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KKK Comes to the Defense of, and Makes Campaign Calls for Republicans

No surprise here, the party of racism is getting lots of support from white supremacists.

First up, for the Republican Governor of Maine –

Former KKK grand wizard praises Maine Gov. for exposing ‘defilement’ of white girls by black men

Former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke came to the defense of Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R) after he asserted that drug dealers with names like “D-Money, Smoothie, Shifty” would often come to his state to sell drugs and then “impregnate a young, white girl” before leaving.

LePage later insisted that he was “not going to deny or apologize” for his remarks, andlashed out at media and state lawmakers for criticizing him.

On his Friday radio program, Duke came to the governor’s defense, praising the remarks as part of what he said was the “Trump effect of people not talking in politically correct manner.”

“You are probably picking yourself off the floor to think that an elected governor in the United States of America would actually talk about this horrible destruction and defilement of young white women,” the former Klansman opined. “These are not Anglo-Saxon guys from rural Maine doing this. These are, again, like the Puff Diddys — or whatever they want to call themselves — from New York.”

Appearing as a guest on Duke’s show, Pastor Mark Dankof argued that LePage was “trying to horn in on the Trump vote” for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who he is supporting in the 2016 presidential race.

The pair also ripped Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, who they called “a truly evil woman,” for comparing LePage’s remarks to the “hateful and divisive rhetoric” being used by Republican candidates.

“Isn’t this the same Hillary Clinton who has constantly told us about black people being victimized by police?” Duke asked. “She says that this is a racist problem that police are shooting down blacks. When the fact is, they shoot down proportionally a far higher capita of a white person who acts criminally.”

“Hillary Clinton and Bill Clinton, from the beginning, have been financed and promoted politically by Jewish interests,” Pastor Dankof said.

Next – Making Campaign calls for Trump –

White Supremacists Robocalling for Trump

One of America’s most prominent white supremacists is making robocalls in Iowa imploring voters to support Donald Trump. Jared Taylor, the publisher of the white-nationalist American Renaissance website and the author of White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century, is making the calls on behalf of the American National Super PAC, which filed a statement of organization with the Federal Elections Commission late last week.

“I’m Jared Taylor with American Renaissance,” he says on the call, which was first flagged by Talking Points Memo. “I urge you to vote for Donald Trump because he is the one candidate who points out that we should support immigrants who are good for America.

“We don’t need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture. Vote Trump.”

Rev. Donald Tan, who TPM identifies as a Filipino-American pastor and talk-show host, also endorses Trump on the call. A press release announcing the robocall effort refers to Trump as the “Great White Hope” and says Tan decided to team up with white nationalists to support Trump because he had been “called of God to make America great again.”

At the end of the Iowa robocall, the group’s treasurer, William Johnson, who filed the statement with the FEC, identifies himself as a “farmer and white nationalist” and says the call has not been authorized by Trump.

Taylor has been a major player in white-nationalist circles since the 1990s and is a spokesman for the racist Council of Conservative Citizens, the ideological heir of the White Citizens Councils, which fought desegregation during the civil-rights era. The CCC was prominently cited in the manifesto of Dylann Roof, who massacred nine people at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina, last June. Speaking for the CCC, Taylor denounced the killings while insisting Roof had “legitimate grievances.”

Trump has become an extremely popular figure among white nationalists, who tend to believe that the United States should be dissolved in favor of “ethnostates” and the creation of a white homeland. At a white-nationalist conference held on Halloween in Washington, D.C., Richard Spencer, another leading figure on the far right, praised Trump as an ideological “icebreaker.”

“[W]hat I think he’s done is that he’s delegitimized—and I think he’s to a degree he’s humiliated—mainstream conservatives, the elite of the GOP, and certainly the kind of fuddy-duddy conservative movement types, the National Review,” Spencer told The Daily Beast at the time. “He’s delegitimized them, he’s humiliated them, and I think that opens a space for someone else… it’s not so much Trump per se. It’s not like we think he’s going to save the world. It’s like we finally felt like we’re breaking through, that something’s breaking out, and what comes after Trump is going to be interesting.”

