Tag Archives: hate

Does The Internet Enable Hate Crimes and Mass Murder?

 Trolls and hate. The Internet was conceptualized as an open system across which to share ideas and scientific concepts. Unfortunately none of the founders, having grown up largely in the shielded world of academia had any concept of the nefarious uses to which the tool could be put by hate groups, criminals, and the mentally and socially imbalanced.

The Internet, besides enabling new types of crime, international crime, and deviant pornography such as kiddie porn has also enabled hate mongers through the anonymous nature of the system to spew their vile hatred and to recruit weak minded children like Dylaan Root, who got much of his racial animosity for the Council of Conservative Citizens Web site(s).

The killer in the recent Oregon Colleges mass shooting has been tied to antisocial hubs (4Chan), as well as white supremacist and chrisitian Identity hate groups on the conservative Web.

So it isn’t just the “white Sale” on guns driving the carnage – it is the commercial sale of, and manufacture of hate and disenfranchisement for political and power purposes.

We can stop this, but to do so requires a large group of people to first take down the entry point to the Hate Groups. That typically is the fact free and often racist world of conservative white identity politics. It includes going at sites like The National Review which publishes articles of racial hate mongering by such folks as Heather McDonald, and Michelle Malkin. Both of whom frequently are published or have contracts with VDare, a white supremacist site which uses conservative racist authors as a entre’ into the harcore racism of their staff. The American Spectator, the International Business Daily, the NRO, the Federalist, Townhall, and the Wall Street Journal all serve as entries into the world of hardore racism through the introduction to racist “theology”. Many of the sites actively ban liberal, or non-racist posters through cutting them off from posting to assure no level of sanity, or truth interferes with their incited hate fests. Indeed, many conservative sites run like rats when someone shines the light.

Got to hit them in their rat holes. If we can force the entry points to see the light – then it takes away the respectability of the supremacist sites and their ability to recruit little tow headed trolls and murders like Root.

De-legitimize hate.

Lone Wolves in the Age of the Internet: Do Hate Crimes Happen More Because of Broadband Internet Access?

In an ideal world, the Internet would be a place of inclusivity and democracy. Instead, it’s just the opposite.

A new research study led by Jason Chan, Ph.D., shows a positive relationship between broadband Internet access and incidence of hate crimes. Specifically,race-driven hate crimes committed by individuals, rather than those committed in groups, increased.

Chan, an Assistant Professor of Information and Decision Science for the Carson School of Management at the University of Minnesota, discovered the correlation using official FBI data on hate crime incidents, compared to that of broadband provider access taken from FCC documents. Between 2001 and 2008, access to just one broadband ISP showed a 20 percent rise in hate crimes, particularly in areas of high racial tension.

“We see this from two different perspectives,” Chan tells The Daily Beast, “the consumers of hate content, and the producers of it. Hate content refers to internet posts that bring about skewed ideologies and advocating for a supremacy of one race over other races.”

The first perspective has to do with selective exposure, wherein readers intentionally seek out information that galvanizes their fringe beliefs.

“When readers go online,” Chan says, “there is a specialization of interest. This magnifies or amplifies the messages posted on it. This is contrary to what we believe. We believe, instead of making things more narrow, the Internet should make things more inclusive and democratic. However, people tend to search out things relevant to existing interests, which amplifies such narrow thoughts.”

Chan says developing online recruitment techniques for hate peddlers contributes to this rise as well.

“Content providers,” Chan says, “have changed the way in which they have to execute their propaganda. They use a strategy known as leaderless resistance. Whenever they put up propaganda to have content to provide the motivation, encouragement, and justification to people on the edge. It gives them reason why they should be outside normal thought.”

After yet another mass shooting, this one leaving 10 people dead at Umpqua Community College last Thursday, digital traces of the lone gunman in the attack are again left to the examination of law enforcement officials and reporters. Just hours after the shooter, Chris Harper Mercer, was killed in a standoff with police, several online accounts tracing back to Mercer expressed hate for organized religion. What’s worse, one witness said Mercer forced his victims to state their beliefs before heartlessly killing them, specifically targeting Christians.

