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Jackie Robinson – And When the Republican Party Went South

There has been a lot of effort extended by conservatives to rehabilitate Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater’s record and stances. Until Goldwater, the Republican Party had strong support among black folk and other minorities. Goldwater’s assertion that the Civil Rights Bill wasn’t needed sent the Republican Party off the abyss and led to Nixon’s “Southern Strategy”. It was in Goldwater’s presidential run in 1964 that the Republican Party became the racial cesspool we have today. As a kid, I remember the “AuH2O” bumper stickers and other items, and all along a campaign more driven by race than any “principles”.

When Jackie Robinson Confronted a Trump-Like Candidate

At its core, Barry Goldwater’s campaign threatened blacks’ ability to fully engage in a two-party system.

The Press Interviews Jackie Robinson at 1964 Republican Convention

“The danger of the Republican party being taken over by the lily-white-ist conservatives is more serious than many people realize,” Jackie Robinson cautioned in his syndicated column in August 1963. He was worried about the rise of Barry Goldwater, whose 1964 presidential bid laid the foundation for the modern conservative movement. Today, Goldwater’s shadow looms over Donald Trump’s campaign for the Republican Party’s nomination.

“During my life, I have had a few nightmares which happened to me while I was wide awake,” Robinson wrote in 1967. “One of them was the National Republican Convention in San Francisco, which produced the greatest disaster the Republican Party has ever known—Nominee Barry Goldwater.” Robinson, a loyal Republican who campaigned for Richard Nixon in 1960, was shocked and saddened by the racism and lack of civility he witnessed at the 1964 convention. As the historian Leah Wright Rigueur describes in The Loneliness of the Black Republican, black delegates were verbally assaulted and threatened with violence by Goldwater supporters. William Young, a Pennsylvania delegate, had his suit set on fire and was told to “keep in your own place” by his assailant. “They call you ‘nigger,’ push you and step on your feet,” New Jersey delegate George Fleming told the Associated Press. “I had to leave to keep my self-respect.”

The 1964 campaign was pivotal for Republicans because, despite Goldwater’s loss, the GOP came away with a dedicated network of people willing to work between election cycles to build the party. The GOP has won more presidential elections than it has lost since Goldwater. Donald Trump’s campaign plays on fears and resentments similar to those that fueled Goldwater’s presidential bid five decades ago. It is not yet clear, however, how this strategy will play out with an electorate that will be the most racially and ethnically diverse in U.S. history (over 30 percent of eligible voters will be racial or ethnic minorities).

As the Draft Goldwater campaign expanded in early 1963, the editors at the Chicago Defender warned that Goldwater’s “brand of demagoguery has a special appeal to ultra conservative Republicans” and that he “cannot be laughed off as a serious possibility as is being done in some quarters unfriendly to him.” After the 1964 Republican National Convention, the Defender suggested, “Goldwater in the White House would be a nightmare from which the nation and the world would not soon recover.” Another editorial two days later struck a stronger tone: “The conviction is universal that Goldwater represents the most diabolical force that has ever captured the leadership of the Republican Party. After 108 years of exhortation to freedom, liberty, and justice, the GOP now becomes the label under which Fascism is oozed into the mainstream of American politics.”

Recalling the applause line in Goldwater’s acceptance speech—“Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue”—the Defender argued, “Goldwater’s extremist pronouncement is an invitation to violence and race riots.” On the eve of the election, Defender editors wrote that Goldwater “is in a frantic search for an issue that can stir the voter to an emotional pitch.  He tries to frighten the people into believing the country is not in safe hands.” (These and other editorials cited here can be found at Black Quotidian, a digital archive of black newspapers.)

In 1964, unlike 2016, it was not a foregone conclusion that the vast majority of black voters would support the Democratic Party. Republicans Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon received 39 percent and 32 percent of the black vote in the 1956 and 1960 presidential elections, compared to 6 percent for Goldwater in 1964. No Republican candidate since Goldwater has earned support from more than 15 percent of black voters….Read The Rest Here

 

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Trevor Noah – Ben Carson – Rupert Murdoch

Ow! That one is going to leave a mark!

