Tag Archives: black republican

Georgia Black Republican Learns the Hard Way

What part of Trump is a racist doesn’t penetrate the pickle-headed ninnies brains?

Winning the first BTx3 “Dumbest Negro of the Week” award.

Dumb Black Republican

Black Georgia GOP official booted from Atlanta Trump event with no explanation

A rising star with the Georgia Republican Party was barred from a meet and greet with presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump at the candidate’s rally in Atlanta on June 15.

According to BuzzFeed’s Darren Sands, Michael McNeely was proceeding with other high-ranking Georgia Republicans to meet with the real estate tycoon backstage when he was intercepted by the Secret Service and hustled out of theater.

Multiple witnesses saw Trump’s Georgia campaign director Brandon Phillips stop McNeely and tell him there was “no more room for you” backstage with Mr. Trump. A Georgia GOP official reported the incident to BuzzFeed but asked that their name not be used since they are not authorized to speak on behalf of the party.

When Sands attempted to reach McNeely for comment, McNeely hastily said, “I’ll have to get back to you,” then never returned calls or issued a statement.

The Trump campaign, the Georgia Republican Party and Phillips have all declined to address the incident.

McNeely — a former chair of the Georgia Black Republican Council — was chosen by the GOP to act as an at-large delegate to the 2016 Republican National Convention.

It’s unclear, BuzzFeed said, why McNeely was ejected from the event.

Bruce LeVell, the executive director of the National Diversity Coalition For Trump said that he was not aware of any official reason why McNeely wouldn’t be allowed to meet with the candidate, but that campaign staff sometimes act proactively to prevent problems.

“Anyone that goes to a Trump rally, I don’t give a damn who you are, if anyone even if looks at you and [the campaign] points their finger, you’re out of there,” he said. “They’re real strict about [acting] if something doesn’t look right. They just make a judgment call.”

In March, a group of 30 black students were removed from a Trump rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA. The students were reportedly standing silently in the bleachers, but were asked to leave.

“We didn’t plan to do anything,” said Tahjila Davis, a 19-year-old mass media major. “They said, ‘This is Trump’s property; it’s a private event.’ But I paid my tuition to be here.”



Posted by on June 21, 2016 in Black Conservatives


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Whoops! Trump’s “My African American”…Isn’t

Looks like the Underground Railroad has claimed another one from the Trump Plantation.

Cheadle, a Republican candidate in a California congressional race, said he was using a “Veterans For Trump” sign to shield his head from the sun…

Trump’s ‘my African-American’ admits ‘I am not a Trump supporter’

Gregory Cheadle aka Trump's "My African-American"  (Photo: Facebook)A California congressional candidate Gregory Cheadle might be an anti-government Tea Party member, but don’t call him a Trump supporter.

In a weekend interview with NPR, Cheadle admitted that he was holding the “Veterans for Trump” sign, not as support, but rather, to block the bright sun at the outdoor rally.

Trump singled Cheadle out at the California rally Friday, touching off a storm of criticism for placing ownership on the man when Trump called him “my African-American.” In the interviews that followed, Cheadle graciously accepted the fame and honor of the attention, but it was the most recent one where he admitted he’s not actually a supporter.

“Trump talked about the racism, the stereotypical racism targeted against black men by bringing that incident out,” Cheadle said. “He said the people near where the incident took place were about to jump on the black man because they thought he was a protester when in reality he was a supporter.”

He explained he wasn’t offended by Trump’s statement because the presumptive GOP nominee was speaking positively about black people prior to singling him out. “People around me were laughing [at the fact] that he noticed me and everybody was happy. It was a jovial thing.”

“Had he said, ‘here’s my African American friend’ or ‘my African American supporter’ or something like that, then there would be less ambiguity,” Cheadle said.

“I am not a Trump supporter,” he continued. “I went to go hear Donald Trump because I have an open mind.”

He further said that he’s not tied to any particular party, despite being registered as a Republican candidate for the first congressional district.

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Posted by on June 6, 2016 in Black Conservatives, The Clown Bus


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Dumb Black Conservative of the Week – Porn on Campaign Site

Black conservative gettin’ frea-ky!