It’s a pattern becoming tragically more common: a mass shooting takes place, and we later discover how blatantly the perpetrators expressed hate for their victims online. In this case, clear connections emerge between recent shootings: Mercer referred, in one post, to Vester Flanagan, the man who killed two people on live television in Virginia in August. Flanagan himself made specific reference to Dylann Roof, the white supremacist who gunned down nine inside a Charleston, North Carolina church in June.

“In Dylann’s case,” Chan says, “he happened to chance upon one of these hate sites. And slowly but surely he was convinced. Through half truths and misrepresented facts, he believed individuals of his race should be doing something to serve justice back to the people. In some cases this hate content provides instructions. This type of grooming process takes time. But people see more, there are more opticals, one event tips them over and they commit the crime.”

The paper, titled “The Internet and Racial Hate Crime: Offline Spillovers from Online Access,” published in the forthcoming issue of MIS Quarterly, also offers solutions to combat this online surge. The paper suggests that, instead of engaging in a technological race with producers of hate content, policy should be implemented to educate youth on digital media, racial and social justice, stereotypical messages, and how to interpret multiple meanings.

Another plan of attack would increase the amount of anti- hate content on the net. But even an attempt to right the skewed beliefs presented across the web would be somewhat futile.

Between 2001 and 2008, access to just one broadband ISP showed a 20 percent rise in hate crimes, particularly in areas of high racial tension.

“The chance of such content being seen by the one who needs to see it are small,” says Chan. “And technological advances are moving so quickly we believe there could be newer assets in searching for digital traces of those who are likely, or at risk, of committing crimes. Such lone wolfs, before they do something, we can see some patterns.”

Unfortunately, Chan says, problems of free speech get wrapped up in who posts what online.

“This can reach a certain threshold. We’d need to tell apart those who intend to commit hate crimes and those who have those ideologies but stay within the law.”


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Bernie Gets It Right on Obama

Been saying this since the day Obama took office the first time. His biggest mistake was not understanding that the Republicans in Congress were every bit as much an enemy as Putin or the Ayatollah – and more damaging to America.

Bernie Sanders on Obama’s Biggest Mistake: Thinking GOP Leadership Was Reasonable

Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont whose policies are left of mainstream liberals, told David Axelrod that Obama made a “mistake” by expecting he could easily charm the other party into negotiating with him. “He thought he could walk into Capitol Hill and the Oval Office and sit down with John Boehner and Mitch McConnell and the Republicans and say, ‘I can’t get it all. You can’t get it all. Let’s work out something that’s reasonable,’ because he’s a reasonable guy. He’s a pretty rational guy,” Sanders said on the debut episode of “The Axe Files with David Axelrod” podcast.

“These guys never had any intention of doing [serious] negotiating and compromising,” Sanders added, according to a Politico report. “I think it took the president too long to fully appreciate that.”

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Posted by on October 5, 2015 in Domestic terrorism


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Rev Mack Daddy is Back!

Rev James Manning, AKA Rev Mack Daddy is back at it again. This time due to demonstrations at his family “Church”, ATLAH. He calls himself a “Dr.” The Revered Doctor’s Phd was awarded to himself by himself, though his own “church” – not any accredited College or University, or even a Seminary. He is a former favorite of Sean Hannity’s Lawn Ornament Show…

Pastor Has Epic Freakout When He’s Protested For His Hate

Harlem hate pastor James Manning is back again — this time throwing an epic tantrum on the steps of his religious institution.

On Tuesday, the leader of ATLAH World Missionary Church reportedly interrupted a candlelight vigil put together by Harlem Against Violence, Homophobia, And Transphobia to spew some pretty horrific anti-queer sentiment. According to the Facebook event page, the group organized the vigil after deciding they “can’t sit back and let incitements to violence go unanswered.”

