicago Theological SeminaryBrown University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel HillColumbia UniversityDePaul University, and the University of Pennsylvania.[3] Since 2007, he has been a Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University. His 1994 bookMaking Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X became a New York Times notable book of the year.[9] In his 2006 book Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster, Dyson analyzes the political and social events in the wake of the catastrophe against the backdrop of an overall “failure in race and class relations”.[10][11][12] In 2010, Dyson edited Born to Use Mics: Reading Nas’s Illmatic, with contributions based on the album’s tracks by, among others, Kevin Coval, Kyra D. Gaunt (“Professor G”), dream hamptonMarc Lamont HillAdam Mansbach, and Mark Anthony Neal.[13] Dyson’s own essay in this anthology, “One Love,” Two Brothers, Three Verses, explains how the current US penal system disfavors young black males more than any other segment of the population.[14][15] Dyson hosted a radio show, which aired on Radio One, from January 2006 to February 2007. He was also a commentator on National Public Radio and CNN, and is a regular guest on Real Time with Bill Maher. Beginning July 2011 Michael Eric Dyson became a political analyst for MSNBC.

Touré

Touré (born Touré Neblett; March 20, 1971) is an American writer, music journalistcultural critic, and television personality. He is the host ofFuse‘s Hiphop Shop and On the Record and co-host of The Cycle on MSNBC. He was also a contributor to MSNBC‘s The Dylan Ratigan Show and serves on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominating Committee. He teaches a course on the history of hip hop at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, part of the Tisch School of the Arts in New York.

Touré is the author of several books, including The Portable Promised Land (2003), Soul City (2004), Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now (2011), and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon (2013).

While a student at Emory University, Touré founded the school’s black student newspaper, The Fire This Time,[7] which has been criticized for being militantly anti-white.[8][9]The Daily Caller took issue with the fact that the publication only solicited donations from blacks, and that its articles praised noted anti-Semitesblack supremacists, and conspiracy theorists such as H. Rap Brownand Frances Cress Welsing, whom Touré invited to Emory’s campus. The Caller also criticized Touré’s use of a hoaxed hate crime at Emory as a rationale for a list of demands against the university, even after the crime’s ostensible target, Sabrina Collins, admitted that her accusations were a hoax of her creation. Touré defended The Fire This Time as “an important black voice on campus” and “a form of community building.”[8][9]

Touré began his career as a music journalist, contributing articles to Rolling Stone,[10][11][2][12]The New Yorker,[volume & issue needed]The New York Times Magazine,[volume & issue needed]Playboy,[volume & issue needed]The Village Voice,[volume & issue needed]Vibe,[volume & issue needed] and Essence magazine.[volume & issue needed]

His Rolling Stone article about Dale Earnhardt Jr., “Kurt is My Co-Pilot”, was included in The Best American Sports Writing 2001.[12][13]

Touré has written five books, including Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?, a collection of interviews, and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon, a Prince biography.

Now tell me again…Whom is the “mediocrity” here?

Canadian Writer Doesn’t Want to be Black Anymore!

Very disturbed young guy, who is a columnist living in Toronto, Canada…

This one echoes of some of Tommie Sewage’s garbage.

Sadly this poor fool relates being black to being everyone else, letting the outside world define him…Instead of having the self confidence to define himself on his own terms. Being a black man does not mean I can play basketball like Lebron James, throw a football like RG III, act like Denzel, or speak like MLK or President Obama. It does mean I have my own set of accomplishments, perhaps not as grand as some (which is why we admire the Mandelas of the world), my own goals and dreams…

And it doesn’t have a damn thing to do with what anyone else thinks.

This guy, Orville Lloyd Douglas, is a big guy…Some would say fat. Does he hate the stereotypes and negative things about fat guys? Does he not want to be fat anymore?

From his mannerisms, he also might be (quite possibly mistakenly) as gay. With the level of homophobic stereotyping of that community… Maybe he doesn’t want to be gay either.

So, Orville…WTF ARE YOU going to be?

I am going to mis-categorize this one under “Black Conservatives”, because while I have a folder for “Giant Negroes”…

I don’t have one for “Small N…

Why I hate being a black man

Every time I sit on a crowded street car, bus, or subway train in Toronto, I know I will have an empty seat next to me. It’s like a broken record. Sometimes I don’t mind having the extra space, but other times I feel awkward, uncomfortable, and annoyed.