When you do a Screen Shot of you computer to put up on your Campaign Website…

It’s usually a good idea to have someone check it over for errors, mistakes…Or Porn Sites you are visiting!

NOT like Mike Webb, a Northern Virginia Black Republican Congressional Candidate.

Uhhhhhhh. Check out the First Two tabs….”Layla Rivera Tight Body”…And “Ivone Sexy Amateur”?

Congressional Candidate Appears to Post Embarrassing Screen Shot to Facebook

A Virginia congressional candidate published a lengthy Facebook post Monday in an attempt to prove he received a prank phone call regarding a job offer — but in doing so he may have divulged a little too much information about himself.

Mike Webb, who is reportedly running for Congress as an independent in Virginia after a failed Republican primary, posted a series of screenshots to his campaign’s Facebook page as he argued that he received a prank call about a job opportunity. But along with photos of his phone bill, he included a screenshot of his browser with two tabs that appear to be porn sites.

One tab reads “Ivone Sexy Amateur” and the other tab shows only “Layla Rivera Tight” before the rest is cut off. A Google search shows that both women are in the porn industry. Rivera, for example, has apparently appeared in more than 200 adult films and has received several awards.

Despite multiple comments from Facebook users, the post remained on the Webb campaign’s Facebook page for several hours Monday. As of 5 p.m., it was still public.

In the post, Webb details his experience with the prank phone call he received while searching for a job. He claimed that after he received an invitation to interview at Curzon Staffing Agency in Alexandria, he called the receptionist at a later time to confirm the interview.

Webb then says that after he arrived on time for the interview he was told by the receptionist that the person who arranged the interview “was not employed by that firm.” In his post, Webb specifically named Matt Wavro, an Arlington County GOP officer, and hinted that he may be involved in the prank. Webb has repeatedly blamed local establishment Republicans for his primary loss, reported.

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Posted by on May 18, 2016 in Black Conservatives


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Jackie Robinson – And When the Republican Party Went South

There has been a lot of effort extended by conservatives to rehabilitate Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater’s record and stances. Until Goldwater, the Republican Party had strong support among black folk and other minorities. Goldwater’s assertion that the Civil Rights Bill wasn’t needed sent the Republican Party off the abyss and led to Nixon’s “Southern Strategy”. It was in Goldwater’s presidential run in 1964 that the Republican Party became the racial cesspool we have today. As a kid, I remember the “AuH2O” bumper stickers and other items, and all along a campaign more driven by race than any “principles”.

When Jackie Robinson Confronted a Trump-Like Candidate

At its core, Barry Goldwater’s campaign threatened blacks’ ability to fully engage in a two-party system.

The Press Interviews Jackie Robinson at 1964 Republican Convention

“The danger of the Republican party being taken over by the lily-white-ist conservatives is more serious than many people realize,” Jackie Robinson cautioned in his syndicated column in August 1963. He was worried about the rise of Barry Goldwater, whose 1964 presidential bid laid the foundation for the modern conservative movement. Today, Goldwater’s shadow looms over Donald Trump’s campaign for the Republican Party’s nomination.

“During my life, I have had a few nightmares which happened to me while I was wide awake,” Robinson wrote in 1967. “One of them was the National Republican Convention in San Francisco, which produced the greatest disaster the Republican Party has ever known—Nominee Barry Goldwater.” Robinson, a loyal Republican who campaigned for Richard Nixon in 1960, was shocked and saddened by the racism and lack of civility he witnessed at the 1964 convention. As the historian Leah Wright Rigueur describes in The Loneliness of the Black Republican, black delegates were verbally assaulted and threatened with violence by Goldwater supporters. William Young, a Pennsylvania delegate, had his suit set on fire and was told to “keep in your own place” by his assailant. “They call you ‘nigger,’ push you and step on your feet,” New Jersey delegate George Fleming told the Associated Press. “I had to leave to keep my self-respect.”