So far, Trump has been reluctant to offer a full-throated condemnation of his white-supremacist fans such as Taylor and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. The robocall, however, may put the Republican frontrunner in a tough position, as it shows some white nationalists are now actively campaigning on his behalf. As Taylor himself told The New Yorker over the summer: “I’m sure he would repudiate any association with people like me, but his support comes from people who are more like me than he might like to admit.”

 

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Remembering Rosewood

In about 1820, due to the new “Black Codes” implemented in Virginia denying gun rights to free blacks, my g-g-g-Grandfather and Uncle petitioned the Court as free black men to have the ability to carry guns. They lived in a rural area of Virginia, not far from where Virginia Tech University is located in Blacksburg, Va. They owned fairly productive land on the banks of the New River which winds and wanders for 350 miles though North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, and is the only river I know of in America which travels north, it eventually joins the Ohio River.

The family had settled the area, then considered the “Frontier”, shortly after the Revolutionary War, along with other free black families – some of whom won their freedom by fighting on the side of the British, and less frequently the Colonial Armies. They had built a “Plantation” on a large tract of land, adjoining one of the most prosperous white settlers in the area of the time, with whom they regularly traded tools and equipment manufactured by them for other manufactured goods, and perhaps labor.

One of the biggest fears at that time by free blacks was “slave catchers” an unscrupulous and bankrupt group of individuals who would on opportunity kidnap and family member they could get their hands on to sell into slavery further South. Aside from dangers of the native wildlife (bears and Mountain Lion were common at that time), they had to keep an eye out for the slavers in the sparsely populated area. The answer quite simply was, the slavers went up the mountain…and never came down. I confirmed this family legend one year while hunting on the property and discovering the entrance to a limestone cavern, and upon going back to get a bright spotlight to look in, finding the skeletons of at least half a dozen bodies at the bottom of the shaft, one of which appears to have had the remnants of a confederate uniform. Of course, nobody knew when the slavers would sneak into the area, as their business was illegal even by the laws of the time, and they didn’t exactly report their presence to. the local sheriff.

The bothers petitioned the court for the right to (continue to) carry guns as local landowners and citizens and won. Somewhere in the family there is an old octagon barrel Kentucky style rifle which belonged to them. In my inherited collection is one 44-40 Winchester rifle going back to the 1870’s that belonged to one of their sons or grandsons. At nearly 150 years old it certainly isn’t fire-able, even if you could find black powder cartridges for it. The fact that they continued to defend the home place from nefarious scumbags is evidenced by the dead confederate, placing their activity as late as the 1860’s during or after the Civil War.

With the emergence of the Second KKK in 1900, attacks on black communities, often for flimsily manufactured reasons and lynching s accelerated until “Red Summer” in 1919. What radically changed was that the black soldiers who had fought in WWI came home, not only with military training but sometimes with their rifles. Resulting in blacks fighting back against the wholesale community attacks similar to those in Rosewood and Tulsa,  in the “race riots” in Washington, DC, Chicago, IL, and Knoxville, TN – where things were substantially less one sided. Faced with folks who would shoot back, and not easy victims… The KKK and other racist organizations…blinked. It didn’t stop the lynchings – but it was no longer safe to attack a large black community. One of the things forgotten by history is that the folks in Tulsa did set up a defense, and the center of the town was designed to be defense-able. They just didn’t have enough guns. Rosewood was a small community of only about 16 houses.

With the rise of the Fourth KKK, or the Fourth Reich under Trump, and his like minded cohort of fools in the Reich Wing Clown Bus, at least to my belief, it is time for the black communities, and individuals to arm up again. We need to take the attitude of the Jews, “Never Forget”. Now this doesn’t mean going to to the store and buying a little Glock popgun pistol. The only reason any US Army soldiers carry a pistol, is to have a little something when their rifle runs out of ammo. They know full well that a guy and his “9” will last about a NY millisecond against someone armed with an AK, or AR-15 variant rifle… Or even a modern shotgun.