I know I have good hygiene, I dress appropriately, and I mind my own business. However, recently, I finally became cognizant of why people might fear being around me or in close proximity to me: I am a black male. Although Canadian society presents the façade of multiculturalismthe truth is Canada has a serious problem with the issue of race.

I didn’t realize it until my sister said to me:

Orville, people are afraid of you. You are a six foot tall black man with broad shoulders.

My sister is right, people don’t sit next to me on the street car, the subway or on the bus because they are afraid.

The issue of black self-hatred is something I am supposed to pretend does not exist. However, the great French psychiatrist Frantz Fanon wrote about this issue in his ground breaking book Black Skin White Masks in a chapter called “the Lived Experience of the Black Man”. According to Fanon, the black man is viewed in the third person, and he isn’t seen as a three-dimensional human being. The black man internalizes the perspectives of white society and its negative thoughts about blackness affect his psyche. In the chapter, Fanon discusses a white child calling him the “N word” and how he becomes cognizant of how he is different and viewed as someone people should fear.

There is also a fear by some black people that discussing the issue of self-hatred is a sign of weakness. There is a discourse that black people engender: that black is beautiful. But the truth is, the image of blackness is ugly – at least it’s perceived that way. There is nothing special or wonderful about being a black male – it is a life of misery and shame.

The issue of black self-hatred is usually depicted from a female point of view. There are documentaries such as Dark Girls which aired on Oprah’s OWN network earlier this year, in which black women discuss their feelings of self hatred for having dark skin. There are numerous books, articles, documentaries, and essays published by black female writers describing black self-hated. Black women are not afraid to speak out about their self-loathing, yet for some reason, black men are silent about our own contempt for what we are.

A lot of black men don’t want to acknowledge the feelings of disgust we have for ourselves. It is considered emasculating to even admit the existence of such thoughts. I think my own self-hated manifests from the exterior, from the outside world. It is born out of the despair and the unhappiness I see within a lot of young black men.

I can honestly say I hate being a black male. Although black people like to wax poetic about loving their label I hate “being black”. I just don’t fit into a neat category of the stereotypical views people have of black men. In popular culture black men are recognized in three areas: sports, crime, and entertainment. I hate rap music, I hate most sports, and I like listening to rock music such as PJ Harvey, Morrissey, and Tracy Chapman. I have nothing in common with the archetypes about the black male.

There is so much negativity and criminal suspicion associated with being a black male in Toronto. Yet, I don’t have a criminal record, and I certainly don’t associate with criminals. In fact, I abhor violence, and I resent being compared to young black males (or young people of any race) who are lazy, not disciplined, or delinquent. Usually, when black male youth are discussed in Toronto, it is about something going wrong.

Honestly, who would want to be black? Who would want people to be terrified of you and not want to sit next to you on public transportation?

Who would want to have this dark skin, broad nose, large thick lips, and wake up in the morning being despised by the rest of the world?

A lot of the time I feel like my skin color is like my personal prison, something that I have no control over, for I am judged just because of the way I look.

Not discussing the issue doesn’t mean it is going to go away. In fact, by ignoring the issue, it simply lurks underneath the surface. I believe a dialogue about self hatred should be brought to the fore in the public sphere, so that some sort of healing and the development of true non-label based pride can occur.

Of course, I do not want to have these feelings, to have these dark thoughts about being a black man. However, I cannot deny that this is the way I feel. I don’t want to be ashamed of being a black man; I just want to be treated as an individual based on the content of my character, and not just based on the colour of my skin.

Which leaves me with one point to make…

Action Jackson and that Romney Disease

Looks like another case of “Romney disease” in Va for republicans…

E.W. Jackson: ‘Marginalized’ Voters Will Help Lead To ‘Stunning Victory’ In Virginia Lieutenant Governor Race

Virginia lieutenant governor candidate Bishop E.W. Jackson (R), who will face off against Democrat state Sen. Ralph Northam at the polls tomorrow, predicted a “stunning victory” in an interview Monday.

In an interview with WMAL, Jackson said he thought “marginalized” voters would be the key to a big win.

“I think there’s a lot of people out there who feel disenfranchised, they feel that they’ve been marginalized, some of them are Christians, some of them frankly are libertarians, some of them are small business people, a lot of them are veterans, and they have really galvanized around my campaign because even though I have been slandered and my words often twisted and taken out of context, they’ve appreciated the fact that I’ve been willing to stand up for the things that I believe in,” Jackson said, according to Raw Story.