The 1964 campaign was pivotal for Republicans because, despite Goldwater’s loss, the GOP came away with a dedicated network of people willing to work between election cycles to build the party. The GOP has won more presidential elections than it has lost since Goldwater. Donald Trump’s campaign plays on fears and resentments similar to those that fueled Goldwater’s presidential bid five decades ago. It is not yet clear, however, how this strategy will play out with an electorate that will be the most racially and ethnically diverse in U.S. history (over 30 percent of eligible voters will be racial or ethnic minorities).

As the Draft Goldwater campaign expanded in early 1963, the editors at the Chicago Defender warned that Goldwater’s “brand of demagoguery has a special appeal to ultra conservative Republicans” and that he “cannot be laughed off as a serious possibility as is being done in some quarters unfriendly to him.” After the 1964 Republican National Convention, the Defender suggested, “Goldwater in the White House would be a nightmare from which the nation and the world would not soon recover.” Another editorial two days later struck a stronger tone: “The conviction is universal that Goldwater represents the most diabolical force that has ever captured the leadership of the Republican Party. After 108 years of exhortation to freedom, liberty, and justice, the GOP now becomes the label under which Fascism is oozed into the mainstream of American politics.”

Recalling the applause line in Goldwater’s acceptance speech—“Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue”—the Defender argued, “Goldwater’s extremist pronouncement is an invitation to violence and race riots.” On the eve of the election, Defender editors wrote that Goldwater “is in a frantic search for an issue that can stir the voter to an emotional pitch.  He tries to frighten the people into believing the country is not in safe hands.” (These and other editorials cited here can be found at Black Quotidian, a digital archive of black newspapers.)

In 1964, unlike 2016, it was not a foregone conclusion that the vast majority of black voters would support the Democratic Party. Republicans Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon received 39 percent and 32 percent of the black vote in the 1956 and 1960 presidential elections, compared to 6 percent for Goldwater in 1964. No Republican candidate since Goldwater has earned support from more than 15 percent of black voters….Read The Rest Here


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Trevor Noah – Ben Carson – Rupert Murdoch

Ow! That one is going to leave a mark!

Meanwhile uber old white guy declares Ben Carson’s authenticity as a black man…

Rupert Murdoch tweeted that Ben Carson would make a good president in a peculiar way. “Ben and Candy Carson terrific. What about a real black President who can properly address the racial divide? And much else,” he wrote Wednesday, suggesting that President Obama is not that. The media mogul’s comments sparked a firestorm online, to which he later responded by recommending a New York magazine article asking whether Obama had done enough to support the black community.


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Posted by on October 8, 2015 in Black Conservatives, The Clown Bus


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As the World Sees America…Uncle Ben Carson

Just a few salient points about Dr Carson. Seems he has forgotten a lot of things while spending life in the bubble at that hospital surrounded by intern and student doctor fawning sycophants. That seems easy to do for some folks. I wonder if the good doctor ever volunteered with folks like Doctors Without Borders?

Get out there in the real world and it will put your ego in check real fast.

Why does the only black presidential candidate insist the US is post-racial?

It’s not racist, or even controversial, to point out that black people in the US face systemic hardships and prejudices, from increased poverty rates to higher police brutality. But as that observation, notably via the Black Lives Matter movement, has begun to attain broader attention and more influence, the only serious black candidate for president seems determined to push the discussion out of the spotlight.

Ben Carson, a Republican candidate for president, is stumping with language that underplays the need to talk about race in this country, decrying “purveyors of hatred who take every single incident between people of two races and try to make a race war out of it” at the first Republican debate.

This sort of language presupposes that the likes of black activists interrupting Bernie Sanders makes them troublemakers who can’t see beyond race. That is, in this logic, it makes Black Lives Matters members racist.

It’s an old conservative talking point that those who “see” race and agitate for racial justice are the “real racists.” But because this rhetoric has long drawn criticisms of racism for the Republican Party, it’s a small wonder that a black candidate supporting the old cause is making Carson a conservative darling.

During his August 12 campaign trip to Harlem, New York to promote “self-reliance,” Carson said black Americans must realize that “there is a way to go that will lead to upward mobility as opposed to dependency, and let’s talk about that way, and let’s not be satisfied to be patted on the head and kept like a pet.” Carson was referencing the conservative “welfare queen” contention – that poor, black Americans have chosen the easy malaise of economic dependence over bootstrapping their way to the middle class.