Sometimes the only way to get peace is out of the barrel of a gun. White people are not your enemy, but those deluded racist fools following the neo-fascist right, who happen to be white, are. We seem to be barreling down the road to a parallel with Nazi Germany, where a virulent minority can grab control of an entire nation. I don’t know about you – but I ain’t going in that cattle car peacefully in this here New American Reich.

Rosewood…After the Massacre

Remembering Rosewood: The racist lie that set off the destruction of a black Florida community

Four black schoolchildren raced home along a dirt road in Archer, Florida, in 1944, kicking up a dust cloud wake as they ran. They were under strict orders from their mother to run – not lollygag or walk or jog, but run – directly home after hitting the road’s curve.

The littlest, six-year-old Lizzie Robinson (now Jenkins), led the pack with a brother on each side and her sister behind carrying her books.

“And I would be [running], my feet barely touching the ground,” Jenkins, now 77, said at her home in Archer.

Despite strict adherence to their mother’s orders, the siblings weren’t told why they should race home. To the children, it was one of several mysterious dictates issued during childhood in the Jim Crow south.

As Jenkins tells it, the children didn’t know why Amos ’n’ Andy was often interrupted by revving engines and calls from her father to “Go upstairs now!”, or why aunt Mahulda Carrier, a schoolteacher, fled to the bedroom each time a car drove down their rural road.

Explanations for demands to hide came later, when Jenkins’s mother, Theresa Brown Robinson, whispered to her daughter the story of violence that befell the settlement of Rosewood in 1923.

The town was 37 miles south-east of Archer on the main road to the Gulf. Carrier worked there as the schoolteacher, while living with her husband Aaron Carrier. On New Year’s Day 1923, a white woman told her husband “a nigger” assaulted her, a false claim that precipitated a week of mob violence that wiped the prosperous black hamlet off the map, and led to the near lynching of Aaron Carrier.

Jenkins now believes that all of it – the running, calls to go upstairs, her aunt fleeing to the bedroom – was a reaction to a message her parents received loud and clear: don’t talk about Rosewood, ever, to anyone.

But after Jim Crow laws lifted, and lynch mob justice was no longer a mortal threat, survivors did begin to talk. So egregious were the stories of rape, murder, looting, arson and neglect by elected officials, that Florida investigated the claims in a 1993 report.

That led to a law that eventually compensated then elderly victims $150,000 each, and created a scholarship fund. The law, which provided $2.1m total for the survivors, improbably made Florida one of the only states to create a reparations program for the survivors of racialized violence, placing it among federal programs that provided payments to Holocaust survivors and interned Japanese Americans.

News of Florida’s reparations program ran nationwide when it was passed in 1994, on the front page of the Wall Street Journal among others. Hollywood picked up the tale. Don Cheadle starred in a 1997 film about the pogrom. Several books were written about Rosewood.

Though the legislation was never called such, the program now represents one of just a handful of reparations cases in the United States, as calls to compensate victims of racialized violence have grown louder in the last two years.

2015 brought renewed calls to compensate victims of race-related violence from college students, theologians and criminal justice advocates. The city of Chicago started a $5.5m reparations fund for the more than 100 victims tortured at the hands of police commander Jon Burge.

Last month, students at Georgetown University demanded that the administration set aside an endowment to recruit black professors equal to the profit from an 1838 slave sale that paid off university debt. The 272 slaves were sold for $400 each, the equivalent of about $2.7m today. One day after protests began, students successfully renamed a residence hall named after Thomas Mulledy, the university president who oversaw the sale (it was renamed Freedom Hall).