“I think we’re going to have a stunning victory tomorrow,” Jackson continued.

Jackson also insisted he would fight for all voters’ rights, “whether they’re Buddhist or Muslim or Hindu or Atheists,” if elected lieutenant governor.

“Becoming lieutenant governor is not about me imposing my beliefs on others,” Jackson said.

Jackson’s beliefs have caused a stir in the past. Jackson has said evolution is falsebecause chimps can’t talk; God cannot bless the military because of gay marriage; government programs have done more harm to the African-American community than slavery; and Obama would make schools start “teaching all children homosexuality.”

 

Jackson lost 55-45…

Black Republican Lt Governor Candidate Lies About Childhood

“Pulling oneself up by your bootstraps” is de rigeur for black conservatives. Apparently growing up in a normal black family just doesn’t impress the white conservative folks. It is part and parcel of the black conservative victim rap…

“Action Jackson”, the Republican Party’s newest back conservative “standard” didn’t feel his growing up was quite tragic enough…

So he invented privation.

EW “Action” Jackson buckdances for the white conservative folks…

Jackson’s stump stories of childhood deprivation challenged by acquaintances

E.W. Jackson, the Chesapeake preacher known for controversial rhetoric, is facing new challenges as his campaign for lieutenant governor of Virginia enters its final weeks.

According to interviews and campaign finance reports, Jackson’s campaign has struggled with basic management issues, including financial accounting. And more recently, vivid details of his escape from deprivation in a Chester, Pa., foster home — the emotional core of his stump speech — have been challenged by two women who were there.

A campaign spokesman said Thursday that everything Jackson says on the trail about his upbringing is true.

Jackson says life was so tough with his impoverished foster family that they sometimes had to eat mayonnaise sandwiches for dinner. Other nights, there was no supper at all.

There was also no indoor bathroom, Jackson said, and as the youngest of the foster children, “I brought the pot down.” He was last in line for the once-a-week bath in a galvanized tub.

“I’m like, ‘What house was he in?’ ” said Nadine Molet, the adopted daughter of foster parents Willie and Rebecca Molet.

Nadine Molet shared the same roof with Jackson and said the bathroom was on the first floor, beyond the well-stocked kitchen. “I never remember missing a meal. We always had fatback, cornbread, pancakes. We always took a lot of food to church.”

Leola Brown, who lived in the unit next door and would come over to babysit Molet and Jackson, said, “They didn’t want for anything.” She remembers the banana pudding and fruited Jell-O she’d find there, and the bathroom, just as in her unit, was past the kitchen and “off to the right.”

Jackson declined requests for interviews. His campaign spokesman, Brian Marriott, said: “Nothing he’s saying about his childhood is untrue. Those were the conditions he experienced.”

After leading a struggling gospel-radio venture and facing bankruptcy in Massachusetts, then moving to Virginia and pursuing his vision of building a worldwide church, Jackson has spent much of the past three years trying his hand at a new career as a political candidate.

Jackson has faced repeated eruptions over his past and present rhetoric, including comments on gays and non-Christians. Democratic opponent Ralph Northam, a child neurologist and state senator from Norfolk, assailed Jackson for those comments and others, including Jackson’s contention that gay people’s “minds are perverted.”

According to interviews and records, Jackson has blurred the lines between his political and religious lives. Starting with his long-shot bid for the GOP nomination for the U.S. Senate in 2011 and 2012, his political efforts have faced financial questions.

In his run for lieutenant governor and his Senate bid, members of his tiny Chesapeake church were hired for campaign work.

Chris D’Ambra, a former campaign aide, said fundraising and money problems were constant.

“The problem was, he just wasn’t 100 percent committed to all the intricate details to actually get to that next step — to actually being in public office,” D’Ambra said.

D’Ambra had been brought on as campaign manager just out of college, following his previous job as a Papa John’s pizza delivery driver. Jackson’s campaign still owes him back pay, but he’s now entering Navy officer school and said he harbors no ill will.

Jackson was a hardworking boss and compelling speaker. “He was pretty calculated in every word he spoke, and he wanted us to be the same,” D’Ambra said.

Delmon Quesinberry, the former chairman of the Chesapeake Republican Party Committee and the man who brought Jackson into the local GOP, served as Jackson’s campaign treasurer in that race. As the bills stacked up, Quesinberry’s decades of accounting experience kicked in. But Jackson had other ideas.