Manning’s speech escalates as the video goes on, spewing anti-LGBT rhetoric and hate in the face of peaceful protestors

“You’re Jesus haters. You are racist as well,” Manning says in the above video. “C’mon you faggots! All you lesbos! All you perverted people! All you dung eaters! Come over here? Do you think your chants are going to stop me? You can no more stop me than you can stop the power of the blood of Jesus. I declare the blood of Jesus against you faggots, you lesbos, you perverts, you sick-minded people. You are sick! You are demon possessed! Stop the demons now! Stop the demons now!”

Manning’s church, which is located in New York’s Harlem neighborhood, first made headlines in February 2014 when he posted a sign in front of his church reading, “Obama has released the homo demons on the black man. Look out black woman. A white homo may take your man.”

The sign has changed a number of times since to display equally offensive statements, including “Jesus would stone homos” and “Harlem is a sodomite free zone. Stop sodomizing our children in schools across America.”

Manning has also made some pretty bizarrely offensive public statements, including that Starbucks uses “sodomites’ semen” in their lattes. 

Our favorite line from this most recent outburst? Apparently not only are we “homos” or something “wretched, unbelievable, despicable, disgrace to humanity,” but also our “breath stinks of another man’s butthole!”

We’re sure Jesus would’ve loved that one.

Not sure what the Rev is all worked up over. After all the Rev spent 3 years in prison, by his own admission. According to Ben Carson – that would make Rev Mack Daddy as “sodomite” and “homo” hisself!

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Posted by on September 27, 2015 in Black Conservatives


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Republican Proposes “Bringing Back Slavery”!

If you haven’t figured out that the right has far surpassed “the epitome of stupidity” , we have this case…And it isn’t Dingbat Trump…Although it is one of his followers.

Conservative racism at it’s…Typical

Jan Mickelson…Proving you can be 7 cans short of a full six pack


Conservative radio host’s comically horrific immigration plan: Let’s reinstitute slavery to build Donald Trump’s wall

As if the GOP’s decision to start seriously debating how to undermine the 14th Amendment weren’t bad enough, earlier this week an influential conservative Iowa radio host Jan Mickelson debuted a brilliant idea for how to deal with undocumented immigrants — reinstitute slavery.

On his August 17th program, Mickelson proposed putting up signs all over Iowa saying that “as of this date, 30 to 60 days from now, anyone who is in the state of Iowa who is not here legally and who cannot demonstrate their legal status to the satisfaction of the local and state authorities here in the State of Iowa, become[s] property of the State of Iowa.”

“We have a job for you,” he speculated telling the newly enslaved people of Iowa, before shifting to the practical benefits of slavery. “We start using compelled labor, the people who are here illegally would therefore be owned by the state and become an asset of the state rather than a liability and we start inventing jobs for them to do.”

If the Mexican government won’t pay to build Donald Trump’s “big, beautiful, powerful wall,” we will “‘invite’ the illegal Mexicans and illegals aliens to build it. You show up without an invitation? You get to be a construction worker!”

“If you have come across the border illegally, again give them another 60-day guideline, you need to go home and leave this jurisdiction, and if you don’t you become property of the United States, and guess what?” Mickelson asked. “You will be building a wall. We will compel your labor. You would belong to these United States. You show up without an invitation, you get to be an asset.”

When a caller later pointed out the obvious — that this “sounds an awful lot like slavery” — Mickelson replied by asking “What’s wrong with slavery?” He proceeded to claim that the real slaves were the taxpayers on whose largesse undocumented immigrants allegedly depend.

“We allow millions of people to come into the country, who aren’t here legally, and people who are here are indentured to those people to pay their bills, their education of their kids, pay for their food, their food stamps, their medical bills, in some cases even subsidize their housing, and somehow the people who own the country, who pay the bills, pay the taxes, they get indentured to the new people who are not even supposed to be here,” he said. “Isn’t that a lot like slavery?”