At least one progressive Christian theologian is pushing Protestants to reckon their own history with slavery with reparations. In 2014, Atlantic writer Ta-Nehisi Coates breathed fresh life into the debate in his widely lauded article The Case for Reparations .

Rosewood burning

Where Rosewood once stood is now little more than a rural scrubland along state road 24, a lonely highway in central Florida bordered by swamp, slash pine and palmetto. A placard on the side of the road describes the horror visited upon the hamlet.

But in 1923, the settlement was a small and prosperous predominantly black town, with its own baseball team, a masonic temple and a few hundred residents. It was just three miles from the predominantly white town of Sumner, and 48 miles from Gainesville.

On New Year’s Day 1923, white Sumner resident Fannie Taylor was bruised and beaten when her husband returned home. The Taylors were white, and the residents of Sumner were in near universal agreement that Fannie’s assailant was black.

A crowd swelled in Sumner to find the “fugitive”, some from as far away as Gainesville, where the same day the Klu Klux Klan held a high-profile parade. Over the next seven days gangs of hundreds delivered lynch mob justice to the once-affluent town of Rosewood.

“I blame the deputy sheriff,” Robie Mortin, a Rosewood survivor, told the Seminole Tribune in 1999. “Because that lady never dropped a name as to who did what to her. Just said a negro, black man. But when the sheriff came along with his posse and everything, he put a name to the person: Jesse Hunter.”

Mortin died in 2010 at age 94 in Riviera Beach, Florida. She was believed to be one of the last survivors of the New Year’s riots in 1923. After years of silence she became one of the most vocal. Though Florida completed an investigation into the events that took place in Rosewood, some narratives remain disputed.

“They didn’t find Jesse Hunter, but noticed that here’s a bunch of niggers living better than us white folks. That disturbed these people,” Mortin said. Her uncle, Sam Carter, is believed to have taken the man who beat Taylor, a fellow Mason, to safety in Gulf Hammock, a few miles away. When Carter returned he was tortured, shot and lynched by the mob looking for Taylor’s assailant.

“My grandma didn’t know what my uncle Sammy had done to anybody to cause him to be lynched like that,” Mortin told the Tribune. “They took his fingers and his ears, and they just cut souvenirs away from him. That was the type of people they were.”

Carter is believed to be the first of eight documented deaths associated with the riots that would worsen over the next three days.

The settlement itself was wiped off the map. Several buildings were set on fire just a few days after New Year’s, and the mob wiped out the remainder of the town a few days later, torching 12 houses one by one. At the time, the Gainesvile Sun reported a crowd of up to 150 people watched the dozen homes and a church set ablaze. Even the dogs were burned.

“The burning of the houses was carried out deliberately and although the crowd was present all the time, no one could be found who would say he saw the houses fired,” a Sun report said, describing the scene.

At least two white men died, including CP “Poly” Wilkerson of Sumner and Henry Andrews of Otter Creek, when they attempted to storm a house Rosewood residents had barricaded themselves in.

A state report on the violence identifies murdered black Rosewood residents as Sam Carter, matriarch Sarah Carrier, James Carrier, Sylvester Carrier and Lexie Gordon. Mingo Williams, a black man who lived nearby, was also killed by the mob.

Aaron Carrier, Mahulda’s husband and Jenkins’s uncle, was nearly killed when he was dragged behind a truck and tortured on the first night of the riots. At death’s door, Carrier was spirited away by the Levy county sheriff, Bob Walker, she said, and placed in jail in Bronson as a favor to the lawman.

Mahulda was captured later the same night by the mob, Jenkins said, and tortured before Walker eventually found her.

“They got Gussie, that was my aunt’s name, they tied a rope around her neck, however they didn’t drag her, they put her in the car and took her to Sumner. Don’t know if you know – a southern tradition is to build a fire … and to stand around the fire and drink liquor and talk trash,” Jenkins said.