“I have a certain way of doing this. If you had four bills that need to be paid, I would pay the oldest one. . . . We had a difference of opinion in that area,” Quesinberry said. “He felt like it was his campaign, and he would have the right to say who would get paid.”

Quesinberry would not say whom Jackson insisted on compensating. But he resigned, leaving the job of treasurer to Jackson’s wife. A Jackson spokesman declined to comment.

The Federal Election Commission has queried Theodora Jackson about the decision on her watch to essentially erase $25,000 from the campaign books. The campaign said it had mistakenly provided too high a figure for earlier donations. But the FEC has asked for more information.

In the lieutenant governor campaign, Theodora Jackson signed off on $13,000 in American Express bills listed as expenditures without detailing the actual spending as required by law. The campaign blamed her inexperience and last month promised corrections. But state officials said they have not received them.

Some of Jackson’s supporters have bristled at the attention. On a recent Sunday, nearly two dozen parishioners joined Jackson in the Springhill Suites meeting room where his church, the Exodus Faith Ministries, holds services. Congregant and campaign consultant JoAnn Barnes would not let a reporter attend….

Uncle Ben Carson – “Obamacare Worse Than Slavery”

Emboldened by first Sen Paul Ryan, and then sen Ted Cruz committing political Hari Kari – Ben Carson is warming up that buckdance and Jockey Suit for a potential political run in 2016 a la Herman Cain.

Obamacare is “worse than slavery”?

An American black man really said that shit?

Was it worse than being a Jewish person in Auschwitz, Uncle Ben?

Methinks Uncle Ben has a “racial displacement” issue…

Now where did I put that damn “Lawn Jockey of the Year Award”?

Takes One to Know One… Faux’s Latest Racial Crisis

In Faux New’ neverending search for the white Trayvon – Drudge drudged up a moron who operates a homophobic and anti-white racist site.

The problem here is that the two Faux “reporters” are just as racist as the bozo they caught.

Of course the terrorizing white folks here is heightened by the “fact” that the black person in question “held a day job at the Department of Homeland Security”, as a contracts officer. Obviously he was in charge of buying thousands of guns! Oh My!

Unfortunately for Faux, they get that one wrong too. Kimathi works for ICE, and was a small business contracts manager.

Ayo Kimathi video -

Kimathi has a history of suffering from schizophrenia, and by some reports was abused by his Uncle while growing up in Alabama.

Of course on Faux News two “Black Panthers” at one polling place in Pennsylvania threw the entire Presidential election…

One black schizophrenic nutcase with a YouTube account ought to be good for a “race war”!

Of course, if he had just stuck to the homophobic baiting… He’s have had a job on Faux.

Ayo Kimathi: Government Employee Accused Of Running Racist Website 

Ayo Kimathi, a Homeland Security employee, is accused of running a racist website. A government official has confirmed that Kimathi is behind the War on the Horizon page. The website warns of a war between the races. Using a pseudonym, Kimathi preaches against whites, homosexuals, and blacks who integrate with other races. As reported by ABC News, Kimathi is employed with the Department of Homeland Security as an officer for Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The website is disturbingly racist. However, it is not run from a government facility. On the site, Kimathi calls himself the “Irritated Genie.” In his blog, Kimathi speaks out against numerous political figures and celebrities, who he calls traitors to the black race. Some of his rants are directed at Oprah Winfrey, Condoleezza Rice, Colin Powell, and Lil Wayne. He describes President Obama as “a treasonous mulatto scum dweller … who will fight against reparations for Black people in amerikkka, but in favor of fag rights for freaks in amerikkka and Afrika.” Ayo Kimathi’s former supervisor eventually discovered the site. She was surprised about the hateful content. However, she had her doubts about Kimathi in the past:

“This guy is filled with hate… People are afraid he will come in with a gun someday and go postal. I am astounded, he’s employed by the federal government, let alone Homeland Security.”

Employees with the DHS are required to report outside activities, including websites, that may be a conflict of interest. Kimathi’s former supervisor states that he did approach her about the website. However, he was untruthful about the content. Kimathi told his supervisor that he would use the website to display entertaining videos and sell concert tickets. Kimathi’s statements were never verified, and the site remained online. Despite his colleagues’ reservations, Kimathi is described as a hard worker. Part of his job includes advocating for small business owners, many of which are minorities. His former supervisor points out that Kimathi “fights for the little guy… and he’s very good at it.”

