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“Lucifer in the Flesh”…And Not the TV Kind

Coinciding with a poll resulting in Republicans having the lowest approval rating since 1992 – it seems that even Republicans don’t like Republicans anymore…

Maybe they should pass a separate bathroom law for conservatives?

Here the former Republican Speaker of the House unloads on Ted Cruz.

160428_john_boehner_AP_1160.jpg

Boehner: Cruz is ‘Lucifer in the flesh’

The former House speaker also says that he would vote for Trump, and called the two of them ‘texting buddies.’

When it comes to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, even a few months’ time out of Congress has done little to lessen former House Speaker John Boehner’s contempt for his former Capitol Hill colleague.

“Lucifer in the flesh,” Boehner told an audience at Stanford on Wednesday night, according to the Stanford Daily. “I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life.”

In fact, Wednesday night was not the first occasion that Boehner has compared Cruz to “Lucifer,” using the epithet last month during a question-and-answer session with reporters at the Futures Industry Association conference in Boca Raton, Florida.

Cruz is notorious for his toxic relationship with his congressional colleagues. It turned radioactive in 2013 when the Texas senator played a pivotal role in shutting down the federal government with his high-stakes attempt to defund Obamacare.

Republicans were widely blamed for the historic disruption, and Cruz’s colleagues heaped scorn on him as a result.

The vitriol has waned some, but Trump has gleefully exploited it, maintaining that as the standard-bearer, he can unite the party — unlike Cruz, who has little support among the people who work with him in Congress.

On Thursday, Republican Rep. Peter King seized on Boehner’s comments and again showed he’s not letting bygones be bygones over the shutdown.

“Maybe he gives Lucifer a bad name by comparing him to Ted Cruz,” King said on CNN. “Listen, what John Boehner was most concerned about was Ted Cruz perpetrated a fraud and a hoax when he brought about the shutdown of the government on some kind of a vague promise that he was gonna be able to take Obamacare out of the budget or to end Obamacare.”

 

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Muslims Take Up Arms Defending Against Armed Hate Group

A group of white right wingers seems to have forgotten that the NOI, AKA the Black Muslims aren’t exactly a group of folks you can wave your guns at and scare.

Huey P. Newton Gun Club

Armed hate group met at Texas mosque protest by gun-toting worshipers

An anti-Muslim hate group planned an armed protest at an African-American mosque in Texas — but it didn’t go as planned.

The group, the Bureau of American Islamic Relations, or BAIR, has made it a habit in the past to show up at mosques with firearms and intimidate worshipers. In November, armed protesters stalked Muslims in Irving. In December, they again stalked Muslims at the Islamic Association of North Texas.

But on Saturday, the group that makes a show of carrying guns while they surround places of worship was met in-kind at a Nation of Islam mosque in South Dallas, theDallas Morning News reports.

“This is an armed defense maneuver, making sure that our communities are safe and secure from any insurgents coming in,” Krystal Muhammad of the New Black Panther Party told Fox4 last week. Muhammad was armed with a large shotgun. “We won’t allow anybody to come in and try to intimidate our brothers and sisters.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center also lists the New Black Panther Party as a hate group.

On Saturday, the BAIR showed up and was outnumbered by members of black self-defense groups, Fox4 reported.

The Nation of Islam was joined by the Panthers and the Huey P. Newton Gun Club in its defense of the mosque.

“We will not allow them to come to South Dallas with arms and intimidate our people,” Yafeuh Balogun, spokesman for the Huey P. Newton Gun Club, told Fox4 last week. “We’re taking a defensive posture, but we’re not threatening anyone.”

“It’s a people’s victory here in South Dallas today,” he said Saturday after BAIR left without incident.

 
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Posted by on April 3, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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The New Civil War Rages in NOLA Over confederate Symbols

The defenders of the flag confederate have responded to the New Orleans City Council plan to move some of the confederate memorials in the city into a historical area or park in the usual manner. Death threats, assaults, burning, and vandalism. Indeed the same sort of actions which led they and their flag to be reviled by peaceful, law abiding, moral people in the first place.