“So they had her there, like she was the [accused], and they were the jury, and they were trying to force her into admitting a lie. ‘Where was your husband last night?’ ‘He was at home in bed with me.’ They asked her that so many times so she got indignant with them … And they said, ‘She’s a bold bitch – let’s rape the bitch.’ And they did. Gang style.”

Another Rosewood resident, James Carrier, was shot over the fresh graves of his brother and mother after several men captured and interrogated him. He was first told to dig his own grave, but couldn’t because two strokes had paralyzed one arm. The men left his body splayed over the graves of his family members.

But despite widespread coverage of the incident – the governor was even notified via telegram – the state did nothing.

Not for one month, when it appears a feeble attempt to indict locals was made by a grand jury, after all the residents of Rosewood had long fled into the nearby swamps and settlements of central Florida.

The oral history of Rosewood was a secret, passed through several families with each recipient sworn to silence, as black Americans endured decades of terror in Florida. When Jenkins was six her parents would have had fresh memories of lynchings.

From 1877 to 1950, the county where the Robinsons lived, Alachua, had among the largest sheer volume of lynchings of any community in the nation, according to the Equal Justice Initiative. Per capita, Florida lynched more people than any other state. And counties surrounding Alachua were not friendlier.

Hernando, Citrus, Lafayette and Taylor counties had some of the highest per capita rates of lynchings in the country. By volume, nearby Marion and Polk counties had among the most in the US.

Legislation, reparations and state reckons with ugly past

The story only came to light in 1982, after a reporter at the then St Petersburg Times exposed the forgotten riot. The reporter, Gary Moore, had traveled to Cedar Key, 10 miles south-west of Rosewood on the coast, to explore a Sunday feature on the rural Gulf town.

“Like the public at large, I personally had never heard of Rosewood,” Moore wrote in a synopsis of research published in the 1993 report that was submitted to the Florida Board of Regents. “I held dim assumptions that any such incident would long ago have been thoroughly researched and publicized by historians, sociologists, anthropologists, advocacy organizations, or others.”

That it wasn’t, Moore blamed on “psychological denial” and “blindness”.

“There were many things thought better left unquestioned,” Moore reasoned.

By 1993, before the report was issued, Moore’s story had made a wide impact, becoming a 60 Minutes documentary and earning follow-ups by other news outlets. Moore, however, recounted in detail his struggle for academic and political acceptance of the narrative, and said even 11 years after his story appeared many attempted to deny the massacre occurred.

One of Moore’s sources, Arnett Doctor, would later devote much of his life to lobbying for Rosewood reparations. Doctor, a descendant of survivors, spent untold hours eliciting detailed narratives of the event from survivors. He is often cited as the“driving force” behind the reparations bill, as the man who brought his findings to high-powered attorneys at Holland & Knight, who helped lobby the legislature for reparations.

Doctor died at the age of 72 in March 2015, in Spring Hill, Florida, a few hours south of Rosewood.

“We deliberately avoided anything but compensation for the losses they incurred,” said Martha Barnett, an attorney at Holland & Knight who helped lobby the Florida legislature on behalf of the survivors of Rosewood. Barnett said the term “reparations” can’t be found in the law passed in Florida.

Instead, attorneys focused on private property rights. She said she and other attorneys needed “to make it something legislators could find palatable in the deep south some 20-some years ago”.

Barnett said the then Democratic governor, Lawton Chiles, promised his support from the beginning. By April 1994, the House passed a bill to compensate victims of the attack with a 71-40 vote. Four days later, on 9 April 1994, the Senate passed a matching bill with a vote of 26-14, to cries of “Praise the lord!” from those Rosewood descendants present.

“It’s time for us to send an example, a shining example, that we’re going to do what’s right – for once,” Democratic senator Matthew Meadows said at the time. Chiles diedless than four years after signing the bill.

Now, near Rosewood, Rebel flags are common. Businesses bear the name, and some locals would be as happy to again forget the incident.

Information on the pogrom is notably muted in some local historical societies.