 

A “Liberal Edumencation”…Indeed

You know if I was George Zimmerman’s lawyers, I’d be looking for 12 of these EW Jackson freakshows!

“Innocent! That Kneegrow was armed and dangerous with that candy bar, suh!”

The question though becomes – in an American Constellation, containing the stars of accomplished black Republicans of greater and lesser lights and brilliant stars like Condoleeza Rice, and General Colin Powell, and to a somewhat lesser extent ex-Congressman J.C. Watts…

Which now includes the shiny-new minted Senator-ex Congressman from South Carolina Tim Scott (and no – I don’t agree with Mr Scott politically, but I respect the way the guys is actually trying to do his job representing the people of his state unlike former Congressman, former felon, Alan West’s constant posturing for the recruiting poster for Lawn Jockeys)…

WTF would anyone be running a Jockey Suited Buckdancer like mis-Action Jackson?

I mean – it sure as hell isn’t to attract Minority voters.

And,if this is for the benefit of “de Republican white folks in the Old Dominion” – isn’t there a whole generation of kids who paid for that little mistake in “Intelligent Design” when those same folks shut down all the schools in one of the counties for 5 years so they couldn’t integrate?

And besides the fact that the guy (supposedly a Harvard Law School Graduate) is too stupid to hire and editor (I’m a blogger – can’t afford no editor!) for his book to get rid of the misspellings…

There is this video with the Space Fairy…Miss Cleo where are you?

MHP one Ewwwwwwwe Jackson, Republican LT Governor Candidate in Va

Ouch!

Uncle Ben?

The newest conservative Great Black Dope isn’t quite turning out to be the perfect Uncle Tom figure of a Herman Cain or Allen West…

Of course, it’s been a tough year for black conservative lawn ornaments. Herman Cain imploding as a sexual predator, Allen West exposed as a serial abuser. And the black MILF candidate,Jennifer Carroll of Florida, didn’t quite follow in the footsteps of the Sno’ Ho’…first being accused of being a closet queen, and now under investigation for financial scamming resulting in her resigning her job at Lt. Governor.

And along comes Dr Ben Carlson… The latest in a long line of Toms… Or is he?

The Faux News commentator, Megan Kelly here tries her best to get Ben to buckdance. Carlson largely doesn’t rise to the bait. She looks at one point that if he will don the black conservative victim meme, she’d strip off her clothes, open her legs and have her way with him. About the best she gets out of him for hr breathless prodding is a single “plantation” meme, which completely discredits his argument about dropping name calling and sitting down to talk like adults. For anyone unfamiliar the “plantation” analogy is racist conservative speak for the N word.

Carlson at one point discusses poverty, at which point Megan near  orgasmically immediately zooms in to the inner city, black population, ignoring the fact or rural and suburban poverty which fits in every other social dysfunction … but isn’t primarily black. After all, Carlson is black – so he must be speaking about those dread Negroes in the ghetto!

That’s not what he said.

Let’s hope for Megan’s sake she got a chance to change clothes, and the set crew swapped in a dry chair before the next segment.

Why You Here if You Didn’t Come to Buckdance?

Conservatives, CPAC, and that racism thing again…

Interesting the mind convolutions where people will go to to deny the truth, and make the opposite fit their racist views. Frederick Douglass as a “conservative”?

These people are a joke. An evil joke – and typical of this segment of conservatism.

Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man’s sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.

Martin Luther King Jr.
US black civil rights leader & clergyman (1929 – 1968)

D’Souza Exposed By Christian Magazine

It would seem that it’s not only “evil” liberals seeing through conservative pundit and trash writer Dinesh D’Souza’s act. It appears Dinesh is dumping his wife of 20 years for a Trophy Girlfriend half her age…

Dinesh D’Souza Fiancée Scandal Rocks The King’s College

Dinesh D'SouzaConservative provocateur Dinesh D’Souza, riding a wave of attention for his successful anti-Obama documentary, 2016: Obama’s America, suddenly finds himself swamped by a different sort of attention, this time over his alleged relationship with a 29-year-old woman with whom he shared a hotel room and described as his “fiancée” despite still being married to his wife of 20 years.