Meanwhile uber old white guy declares Ben Carson’s authenticity as a black man…

Rupert Murdoch tweeted that Ben Carson would make a good president in a peculiar way. “Ben and Candy Carson terrific. What about a real black President who can properly address the racial divide? And much else,” he wrote Wednesday, suggesting that President Obama is not that. The media mogul’s comments sparked a firestorm online, to which he later responded by recommending a New York magazine article asking whether Obama had done enough to support the black community.

 

 
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Posted by on October 8, 2015 in Black Conservatives, The Clown Bus

 

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As the World Sees America…Uncle Ben Carson

Just a few salient points about Dr Carson. Seems he has forgotten a lot of things while spending life in the bubble at that hospital surrounded by intern and student doctor fawning sycophants. That seems easy to do for some folks. I wonder if the good doctor ever volunteered with folks like Doctors Without Borders?

Get out there in the real world and it will put your ego in check real fast.

Why does the only black presidential candidate insist the US is post-racial?

It’s not racist, or even controversial, to point out that black people in the US face systemic hardships and prejudices, from increased poverty rates to higher police brutality. But as that observation, notably via the Black Lives Matter movement, has begun to attain broader attention and more influence, the only serious black candidate for president seems determined to push the discussion out of the spotlight.

Ben Carson, a Republican candidate for president, is stumping with language that underplays the need to talk about race in this country, decrying “purveyors of hatred who take every single incident between people of two races and try to make a race war out of it” at the first Republican debate.

This sort of language presupposes that the likes of black activists interrupting Bernie Sanders makes them troublemakers who can’t see beyond race. That is, in this logic, it makes Black Lives Matters members racist.

It’s an old conservative talking point that those who “see” race and agitate for racial justice are the “real racists.” But because this rhetoric has long drawn criticisms of racism for the Republican Party, it’s a small wonder that a black candidate supporting the old cause is making Carson a conservative darling.

During his August 12 campaign trip to Harlem, New York to promote “self-reliance,” Carson said black Americans must realize that “there is a way to go that will lead to upward mobility as opposed to dependency, and let’s talk about that way, and let’s not be satisfied to be patted on the head and kept like a pet.” Carson was referencing the conservative “welfare queen” contention – that poor, black Americans have chosen the easy malaise of economic dependence over bootstrapping their way to the middle class.

While touting “self-reliance” as a form of individual empowerment, Carson is de-emphasizing race and ignoring racism as a powerful social force that constrains people and limits their choices, instead redirecting the conversation America could – and is starting to – have on race to one of morality.

That is, his supposedly populist call for empowering the black community to rise beyond economic circumstances and become independent, is really trotting out the old Bill Cosby line that black communities have chosen poverty over success or dependency over mobility. “Those whole value systems, the values and principles that created strong families and gave people that kind of foundation that they needed to resist the influences on the street – those are not there anymore,” he said during his Harlem campaign stop.

But black people in America face structural barriers to achievement that begin with crowded and underfunded schools followed by a pay gap between them and their white peers regardless of the educational level they attain. When a black man minimizes this to endear him to his target base, it just makes it harder for everyone else who doesn’t have the luxury of denying pervasive truths. Carson places an unfair distance not just between himself and potential voters but between disadvantaged communities and the voting process. Why go out and vote when politicians use your community as an example of what’s “wrong” with America?

While his supporters may find his brand of “raceless” individualism and self-reliance to be compelling, communities of color – which must contend not only with the disempowering effects of structural racism but also with politicians encouraging self-blame and decontextualized “bootstraps” pathology as the path to liberation – have little reason to support Carson or any of his peers at the polls.

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2015 in Black Conservatives

 

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Black Cons Leaving Republican Plantation…

To be a Black Republican has always taken a cast iron stomach. The principal function of black conservatives is a front men, to be placed in visible positions for the press to provide plausible deniability to the Republican racism issue.

