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Roland Eviscerates Black Lawn Jockette

Damn! Bernadette Semple a former Democrat who caught the Trump disease, tries to defend the Chumph…It didn’t go well.

 

 

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Uncle Ben Carson – “Slaves Were Hardworking Immigrants”

Slaves were immigrants?

Lived the American Dream?

Not only the Chumph is Looney Tunes… Several of his appointees are too.

Dr Carson in a first, being the first brain surgeon ta actually remove his own brain.

Ben Carson tells HUD staff: Slaves are ‘immigrants’ who came here to ‘pursue prosperity and happiness’

Housing and Urban Housing Secretary Ben Carson on Monday said that African-Americans slaves were “immigrants” who came to the U.S. with dreams of building a better future for their children.

In his first address to HUD employees, Carson warned that there would be “no favorites for anybody, no extra” services for any one group.

“One of the things you will notice in this department under my leadership is that there will be a very big emphasis on fairness for everybody,” President Donald Trump’s HUD secretary said. “Everything that we do, every policy; no favorites for anybody, no extra for anybody, but complete fairness for everybody. Because that is what the founders of this nation had in mind, and if you read the constitution, it becomes very clear that that was the goal.”

At one point during the talk, Carson reflected on how America was a land of “dreams and opportunity.”

“There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships who worked even longer, even harder for less,” Carson noted. “But they too had a dream, that one day their sons, daughters, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters might pursue prosperity and happiness.”

 

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2017 in Black Conservatives

 

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Stacy Who? Gets Booted From Fox News

After dredging the sewers for Uncle Toms during the run up to the “election”, apparently Faux News has decided to do a Lawn Jockey reduction. First to be disappeared…Stacy Who? Dash. Employment opportunities are looking dimmer than midnight for the next 4 years.

Omarosa better look out too – because if she doesn’t get a job serving coffee in one of those short Maid’s outfits in the Whites Only House… She is next.

Image result for Stacey Dash Who?

Twitter lights up as Stacey Dash is cut from the Fox News lineup

Stacey Dash may continue speaking her mind on politics and the news of the day, but it won’t be for Fox News.

Fox News has decided not to renew Dash’s contract, The Hill reported on Saturday. The network, which recently announced the hire of former U.K. Independence Party head Nigel Farage (“Mr. Brexit,” to Donald Trump), also terminated the contracts of columnist George Will, who left the Republican Party in June, Republican strategist Ed Rollins, journalist Martin Kalb and columnist and radio commentator Cal Thomas.

Dash, the conservative-leaning actress and alumna of Paramus High School most widely known for her role in the 1995 film “Clueless” opposite Alicia Silverstone, joined Fox News as a contributor in 2014. During that time, Dash, who appeared on various Fox programs including “Outnumbered,” often drew the ire of social media. She was criticized for her controversial statements about the Oscars (she rejected a boycott of the ceremony due to lack of diversity in the nominees and later appeared in a Oscars bit as the new director of a minority outreach program, Black History Month (she doesn’t think it should exist) and BET (she doesn’t think it should exist, either).

In 2015, Fox suspended Dash after she used profanity in criticizing an address President Barack Obama delivered in the wake of the San Bernardino shooting. In 2016, Dash suggested that transgender people should go to the bathroom “in the bushes” rather than use bathrooms corresponding to their gender.

Dash’s memoir, “There Goes My Social Life: From Clueless to Conservative,” addressed the advent of her relationship with Fox, which arrived at a good time for her, after she endorsed Mitt Romney for president in 2012 with a highly scrutinized tweet. (Dash said she had voted for Obama in 2008.)

“On the day that I spent my very last dollar,” she wrote, “the Fox check came.”

 

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2017 in Black Conservatives

 

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Omarosa’s Delusion

Professional Lawn Jockey Omarosa Manigault’s latest delusional rant…

Trump aide claims ‘huge movement’ of black voters to GOP

Trump aide claims 'huge movement' of black voters to GOP

Different Tricks…Same old Pimp

Omarosa Manigault, an aide to President-elect Donald Trump, claimed Wednesday that there is a “huge movement” of African-Americans moving to the Republican Party.

Manigault, who worked for in the Bill Clinton White House for Vice President Al Gore and who voted for President Obama, said she used to be a Democrat.

“Traditionally, African-Americans have been Democrat, and I think the Democrats have taken advantage and taken for granted the African-American vote,” she said on Fox News Wednesday evening.
“You are seeing a huge movement of African-Americans moving to the Republican Party.”
Trump received 8 percent support among black voters, slightly outperforming the 6 percent support GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney received in 2012, according to New York Times exit polls.
But African-Americans overwhelmingly favored Clinton on Election Day — 88 percent voted for her.
In 2004, President George W. Bush received 11 percent support among black voters, while Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) received 4 percent support among African-Americans in 2008 when he faced Obama.
 