Geez…Compared to Ben Carson, this clown is a “moderate”. Uncle Ben wants to use drones to kill people on the border!

Ben Carson takes immigration debate to insane new low, floats drone strikes at border


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Dr Cornel West and the Politic of Hate

Cornel West on CNN


CORNEL WEST: You can’t talk about wealth and inequality, you can’t talk about education, you can’t talk about massive unemployment and under employment and you can’t talk about drones being dropped on people in other parts of the world without talking about white supremacy and its ways in which it operates. It doesn’t have to be overt. The president is right about that.

But too many black people are niggerized. I would say the first black president has become the first niggerized black president.

CNN ANCHOR: What do you mean by that?

WEST: A niggerized black person is a black person who is afraid and scared and intimidated when it comes to putting a spotlight on white supremacy and fighting against white supremacy. So when many of us said we have to fight against racism, what were we told? ‘No, he can’t deal with racism because he has other issues, political calculations. He’s the president of all America, not just black America.’ We know he’s president of all America but white supremacy is American as cherry pie.

We’re talking about moral issues, spiritual issues, emotional issues. White supremacy has nothing to do with just skin pigmentation, it has to be what kind of person you want to be, what kind of nation we want to be. Democrats and Republicans play on both of those parties in terms of running away from the vicious legacy of white supremacy until it hits us hard. Thank God for Ferguson. Thank God for the young folk of all colors. Thank God for Staten Island and fighting there. Thank God in Baltimore, now the precious folk in Charleston.

President Obama delivers the eulogy for the dead in Charleston…


RESIDENT OBAMA: Giving all praise and honor to God.


The Bible calls us to hope, to persevere and have faith in things not seen. They were still living by faith when they died, the scripture tells us.


They did not receive the things promised. They only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth.

We are here today to remember a man of God who lived by faith, a man who believed in things not seen, a man who believed there were better days ahead off in the distance, a man of service, who persevered knowing full-well he would not receive all those things he was promised, because he believed his efforts would deliver a better life for those who followed, to Jennifer, his beloved wife, Eliana and Malana, his beautiful, wonderful daughters, to the Mother Emanuel family and the people of Charleston, the people of South Carolina.

I cannot claim to have had the good fortune to know Reverend Pinckney well, but I did have the pleasure of knowing him and meeting him here in South Carolina back when we were both a little bit younger…


… back when I didn’t have visible gray hair.


The first thing I noticed was his graciousness, his smile, his reassuring baritone, his deceptive sense of humor, all qualities that helped him wear so effortlessly a heavy burden of expectation.

Friends of his remarked this week that when Clementa Pinckney entered a room, it was like the future arrived, that even from a young age, folks knew he was special, anointed. He was the progeny of a long line of the faithful, a family of preachers who spread God’s words, a family of protesters who so changed to expand voting rights and desegregate the South.

Clem heard their instruction, and he did not forsake their teaching. He was in the pulpit by 13, pastor by 18, public servant by 23. He did not exhibit any of the cockiness of youth nor youth’s insecurities. Instead, he set an example worthy of his position, wise beyond his years in his speech, in his conduct, in his love, faith and purity.

As a senator, he represented a sprawling swathe of low country, a place that has long been one of the most neglected in America, a place still racked by poverty and inadequate schools, a place where children can still go hungry and the sick can go without treatment — a place that needed somebody like Clem.


His position in the minority party meant the odds of winning more resources for his constituents were often long. His calls for greater equity were too-often unheeded. The votes he cast were sometimes lonely.

But he never gave up. He stayed true to his convictions. He would not grow discouraged. After a full day at the Capitol, he’d climb into his car and head to the church to draw sustenance from his family, from his ministry, from the community that loved and needed him. There, he would fortify his faith and imagine what might be.