While both parties have their requisite numbers of hotheads, racists, and morons – the Republican hog has fed at the trough of racial animosity since the days of Raygun. The penalty for that has been the evolution of a Party dominated by small minds, and even smaller morality. If you don’t believe that, look at the assorted weak sisters and mental midgets which now dominate the Republican wannabe President list. The salient point here being “wannabe”.

It’s not about America anymore, it is about special interest groups and “the base”, which in the case of the Tea Party which now dominates the Republican body politic is hardly distinguishable from the Third KKK or the German American Bund.

I think the key point here is that the flocks of folks deserting the sinking ship aren’t suddenly coming to their senses and becoming progressives – what they are becoming is “not-Republicans”. They are holding on to a conservative dream which has been sold down the river so many times…

They are left in an ocean of disappointment.

The latest escapees? Black conservatives, tired of holding that lantern out there on the lawn.

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Former "Black Republican", now Independent, Ken Barnes

Viewpoints: Racist cartoon of Obama forces me to leave GOP

I was one of those rare species: a black Republican, the guy willing to spit into the wind of conventional thought, who was often showcased on camera at party events to prove inclusiveness.

But as a proud black man, I can no longer be a member of the Republican Party.

Being a Republican has long been a part of my personal and professional identities, so leaving the party is a difficult and emotional decision.

In 1998, as a young man searching for what I believed were shared values, I cut ties with the Democratic Party and became a Republican. Democrats, in my view, had become unwelcoming to those holding center-right views not in lockstep with the party, and it was my belief that through hard work, the Republican Party could be utilized as a vehicle for improving our community.

For the next 13 years, I dedicated myself to growing the conservative base of the Republican Party, and in the process bound myself in emotion and deed.

During that time, I worked on behalf of Republican candidates at all levels, from presidential and gubernatorial campaigns, on down to local elections.

I have had the pleasure of serving as president of the Sacramento Republican Assembly, a term as a member of the California Republican Party executive committee, and most recently as treasurer of the Sacramento County Republican Party.

Last year alone, I donated more than 400 hours of my time to the Republican Party and made financial contributions to a number of Republican candidates.

As of late, however, when I look at myself in the mirror there is one question which perplexes me: Can I, in good conscience, remain affiliated with an organization whose message purveyors of racism and bigotry find attractive? Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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Black Republican Accuses Cong. Alcee Hastings of Sexual Harassment

I guess the only question I would have here is WTF would they have hired this woman in the first place? Alcee is certainly no saint – but there are some pretty big red flags on this woman. She appears to be associated with the scum side of the right wing, and is trying to promote her book. That isn’t to categorically say she is lying – but there seem to be a lot of motives…

Alcee Hastings, Fla. Democratic congressman, faces sexual harassment allegation

The conservative legal group Judicial Watch announced Monday that it has filed a lawsuit against Rep. Alcee Hastings, accusing the 10-term Florida Democrat of sexually harassing a policy adviser who worked on a commission that Hastings once chaired.

The lawsuit, filed Monday with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, accuses Hastings of making “unwelcome sexual advances” and taking retaliation against the female employee, Winsome Packer, from January 2008 to February 2010. Packer, a Republican, worked on the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, which Hastings had co-chaired until Democrats lost their House majority this year.

Also named as defendants in the lawsuit are the commission and its former staff director, Fred Turner.

According to the lawsuit, Hastings made repeated sexual advances toward Packer, including asking her to accompany him alone to his hotel room; asking her “humiliating and inappropriate” questions in public; and making unwanted physical contact, including “hugging her with both arms while pressing his body against her body and his face against her face.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 8, 2011 in Black Conservatives

 

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Black Tea Bagger at CPAC – “I get confused for a waiter a lot…”

Oh Yeah…It’s the bow tie…

It’s Hard Out There For A Black Candidate At CPAC

Texas Railroad Commissioner Williams. Looks a little bit like Louie Armstrong - but hardly the waiter.

Wandering around the vast and labyrinthine CPAC yesterday, I stumbled into Michael Williams, a Texas Railroad Commissioner (an important elected gig in the Lone Star State) and a Republican candidate for the Senate seat Kay Bailey Hutchison is retiring from.