“What it takes to make someone whole, what it takes to repair the past, is probably different for every person, and some things are more effective than others,” said Barnett.

Many of the survivors invested the money they received into their homes. Willie Evans, 87 when he received the $150,000 payment in 1995, put a new roof , windows and doors on his home. Mortin considered traveling to Greece. Jenkins’s mother, who received $3,333.33 from the fund, placed ledgers on the graves of her sister, three brothers and parents.

“The thing that mattered most to [survivors] was that the state of Florida said, ‘We had an obligation to you as our citizens, we failed to live up to it then, we are going to live up to it today, and we are sorry,’” Barnett said.

For Doctor, whose own identity seemed wrapped up in the Rosewood story (the license plate on his truck read “ROSEWOOD” ), even the unique success of the legislation was not enough. He dreamed of rebuilding the town.

“The last leg of the [healing process] is the redevelopment and revitalization of a township called Rosewood,” Doctor told the Tampa Bay Times in 2004 , as the plaque along State Road 24 was dedicated by then governor Jeb Bush. “If we could get $2bn, $3bn of that we could effect some major changes in Levy County.”

 

 

 

 
 

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Donald Trump a Gift to ISIS…And the White Supremacist Internet

The Donald is firing up the haters…Once moribund, and basically restricted to the hard core troglodytes, sites like the White Supremacist Stormfront now see 1 million hits a month, an a 40% rise in traffic each time the Trumpazoid disparages minorities…

Donald Trump’s Campaign Has ‘Reenergized’ the White-Supremacist Internet

Donald Trump’s anti-Muslim rhetoricis so popular that the best-known white-supremacist site on the web, Stormfront, says it’s installing new servers to handle all the traffic the Republican presidential front-runner has generated.

Talking to Politico, Stormfront founder Don Black said Trump’s campaign had reenergized the white-nationalist movement, and Stormfront has the traffic to prove it. He said Stormfront now sees a million unique visitors a month, and traffic spikes 30 to 40 percent whenever Trump makes a controversial statement about minorities.

“Demoralization has been the biggest enemy and Trump is changing all that,” Black said.

Even David Duke, infamous racist politician and former Ku Klux Klan figurehead, agrees Trump has been great for racist movements.

“He’s made it ok to talk about these incredible concerns of European Americans today,” Duke told Politico.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, finding a rare point of agreement with Stormfront, also told Politico that Trump has reenergized hate groups. The civil-rights organization told Politico the bloviating billionaire has been “driving online chatter” among white-power groups.

Perhaps more disturbing are the white supremacists who like Trump’s anti-Mexican, anti-Muslim pronouncements, but feel he hasn’t gone far enough. Banning all Muslim immigration to the U.S. sounds great to them, but they worry Trump doesn’t have the dedication to activate the military and follow through with his plan.

 

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White Supremacist Foiled In Ray Gun Mass Murder Attempt

An industrial X-Ray machine certainly has the power to kill through irradiating victims. This white supremacist decided to try loading one in a truck and use it to drive by victims. This, like most whit supremacist and right wing plots almost never hits the news – and is never covered in the right wing press.

 

This White Terrorist Plotted To Kill Innocent Americans, But You Probably Haven’t Heard Of Him

A 55-year-old man thought he had procured a working X-ray device that could focus lethal levels of radiation on residents of an upstate New York community.

It’s exactly the kind of horrific plot that might raise the alarm amid the heightened concern over terrorist attacks on the United States. But there’s something notably different about this case — Eric Feight is white, and his intended victims were Muslim-Americans.

Feight on Wednesday was sentenced to prison for 97 months — more than eight years — for providing material support to terrorists, according to the FBI. He would have gone through with the plot, but federal agents fooled him by posing as Ku Klux Klan members who promised to finance and obtain a “radiation device” that didn’t actually work, the FBI said.

In a world where the mere mention of a plot by a jihadist gets wall-to-wall news coverage, and where fear of terrorism leads presidential candidates to call for a full ban on Muslim immigration, the New York state death ray plot received relatively little notice.