Seems to me there is a fairly simple solution to the problem. Instead of carefully dissembling and moving said monuments…Destroy them. A crane and a wrecking ball, or large excavator can pretty much render said memorials to gravel and metal scrap in a matter of minutes. With the added city benefit of being less than 1/6th the cost of hiring a crew to move the objects.

Removal of Confederate symbols turns ugly in New Orleans

Backlash against a plan to remove prominent Confederate monuments in New Orleans has been tinged by death threats, intimidation and even what may have been the torching of a contractor’s Lamborghini.

For now, at least, things have gotten so nasty the city hasn’t found a contractor willing to bear the risk of tearing down the monuments. The city doesn’t have its own equipment to move them and is now in talks to find a company, even discussing doing the work at night to avoid further tumult.

Initially, it appeared the monuments would be removed quickly after the majority black City Council on Dec. 17 voted 6-1 to approve the mayor’s plan to take them down. The monuments, including towering figures of Gens. Robert E. Lee and P.G.T. Beauregard, have long been viewed by many here as symbols of racism and white supremacy.

The backlash is not surprising to Bill Quigley, a Loyola University law professor and longtime civil rights activist in New Orleans who’s worked on behalf of a group demanding the monuments come down.

The South has seen such resistance before, during fights over school integration and efforts in the early 1990s to racially integrate Carnival parades in New Orleans.

“Fighting in the courts, fighting in the legislature, anonymous intimidation,” Quigley said. “These are from the same deck of cards that are used to stop all social change.”

For all its reputation as a party city of fun and frolic, New Orleans is no stranger to social change and the tensions that come with it. It was the site of an early attempt to challenge racial segregation laws in the Plessy vs. Ferguson case and home to then-6-year-old Ruby Bridges whose battle to integrate her elementary school was immortalized in a Norman Rockwell painting.

New Orleans is a majority African-American city although the number of black residents has fallen since 2005’s Hurricane Katrina drove many people from the city. Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who proposed the monuments’ removal, rode to victory twice with overwhelming support from the city’s black residents.

Nationally, the debate over Confederate symbols has become heated since nine parishioners were killed at a black church in South Carolina in June.South Carolina removed the Confederate flag from its statehouse grounds in the weeks after, and several Southern cities have since considered removing monuments.

“There is no doubt that there is a huge amount of rage over the attack on Confederate symbols,” said Mark Potok with the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based group that tracks extremist activity.

His group counted about 360 pro-Confederate battle flag rallies across the nation in the six months after the church shootings. Such rallies were rare before then, he said.

In New Orleans, things have turned particularly ugly.

In early January, as it beat back legal challenges seeking to stop the removal, the city hired a contractor to remove the monuments.

But H&O Investments LLC. of Baton Rouge soon pulled out of the job, citing death threats, “unkindly name-calling,” outrage on social media and the threat of other businesses canceling contracts.

One day, several protesters came while H&O workers took measurements. Some of the protesters wore materials “with affiliation to white supremacy groups,” said Roy Maughan Jr., a lawyer for the contractor.

That same day, Maughan said, “a specific articulated threat” was phoned into city authorities warning workers at the monuments to leave for their safety. On Jan. 12, H&O sent the city a letter saying it was dropping out.

Then, on Jan. 19, a Lamborghini belonging to the owner of H&O Investments was set on fire. The sports car was parked outside his office near Baton Rouge, Maughan said.

A national rental crane company the city had hoped to hire also refused to be involved.

The FBI and local fire investigators declined to comment. No arrests have been made.

 

 
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Posted by on March 25, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Why the Right Hates Ethnic History

Studies have shown that including Ethnic Studies as part of the core curriculum has a secondary effect of improving overall participation and academic achievement. Of course the usual Republican right wing racist suspects don’t like that…

The Ongoing Battle Over Ethnic Studies

A new study suggests that such courses can dramatically elevate the achievement of at-risk students. But is that enough proof that they’re worth the investment?

In Tucson, Arizona, Che Guevara posters and Paulo Freire’s The Pedagogy of the Oppressed are the spark that set off a heated conflict over ethnic studies that has made national headlines for years. For critics, including two former state schools superintendents, the Mexican American studies program in the Tucson Unified School District is little more than divisive propaganda: “ethnic chauvinism” with a “very toxic effect … in an educational setting.” For supporters, reading literature on Chicano history in America and critical race theory is intended to close cultural gaps in the curriculum—and to close academic gaps for the district’s Hispanic students.