Last year, I interviewed Williams — who at the time was among the lucky conservatives to have Sen. Jim DeMint’s (R-SC) endorsement in the Senate race that was supposed to happen when Hutchison quit after her run for governor (she didn’t, so Williams had to wait.) During our chat, he told me how conservatives need to do a better job reaching out to the African American community, where he acknowledged right wingers have little entre or experience.

When I ran into him yesterday, it appeared conservatives have not made much progress on that front. Ahead of me was a CPAC attendee rushing past, as they are wont to do in this giant place.

“Hey, are you Herman Cain?” the young man asked Williams, referring to another African American conservative running for federal officeand attending CPAC.

I asked Williams if that happened a lot.

“Not really,” he told me. “A lot of people think I’m a waiter.”

Williams blamed the confusion on his trademark bowtie, which — like a lot of conservatives — he wears all the time, and wears well.

A friend with him said that on more than one occasion, people had asked him to get them a drink.

“I think it’s really because of the bowtie,” Williams explained.

Confusion over who is and who isn’t a waiter is certainly not limited to CPAC, or to conservatives in general.

But Cain and Williams, along with Rep. Allen West (R-FL), who’ll be delivering the keynote address this afternoon, are pretty much the only black elected officials in attendance. It’s at least a little striking that people here get the men confused or think they work here.

Update: ABC News’ Michael Falcone tweeted today that West has also been confused for Herman Cain at CPAC.

All ya’ll look alike!

 

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Black Arizona Republican Forced to Resign After Tea Party Threats

Anthony Miller

Forer District Chairman Anthony Miller

The sole black Republican district chairman in Arizona resigned just hours after the assassination attempt on Gabrielle Giffords citing threats from Tea Party members and fear for his family’s safety.

Citing “constant verbal attacks” and other forms of intimidation District Chairman Anthony Miller resigned, along with several others active in the local party.

We have all been hearing about how the language of the Republicans and Tea Baggers isn’t really threatening…

That doesn’t hold much water when lifelong Republicans, afraid for their lives, are being blackmailed and threatened out of office.

Gabrielle Giffords’ Arizona shooting prompts resignations

Miller, a 43-year-old Ahwatukee Foothills resident and former campaign worker for U.S. Sen. John McCain, was re-elected to a second one-year term last month. He said constant verbal attacks after that election and Internet blog posts by some local members with Tea Party ties made him worry about his family’s safety.

In an e-mail sent a few hours after Saturday’s massacre in Tucson that killed six and injured 13, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, Miller told state Republican Party Chairman Randy Pullen he was quitting: “Today my wife of 20 yrs ask (sic) me do I think that my PCs (Precinct Committee members) will shoot at our home? So with this being said I am stepping down from LD20GOP Chairman…I will make a full statement on Monday.”

Pullen was in Washington, D.C. and not available for comment, an employee in his office said. State party spokesman Matt Roberts said he could not discuss details of the district’s disputes but, “Anthony has been a good Republican and was really involved in LD20.”

The newly-elected Dist. 20 Republican secretary, Sophia Johnson of Ahwatukee, first vice chairman Roger Dickinson of Tempe and Jeff Kolb, the former district spokesman from Ahwatukee, also quit. “This singular focus on ‘getting’ Anthony (Miller) was one of the main reasons I chose to resign,” Kolb said in an e-mail to another party activist. Kolb confirmed the contents of the e-mail to the Republic…

Miller said when he was a member of McCain’s campaign staff last year has been criticized by the more conservative party members who supported Republican opponent J.D. Hayworth. The first and only African-American to hold the party’s precinct chairmanship, Miller said he has been called “McCain’s boy,” and during the campaign saw a critic form his hand in the shape of a gun and point it at him.

“I wasn’t going to resign but decided to quit after what happened Saturday,” Miller said. “I love the Republican Party but I don’t want to take a bullet for anyone.”

 
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Posted by on January 12, 2011 in Black Conservatives, Domestic terrorism

 

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