While touting “self-reliance” as a form of individual empowerment, Carson is de-emphasizing race and ignoring racism as a powerful social force that constrains people and limits their choices, instead redirecting the conversation America could – and is starting to – have on race to one of morality.

That is, his supposedly populist call for empowering the black community to rise beyond economic circumstances and become independent, is really trotting out the old Bill Cosby line that black communities have chosen poverty over success or dependency over mobility. “Those whole value systems, the values and principles that created strong families and gave people that kind of foundation that they needed to resist the influences on the street – those are not there anymore,” he said during his Harlem campaign stop.

But black people in America face structural barriers to achievement that begin with crowded and underfunded schools followed by a pay gap between them and their white peers regardless of the educational level they attain. When a black man minimizes this to endear him to his target base, it just makes it harder for everyone else who doesn’t have the luxury of denying pervasive truths. Carson places an unfair distance not just between himself and potential voters but between disadvantaged communities and the voting process. Why go out and vote when politicians use your community as an example of what’s “wrong” with America?

While his supporters may find his brand of “raceless” individualism and self-reliance to be compelling, communities of color – which must contend not only with the disempowering effects of structural racism but also with politicians encouraging self-blame and decontextualized “bootstraps” pathology as the path to liberation – have little reason to support Carson or any of his peers at the polls.

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Posted by on September 1, 2015 in Black Conservatives


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Black Cons Leaving Republican Plantation…

To be a Black Republican has always taken a cast iron stomach. The principal function of black conservatives is a front men, to be placed in visible positions for the press to provide plausible deniability to the Republican racism issue.

While both parties have their requisite numbers of hotheads, racists, and morons – the Republican hog has fed at the trough of racial animosity since the days of Raygun. The penalty for that has been the evolution of a Party dominated by small minds, and even smaller morality. If you don’t believe that, look at the assorted weak sisters and mental midgets which now dominate the Republican wannabe President list. The salient point here being “wannabe”.

It’s not about America anymore, it is about special interest groups and “the base”, which in the case of the Tea Party which now dominates the Republican body politic is hardly distinguishable from the Third KKK or the German American Bund.

I think the key point here is that the flocks of folks deserting the sinking ship aren’t suddenly coming to their senses and becoming progressives – what they are becoming is “not-Republicans”. They are holding on to a conservative dream which has been sold down the river so many times…

They are left in an ocean of disappointment.

The latest escapees? Black conservatives, tired of holding that lantern out there on the lawn.


Former "Black Republican", now Independent, Ken Barnes

Viewpoints: Racist cartoon of Obama forces me to leave GOP

I was one of those rare species: a black Republican, the guy willing to spit into the wind of conventional thought, who was often showcased on camera at party events to prove inclusiveness.

But as a proud black man, I can no longer be a member of the Republican Party.

Being a Republican has long been a part of my personal and professional identities, so leaving the party is a difficult and emotional decision.

In 1998, as a young man searching for what I believed were shared values, I cut ties with the Democratic Party and became a Republican. Democrats, in my view, had become unwelcoming to those holding center-right views not in lockstep with the party, and it was my belief that through hard work, the Republican Party could be utilized as a vehicle for improving our community.

For the next 13 years, I dedicated myself to growing the conservative base of the Republican Party, and in the process bound myself in emotion and deed.

During that time, I worked on behalf of Republican candidates at all levels, from presidential and gubernatorial campaigns, on down to local elections.

I have had the pleasure of serving as president of the Sacramento Republican Assembly, a term as a member of the California Republican Party executive committee, and most recently as treasurer of the Sacramento County Republican Party.

Last year alone, I donated more than 400 hours of my time to the Republican Party and made financial contributions to a number of Republican candidates.

As of late, however, when I look at myself in the mirror there is one question which perplexes me: Can I, in good conscience, remain affiliated with an organization whose message purveyors of racism and bigotry find attractive? Read the rest of this entry »


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