Reverend Pinckney embodied a politics that was neither mean nor small. He conducted himself quietly and kindly and diligently. He encouraged progress not by pushing his ideas alone but by seeking out your ideas, partnering with you to make things happen. He was full of empathy and fellow feeling, able to walk in somebody else’s shoes and see through their eyes.

No wonder one of his Senate colleagues remembered Senator Pinckney as “the most gentle of the 46 of us, the best of the 46 of us.”

Clem was often asked why he chose to be a pastor and a public servant. But the person who asked probably didn’t know the history of AME Church.


As our brothers and sisters in the AME Church, we don’t make those distinctions. “Our calling,” Clem once said, “is not just within the walls of the congregation but the life and community in which our congregation resides.”


He embodied the idea that our Christian faith demands deeds and not just words, that the sweet hour of prayer actually lasts the whole week long, that to put our faith in action is more than just individual salvation, it’s about our collective salvation, that to feed the hungry, clothe the naked and house the homeless is not just a call for isolated charity but the imperative of a just society.

What a good man. Sometimes I think that’s the best thing to hope for when you’re eulogized, after all the words and recitations and resumes are read, to just say somebody was a good man.


You don’t have to be of high distinction to be a good man.

Preacher by 13, pastor by 18, public servant by 23. What a life Clementa Pinckney lived. What an example he set. What a model for his faith.

And then to lose him at 41, slain in his sanctuary with eight wonderful members of his flock, each at different stages in life but bound together by a common commitment to God — Cynthia Hurd, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lance, DePayne Middleton Doctor, Tywanza Sanders, Daniel L. Simmons, Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, Myra Thompson.

Good people. Decent people. God-fearing people.


People so full of life and so full of kindness, people who ran the race, who persevered, people of great faith.

To the families of the fallen, the nation shares in your grief. Our pain cuts that much deeper because it happened in a church.

The church is and always has been the center of African American life…


… a place to call our own in a too-often hostile world, a sanctuary from so many hardships.

Over the course of centuries, black churches served as hush harbors, where slaves could worship in safety, praise houses, where their free descendants could gather and shout “Hallelujah…”


… rest stops for the weary along the Underground Railroad, bunkers for the foot soldiers of the civil-rights movement.

They have been and continue to community centers, where we organize for jobs and justice, places of scholarship and network, places where children are loved and fed and kept out of harms way and told that they are beautiful and smart and taught that they matter.


That’s what happens in church. That’s what the black church means — our beating heart, the place where our dignity as a people in inviolate.

There’s no better example of this tradition than Mother Emanuel, a church…


… a church built by blacks seeking liberty, burned to the ground because its founders sought to end slavery only to rise up again, a phoenix from these ashes.


When there were laws banning all-black church gatherers, services happened here anyway in defiance of unjust laws. When there was a righteous movement to dismantle Jim Crow, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. preached from its pulpit, and marches began from its steps.

A sacred place, this church, not just for blacks, not just for Christians but for every American who cares about the steady expansion…


… of human rights and human dignity in this country, a foundation stone for liberty and justice for all.

That’s what the church meant.


We do not know whether the killer of Reverend Pinckney and eight others knew all of this history, but he surely sensed the meaning of his violent act. It was an act that drew on a long history of bombs and arson and shots fired at churches, not random but as a means of control, a way to terrorize and oppress…


… an act that he imagined would incite fear and recrimination, violence and suspicion, an act that he presumed would deepen divisions that trace back to our nation’s original sin.

Oh, but God works in mysterious ways.


God has different ideas.


He didn’t know he was being used by God.


Blinded by hatred, the alleged killer would not see the grace surrounding Reverend Pinckney and that Bible study group, the light of love that shown as they opened the church doors and invited a stranger to join in their prayer circle.

The alleged killer could have never anticipated the way the families of the fallen would respond when they saw him in court in the midst of unspeakable grief, with words of forgiveness. He couldn’t imagine that.