In January 2014, Feight pleaded guilty to helping klansman Glendon Crawford modify the X-ray machine, as well as another device which — if it worked — would remotely activate the X-ray machine on a truck. That rig was supposed to irradiate their victims, killing them days later. The device was never actually operable, the FBI said.

“Eric Feight aided Glendon Scott Crawford in altering a dispersal device to target unsuspecting Muslim Americans with lethal doses of radiation,” Assistant Attorney General John P. Carlin said on Wednesday. “Feight and Crawford’s abominable plot to harm innocent Americans was thwarted thanks to the tireless efforts of law enforcement.”

The FBI called the device a “weapon of mass destruction” in August, though it appears to have softened its language since.

In June 2012, an undercover investigator brought Crawford X-ray tubes to examine for possible use in the weapon, and provided technical specifications a month later. At a meeting that November in an Albany coffee shop with undercover investigators, Crawford brought Feight. Both men committed to building the device and named the group “the guild,” according to the indictment against them.

Investigators gave Feight $1,000 to build the remote control device and showed the men pictures of industrial X-ray machines they said they could obtain. They planned to provide him access to an actual X-ray system to assemble with the remote control in June 2013. According to court documents, the sealed indictment was filed the same day and both men were arrested.

Crawford was convicted in August and awaits sentencing.

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Over the Top at Citadel

This one seems to be a bit overheated. Unless there is more evidence than just a bunch of cadets dressing up in silly costumes, open to mis-interpretation  that offended someone were trying to “deliver a racial message”  – I don’t see any fire here. Silly, perhaps stupid – but where is the tie in that this group of cadets were trying to deliver anything but some cheer? I mean these are college kids, who consistently do stupid things without thought of consequence, or how someone may misinterpret their actions.

Citadel suspends eight cadets for wearing KKK-like white hoods to sing Christmas carols

The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, was forced to suspend eight cadets on Thursday after photos of an apparent hazing ritual surfaced online showing the cadets donning all-white, with white pillowcases over their heads.

“A social media posting, which I find offensive and disturbing, was brought to my attention this morning,” retired Air Force Lt. Gen. John Rosa, the president of the college, said in a statement on Thursday announcing the immediate activation of suspension proceedings for at least eight cadets and investigation into the images.

“Preliminary reports are cadets were singing Christmas carols as part of a ‘Ghosts of Christmas Past’ skit,” he wrote in a Facebook post, adding that the costumes were pillowcases. “These images are not consistent with our core values of honor, duty and respect.”

According to Charleston station WCIV, the images were discovered by an African-American woman on the social media site Snapchat.

“I screenshotted and decided to share because I was so offended,” she wrote, posting the images to Facebook this week. “Was this their idea of some kind of joke?”  WCIV reports the woman was later “threatened, harassed and offered money from numerous Citadel Cadets to take it offline in order to not ‘ruin their lives.’”

I think this woman, if she is a Cadet – is in for a hard time in the military. Without some sort of supporting information of nefarious intent, she has done more harm than good. It seems that we are drifting here from “I know racism when I see it”…to seeing racism everywhere.

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2015 in The Definition of Racism

 

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KKK Leader Holds Up Vote for Trump Sign During His Trial For Raping Children

Not the type of association the Trump campaign managers want…But the type Trump has courted.

A photoshopped image…But not far from the truth. Apparently former Aryan Nation Leader Kreis displayed a “Vote for Trump” sign throughout his trial.

KKK leader found guilty of molesting girls: ‘I will always hate the Jew — and please vote for Trump!’

A South Carolina jury was apparently unswayed a neo-Nazi’s “vote for Trump” sign and convicted the former Ku Klux Klan leader of sexually abusing two girls.

August Kreis III was found guilty Thursday of one count of criminal sexual conduct involving a minor child and two counts of committing lewd acts on a child, reportedThe State.