The intense controversy in Tucson over ethnic studies—best described as the study of the social, political, economic, and historical perspectives of America’s diverse racial and ethnic groups—might seem like a new debate, but it’s over a century in the making. The educator and historian W.E.B. DuBois as early as the 1900s called for teaching black history in U.S. schools to challenge the prevailing narrative of black inferiority. More than half a century later, Freedom Schoolsemerged out of the 1960s civil-rights movement as alternative schools with a curriculum steeped in black culture and lessons drawn from black students’ lived experiences. About the same time the discipline of ethnic studies ignited on college campuses, as students of color considered the Eurocentric dominance in textbooks and lessons, and demanded multicultural courses.

Eventually the concept trickled down to K-12 schools. In 1994, Berkeley High in California became one of the first high schools in the country to offer ethnic studies, the program facing opposition even in a town known to be a bastion of progressive thinking. More recently, Los Angeles, the nation’s second-largest school district, added an ethnic-studies course to its high-school graduation requirements. (Interestingly, the country’s higher-education pioneer in the field is now struggling to stay afloat as budget cuts threaten the small, iconic program at San Francisco State University.)

For more than 20 years ethnic studies in American public schools has slowly evolved and grown, with the value for students becoming clearer over time. Yet even as enthusiasts have called for more ethnic-studies programs—and the debate rages on over making the identities of black, Asian, Native American, and Latino students the centerpiece of class instruction—notably absent was data linking culturally relevant pedagogy specifically to measurable student gains. This changed this year with new research that shows ethnic-studies classes boost student attendance, GPAs, and high-school credits for a key student group—a pivotal finding that brings hard evidence to the dispute over adding these courses in public schools….Read the Rest Here

 

 

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9 Republicans Vote Against Naming a Post Office for Maya Angelou

Now…These were the guys a few years ago who were trying to name every rest stop and bat room on the nation’s interstate after Ronnie Raygun.

Yet another example of the racism, and racial pettiness of the Republican right…

Maya Angelou at Howard

9 Republicans Vote Against Naming Post Office After Maya Angelou

On Tuesday, several Republican members of the House of Representatives voted against renaming a post office in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, after Maya Angelou, an acclaimed writer and civil-rights activist. The measure ended up passing with 371 votes,with nine Republicans voting against the bill, and one voting present.

One lawmaker cited communism for his vote.

“Congressman Harris voted against the Maya Angelou post office naming because she was a communist sympathizer,” a spokeswoman for Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD), told NBC News. “His parents escaped communism and he feels that he cannot vote to name a post office in the United States in honor of someone who supported the communist Castro revolution in Cuba.”

Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) said in a statement that “naming post offices is one of the most benign and bipartisan duties we perform in the House of Representatives, and there is rarely any opposition,” and that he was “shocked today as nine Republicans voted against naming a post office after Maya Angelou, indisputably one of our country’s greatest poets, authors and civil rights activists.”

Angelou, who passed away in 2014, left behind a legacy of fighting against segregation and apartheid. She also supported Democratic candidates such as Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama.

The other eight Republicans include congressmen Ken Buck (CO), Mo Brooks (AL), Michael Burgess (TX), Jeff Duncan (SC), Glenn Grothman (WI), Thomas Massie (KY), Alex Mooney (WV), and Steven Palazzo (MS).

An ongoing campaign in the area posting “not welcome” signs at local businesses for Andy Harris

 

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Louis Farrakhan praises Donald Trump

Didn’t see that one coming…Apparently Farrakhan’s hatred of Jews outweighs his common sense…

Louis Farrakhan praises Donald Trump

Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan praised Republican front-runner Donald Trump for refusing donations from Jewish groups.

Trump “is the only member who has stood in front of the Jewish community and said ‘I don’t want your money,’” Farrakhan said in a sermon he delivered this week. “Any time a man can say to those who control the politics of America, ‘I don’t want your money,’ that means you can’t control me. And they can’t afford to give up control of the presidents of the United States.”

Despite his commendation for the billionaire businessman, Farrakhan did not endorse him. “Not that I’m for Mr. Trump,” he added, “but I like what I’m looking at.”