The alleged killer could not imagine how the city of Charleston under the good and wise leadership of Mayor Riley, how the state of South Carolina, how the United States of America would respond not merely with revulsion at his evil acts, but with (inaudible) generosity. And more importantly, with a thoughtful introspection and self-examination that we so rarely see in public life.

Blinded by hatred, he failed to comprehend what Reverend Pinckney so well understood — the power of God’s grace.


This whole week, I’ve been reflecting on this idea of grace.


The grace of the families who lost loved ones; the grace that Reverend Pinckney would preach about in his sermons; the grace described in one of my favorite hymnals, the one we all know — Amazing Grace.


How sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me.


I once was lost, but now I’m found, was blind but now I see.


According to the Christian tradition, grace is not earned. Grace is not merited. It’s not something we deserve. Rather, grace is the free and benevolent favor of God.


As manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings. Grace — as a nation out of this terrible tragedy, God has visited grace upon us for he has allowed us to see where we’ve been blind.


He’s given us the chance where we’ve been lost to find out best selves. We may not have earned this grace with our rancor and complacency and short-sightedness and fear of each other, but we got it all the same. He gave it to us anyway. He’s once more given us grace.

But it is up to us now to make the most of it, to receive it with gratitude and to prove ourselves worthy of this gift.

For too long, we were blind to the pain that the Confederate Flag stirred into many of our citizens.


It’s true a flag did not cause these murders. But as people from all walks of life, Republicans and Democrats, now acknowledge, including Governor Haley, whose recent eloquence on the subject is worthy of praise…


… as we all have to acknowledge, the flag has always represented more than just ancestral pride.


For many, black and white, that flag was a reminder of systemic oppression…


… and racial subjugation.


We see that now.

Removing the flag from this state’s capital would not be an act of political correctness. It would not an insult to the valor of Confederate soldiers. It would simply be acknowledgement that the cause for which they fought, the cause of slavery, was wrong.


The imposition of Jim Crow after the Civil War, the resistance to civil rights for all people was wrong.


It would be one step in an honest accounting of America’s history, a modest but meaningful balm for so many unhealed wounds.

It would be an expression of the amazing changes that have transformed this state and this country for the better because of the work of so many people of goodwill, people of all races, striving to form a more perfect union.

By taking down that flag, we express adds grace God’s grace.


But I don’t think God wants us to stop there.


For too long, we’ve been blind to be way past injustices continue to shape the present.


Perhaps we see that now. Perhaps this tragedy causes us to ask some tough questions about how we can permit so many of our children to languish in poverty…


… or attend dilapidated schools or grow up without prospects for a job or for a career.

Perhaps it causes us to examine what we’re doing to cause some of our children to hate.


Perhaps it softens hearts towards those lost young men, tens and tens of thousands caught up in the criminal-justice system and lead us to make sure that that system’s not infected with bias.


… that we embrace changes in how we train and equip our police so that the bonds of trust between law enforcement…


… and the communities they serve make us all safer and more secure.


Maybe we now realize the way a racial bias can infect us even when we don’t realize it so that we’re guarding against not just racial slurs but we’re also guarding against the subtle impulse to call Johnny back for a job interview but not Jamal…


… so that we search our hearts when we consider laws to make it harder for some of our fellow citizens to vote…


… by recognizing our common humanity, by treating every child as important, regardless of the color of their skin…


… or the station into which they were born and to do what’s necessary to make opportunity real for every American. By doing that, we express God’s grace.


For too long…


For too long, we’ve been blind to the unique mayhem that gun violence inflicts upon this nation.


Sporadically, our eyes are open when eight of our brothers and sisters are cut down in a church basement, 12 in a movie theater, 26 in an elementary school. But I hope we also see the 30 precious lives cut short by gun violence in this country every single day…


… the countless more whose lives are forever changed, the survivors crippled, the children traumatized and fearful every day as they walk to school, the husband who will never feel his wife’s warm touch, the entire communities whose grief overflows every time they have to watch what happened to them happening to some other place.