The evangelical magazine World reported Tuesdaythat D’Souza, who is also the president of The King’s College in Manhattan, shared a hotel room with Denise Odie Joseph at a conference in South Carolina in September and introduced her to at least three people as his fiancée. A conference organizer confirmed to World that D’Souza and Joseph had both checked in to the hotel and left together, and D’Souza confirmed to the magazine that he and Joseph were engaged. But California court records show that he only filed for divorce from his wife on Oct. 4, which means he will be married for at least another six months. D’Souza later sent a text message to World’s reporter saying that he had decided to “suspend” the engagement.

Joseph graduated from high school in 2002, according to her Facebook page, and attended Georgetown University’s law school. Her website, I Denise Lust After, appeared to be taken offline, but a blog she authors on the site Smart Girl Politics remains active.

D’Souza moved from California to New York in 2010 to become the president of The King’s College, a small evangelical school with headquarters in Manhattan’s financial district, leaving his wife behind in California. According to former staffers who worked closely with D’Souza, his wife didn’t want to move, and the distance put a strain on their marriage. In early 2012, Joseph began showing up at the college, which was then headquartered in the Empire State Building, where students and staff eventually noticed her inexplicable presence. A former student said people would ask about Joseph, whom he described as “pushy,” but would be met with “weird smiles” and evasive answers. That student said one of his friends, a staffer who worked closely with D’Souza, was tasked with creating an official response to the speculation, which was that she was “a good friend of Dinesh.” The student said staffers he knew believed Joseph made her presence known at the college because she wanted to be more than D’Souza’s “road tail.” Continue reading

Melissa Harris-Perry Calls Out Clarence Thomas

This is a good one. One of the reasons it is critical that Obama win this next election is the opportunity to replace at least 2 justices on the Supreme Court and clean up the cesspool the Rethugs made of that institution.

 

Clarence Thomas Fesses Up on ole in Conservative View of Constitution

No Tommy… The founding fathers didn’t include your black ass in the Constitution…

Thomas concedes that ‘we the people’ didn’t include blacks

It is true, Justice Clarence Thomas acknowledged the other night, that the “we the people” extolled in the Constitution 225 years ago did not include people who looked like him.

But the Declaration of Independence did, he contended, and that was something that a black kid growing up in Savannah, Ga., was told early on.

“There was always this underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in ‘we the people,’ ” Thomas told a crowd at the National Archives last week.

“That’s the way we grew up. It was the way the nuns, who were all immigrants, would explain it to us — that we were entitled, as citizens of this country, to be full participants. There was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. It said so in the Declaration of Independence.”

Thomas submitted to about an hour of extremely gentle questioning from Yale Law School professor Akhil Reed Amar at an event called “The Constitution Turns 225,” co-sponsored by the liberal Constitutional Accountability Center and the conservative Federalist Society.

It was a packed house, drawn perhaps by the chance to see the “silent justice” speak. That’s far more myth than reality, of course.

It is true that Thomas hasn’t asked a question during the court’s oral arguments since 2006. But he speaks regularly to groups and law schools, and he put on a full publicity blitz when his memoir “My Grandfather’s Son” was published in 2007, including a sit-down with “60 Minutes” and a multi-part series on “Nightline.”

Thomas can on occasion be melancholy in his speeches, such as saying he sometimes envies the seemingly carefree lives he sees from his chamber windows. Several years ago, he told a group of high school students that he sometimes gets “morose,” and bucks himself up by reading inspirational speeches or retreating to the basement to watch the movie “Saving Private Ryan.”

He remains distrustful of Washington, although he mentioned during the discussion that he has lived here more than half of his 64 years. He often refers to it as “this city,” and says it is inhabited by ”cynical people who know it all.”

The “unlettered” people he grew up with, especially his grandparents, he said, withstood “the most difficult circumstances with a dignity that’s unmatched in this city.”

Amar repeatedly brought the conversation back to the point that under the original Constitution, people “like us” were not included. And Thomas spoke extensively about race — after noting with sarcasm that “people say horrible things about it — they say I’m not black, so I’m just a little doubtful I should say I’m black.”

“I always think it’s so fascinating to think of these black kids in the segregated school in Savannah reciting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States or standing out in the schoolyard saying the Pledge of Allegiance every day before school,” Thomas said.

“I mean, everything so obviously in front of you is wrong. You can’t go to the public library. You can’t live in certain neighborhoods. You can’t go to certain schools. But despite all of that, you lived in an environment of people who said it was still our birthright to be included, and continued to push, not only to change the laws, but to maintain that belief in our hearts.”

Thomas also noted a period in his college years in which the belief was not so strong.

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