Farrakhan also called Jews the “Synagogue of Satan,” according to the Anti-Defamation League, which monitors anti-Semitic statements.

In December, Trump appeared before a crowd of leading Jewish Republicans and told them, “You’re not going to support me even though I’ll be the best guy for Israel.”

“I’m a negotiator like you folks,” he also said. “Is there anyone in this room who doesn’t negotiate deals? … Probably more than any room I’ve ever spoken.”

 

 

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The Nexus between Islamophobia and Racism

For a long time non-black Islamics ran away from other minority groups, especially black folks. Indeed after the Shah of Iran fell and Iranians emigrated to the US, their political arm lobbied Congress to be classified as white. Arabic people are classified as white in the US. What Muslims have since learned is like the way Jews were treated in this country for a long time, what you are classified as, and what bigots in America see you as are two very different things.

This writer suggests that Muslim people join in the struggle along side other minority groups.

Don’t Worry!

The Entanglement of Islamophobia and Anti-Black Violence

Social justice activists working on issues related to Islamophobia must intensify their efforts to align with activists focused on anti-Black violence.

Blacks form a large portion of the Muslim population in the United States. Muslims from Pakistan, India, the Middle East, etc. who joined them later and/or who are now first or second-generation Americans, however, have maintained separate spaces of worship and recreation. This has created fissures within the American Muslim community along the lines of race and ethnicity – in addition to differences of interpretation of Islam.

In fact, there have been moments when non-Black Muslims have actively sought to set themselves apart from their Black brothers and sisters in order to partake in the racial hierarchy. South Asian Muslims, for instance, have benefited from being marked as a ‘model-minority;’ Iranian Muslims from passing as White. Others have benefited from labels such as ‘moderate or progressive Muslims.’

This self-segregation by non-Black and/or immigrant Muslims can also be read as a mode of self-preservation as they struggled to establish themselves in a new host nation. However, such actions are no longer tenable.

Non-Black Muslims in the United States, like myself, have to understand that our everyday experiences of Islamophobia today are intimately linked with the racism that our Black brothers and sisters have been experiencing for centuries.

To understand this connection, we have to first recognize how racial discrimination operates and how marginalization is an effect of institutional practices.

‘Race’ is a social construction – that is, bodies that look differently (complexion, phenotype, etc.) have historically been categorized and placed into different buckets (namely black, white, brown, etc.) as part of a societal consensus.

This social production of race entails placing certain bodies in superior positions when compared to others (such as Whites over Blacks). It also includes allocating particular characteristics to legitimize such placements (Asians are hardworking; Muslims are backward, etc.). These characteristics are often presented as ‘natural.’

For this hierarchy to be maintained day after day, a range of institutional practices and structures have to reproduce it constantly. These include policing, schooling, gentrification, employment policies, etc. Together, these practices limit the opportunity set available to Blacks, for instance, and hence reproduce the cycle of poverty and marginalization.

There is no conspiracy here – marginalization is an effect of a large number of unjust practices that work together day after day.

Thus, the oft-repeated slogan that ‘Blacks are criminals, look at the crime rates’ only points to the effect of what happens when a people are systematicallymarginalized and discriminated against. If this happened to Brown people or White people then they, too, would experience similar lived realities.

Marginalization of Blacks, hence, is a social and political process and has to be understood as such.

So why should non-Black Muslims care about racism and anti-Black violence? Because the very marginalizations that Muslims are feeling today in the era of Trump – the everyday racism, bullying, violent attacks – are part of the larger institutional processes that keep non-Whites at the periphery. Because Islamophobia is yet another aspect of structural oppression – oppression of Blacks, Latinos, women, disabled people, sexual minorities, etc.

Islamophobia, therefore, can never be understood – let alone addressed – if we do not understand how systemic oppression works.

Non-Black Muslims (and look-alikes, such as Sikhs and Hindus) have, of course, experienced racism before the recent GOP fear mongering. What is different today is the loud call to unite with other marginalized groups.

Anti-Islamophobia work must not erase the anti-racism struggles of Black American Muslims. In fact, good allyship entails sharing privileges, knowledges, and working together towards racial justice.

 

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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