The vast majority of Americans, the majority of gun owners want to do something about this. We see that now.


And I’m convinced that by acknowledging the pain and loss of others, even as we respect the traditions, ways of life that make up this beloved country, by making the moral choice to change, we express God’s grace.


We don’t earn grace. We’re all sinners. We don’t deserve it.


But God gives it to us anyway.


And we choose how to receive it. It’s our decision how to honor it.

None of us can or should expect a transformation in race relations overnight. Every time something like this happens, somebody says, “We have to have a conversation about race.” We talk a lot about race.


There’s no shortcut. We don’t need more talk.


None of us should believe that a handful of gun safety measures will prevent every tragedy.

It will not. People of good will will continue to debate the merits of various policies as our democracy requires — the big, raucous place, America is. And there are good people on both sides of these debates.

Whatever solutions we find will necessarily be incomplete. But it would be a betrayal of everything Reverend Pinckney stood for, I believe, if we allow ourselves to slip into a comfortable silence again.


Once the eulogies have been delivered, once the TV cameras move on, to go back to business as usual. That’s what we so often do to avoid uncomfortable truths about the prejudice that still infects our society.


To settle for symbolic gestures without following up with the hard work of more lasting change, that’s how we lose our way again. It would be a refutation of the forgiveness expressed by those families if we merely slipped into old habits whereby those who disagree with us are not merely wrong, but bad; where we shout instead of listen; where we barricade ourselves behind preconceived notions or well-practiced cynicism.

Reverend Pinckney once said, “Across the south, we have a deep appreciation of history. We haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history.”


What is true in the south is true for America. Clem understood that justice grows out of recognition of ourselves in each other; that my liberty depends on you being free, too.


That — that history can’t be a sword to justify injustice or a shield against progress. It must be a manual for how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past, how to break the cycle, a roadway toward a better world. He knew that the path of grace involves an open mind. But more importantly, an open heart.

That’s what I felt this week — an open heart. That more than any particular policy or analysis is what’s called upon right now, I think. It’s what a friend of mine, the writer Marilyn Robinson, calls “that reservoir of goodness beyond and of another kind, that we are able to do each other in the ordinary cause of things.”

That reservoir of goodness. If we can find that grace, anything is possible.


If we can tap that grace, everything can change. Amazing grace, amazing grace.

Amazing grace…



… how sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost, but now I’m found, was blind, but now, I see.


Clementa Pinckney found that grace…


… Cynthia Hurd found that grace…


… Susie Jackson found that grace…


… Ethel Lance found that grace…


… DePayne Middleton Doctor found that grace…


… Tywanza Sanders found that grace…


… Daniel L. Simmons, Sr. found that grace…


… Sharonda Coleman-Singleton found that grace…


… Myra Thompson found that grace…


… through the example of their lives. They’ve now passed it onto us. May we find ourselves worthy of that precious and extraordinary gift as long as our lives endure.

May grace now lead them home. May God continue to shed His Grace on the United States of America.


Dr. Martin Luther King said:

“Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man’s sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.”

Think it’s time Cornel West heed those words.

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Posted by on June 28, 2015 in Giant Negros


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Prepare for “Conservageddon”!

At Nelson Mandela’s funeral today, President Obama shook hands with Raul Castro, brother of Fidel Castro, and current President of Cuba.

Get ready for some furious bloviating apoplexy from the right!

“Secret Muslim, terrorist, socialist, communist” time!



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Why You Here if You Didn’t Come to Buckdance?

Conservatives, CPAC, and that racism thing again…

Interesting the mind convolutions where people will go to to deny the truth, and make the opposite fit their racist views. Frederick Douglass as a “conservative”?

These people are a joke. An evil joke – and typical of this segment of conservatism.

Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man’s sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.

Martin Luther King Jr.
US black civil rights leader & clergyman (1929 – 1968)


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