Three young women testified during a three-day trial that Kreis repeatedly molested two girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 years old.

The 61-year-old Kreis, a onetime Aryan Nation leader and Christian Identity pastor, held up a sign throughout the trial expressing his support for Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump.

Circuit Court Judge Douet “Jack” Earley instructed jurors to ignore the sign and focus instead on the evidence.

Trump, the real estate tycoon and reality TV star, holds a four-point lead in South Carolina — which will be the first southern state to hold a presidential primary next year.

The GOP candidate has drawn support from many of the most influential white supremacists in the U.S., including Kreis — whose activity and influence has waned with his arrest and diabetes-related health problems.

One of the sex abuse victims read a poem during the sentencing hearing that described Kreis, who lived for a time in the same town as the Charleston church gunman, as a “monster.”

“My soul cries at the mention of your name,” the woman read. “Your disgusting little secret is out. I hope you are haunted till the day you die for the things you’ve done.”

The white supremacist, who is perhaps best known for an explosive appearance two decades ago on “The Jerry Springer Show,” spouted off hateful remarks and expressed support for his preferred candidate just before sentencing.

“I will always hate the Jew,” Kreis said. “This government is run by an evil group of people, and please — vote for Trump!”

Kreis was sentenced to 50 years in prison, and he told the judge he wanted to remain in jail for the rest of his life — which he almost certainly will.

A little background on Kreis, who appears in this video about halfway through…

As a kid, I remember these guys goose stepping around in Arlington, Va. Rockwell’s house was across a side street from the parking lot of the local Sears and Roebucks in North Arlington. They would parade around in their uniforms with their Nazi Flags trying very hard to look military. They generally had sense enough to leave the paying customers alone, but would sometimes put flyers on the windshield of cars in the lot.

This is another example of why Anonymous just going after the KKK isn’t enough. The guys often belong to multiple hate groups and drift from one to another. In Kreis’ case he started as an American Nazi,  moved to Aryan Nations where he was their leader, dabbled in the racist Skinheads, created the Christian Identity racist “religion”, and finally wound up back “home” in the KKK. No telling how many little girls this scumbag raped along the way.

 

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Anonymous Releases KKK List

The real Anonymous has released their Official KKK List.

The C of CC, one of the groups that should be targeted

Anonymous Reveals Full List Of Alleged KKK Members

“The reality is that racism usually does NOT wear a hood but it does permeate our culture on every level.”

The hackivist collective Anonymous released a much-anticipated list of people it claims are members or supporters of the Ku Klux Klan on Thursday night.

The group targeted the KKK in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri. They disclosed some contact information earlier this week, and promised to unveil the full trove onNovember 5th, Guy Fawkes Day.

The data dump, posted on Pastebin, began with an impassioned essay detailing Anonymous’ motives for the release.

“We hope Operation KKK will, in part, spark a bit of constructive dialogue about race, racism, racial terror and freedom of expression, across group lines,” the group said. “The reality is that racism usually does NOT wear a hood but it does permeate our culture on every level. Part of the reason we have taken the hoods off of these individuals is not because of their identities, but because of what their hoods symbolize to us in our broader society.”

Hackers spent 11 months gathering information on the alleged members, the group said, going to great lengths to confirm the identities as best as possible. They used public data and academic records as well as interviews with both experts and some of the KKK members themselves.

“We consider this data dump as a form of resistance against the violence and intimidation tactics leveraged against the public by various members of Ku Klux Klan groups throughout history,” Anonymous said.

Looks like they have about a fourth of the morons walking around in sheets type of racists – which isn’t going to include either the KKK in Suits groups (Council of Conservative Citizens), or the sympathizers and financiers of organized racism in the US. The last spending about $300 million a year to keep the racial pot stirred.Think they could round up some far more interesting fodder, as well as the names of some of the politicians released by the fake Anonymous group earlier this week if the dug that very deep and rich vein.

 

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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