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Posted by on January 5, 2017 in Black Conservatives

 

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Black Conservative Sees the Light

Hummmmm. Even if late, sometimes the light comes on.

What does a black conservative do after a Trump win? Leave the GOP.

I thought there was going to be a revolution in the party. I was wrong.

When I arrived in Tampa for my first-ever Republican National Convention in 2012, I was enchanted. I met Jeb Bush and attended a panel on education and school choice. Kevin Johnson, the Democratic mayor of Sacramento, spoke alongside Bush, who talked about how his educational policies in Florida were focused on helping minorities find quality education, regardless of Zip code. There I was, listening to this bipartisan conversation focused on helping poor youths empower themselves and excel. There were no dog whistles and no racial innuendo, just good genuine policy focused on giving those in need a hand up. Exhilarating!

I was a proud African American who had voted for, donated to and supported Republicans in elections past, and now I was going to be part of a revolution in the GOP. The party of Lincoln finally reached out to people who looked like me.

It has never been easy being a black conservative. I was frustrated by how Democrats never seemed to have to earn African American votes but instead hid behind accusations of racism to hold the loyalty of people of color. And my views often made me feel ostracized. Like many African American conservatives, I sometimes approached social gatherings with other minorities with dread — I always tried to steer clear of politics, knowing that the conversation would veer to adulation for the first African American president and how I was “selling out.” But my first convention made me forget all of that for once.Image result for trump klan

The convention made me feel good about becoming more involved with the party, even though there was some ugliness simmering beneath the surface. An African American camerawoman was attacked with racial slurs, but I thought that was just an outlier. Later, I had to move on from Mitt Romney’s stereotype-laced postelection conference call, in which he said that minorities did not support him because they wanted gifts. The leadership of the party was slow to address racial strife in Ferguson, Mo.; West Baltimore, Hempstead, Tex.; Sanford, Fla., and many other places — even making excuses such as media overhype and race-baiting.

I wrote it off as the need for more diversity in the party. I even found myself defending voter suppression laws in states throughout the South since we needed to ensure “the integrity of the vote,” even if that meant doing it on the backs of those with fewer resources.

I mentally discarded other incidents until Donald Trump walked down that escalator and declared his candidacy for president. When he attacked Hispanics, it sent a chill down my spine. If he feels that way about them, how does he feel about me? I thought.

The intensity of my excitement in 2012 was replaced with a sobering disappointment for 2016. Trump’s desire to appeal to the so-called alt-right wing was troubling. His slowness to disavow the KKK was eye-popping. His insistence that more “law and order” is needed to address poor relationships between police and African American communities was sickening. His clumsy and ill-informed “outreach” to African Americans — which assumed we all lived in poverty, squalor and government dependence — was more insulting than uplifting. His decision to leverage African American apologists as surrogates such as Ben Carson and Mark Burns showed he was out of touch with the African American community and unwilling to change.

The 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland was a much different experience than Tampa. Against my better judgment, I attended, much less naive than four years before. The timing was critical — we were just a few weeks removed from the police killings in Dallas and the death of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge. The nation was stirred by the violence and unrest. Cooler heads needed to prevail. The first-day convention speakers did the opposite. Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke praised those who acquitted the officers in the Freddie Gray case and blasted the Black Lives Matter movement with very little compassion for the pain felt by so many when unarmed African Americans are killed by those in authority. Speakers after him followed suit.

Unlike 2012, this time I noticed I was a stark minority in a sea of white. I hadn’t been conscious of it before — it had not even mattered. All of the sudden, I felt like an outsider.Image result for trump klan

Part of my original attraction to the party was my conviction in my beliefs and how I thought those beliefs aligned with the party. I believe that society’s problems cannot be solved by simply growing government. I believe that government should be a steward of public money and resources, not wield them for personal political power. I believe that local government should be where the most power lies so citizens can more easily hold officials accountable. I believe that everyone should be able to worship the God they believe in, however they want to. I believe in the power of the free market. I do not believe in equal rewards, but I do believe in equal opportunity, regardless of Zip code. And my heart also bleeds when another unarmed African American is shot dead in the streets by police and politicians cover it up or leverage it for gain.

But today’s GOP, the party of Trump, of voter suppression and of religious and racial intolerance, does not represent those beliefs.

In my opinion, there are two types of African American Republicans. The first group is not sensitive to the distinct needs of the African American community or understands those needs but for selfish reasons puts them second to gain favor and not “rock the boat” within the party. The second group gets it and wants the party to change. They try tirelessly because they love this country, are devoted to what they believe in and want this party to be viable for African Americans.

For those in the first group I described, I hope for you that the Trump presidency delivers happiness. I have a hard time seeing how it could for the rest of us sensitive to our communities, but your priorities may lie elsewhere.Image result for trump klan

To those in the other group — the ones that get it — keep up the fight. You are better than me. I can no longer consider myself associated with this party that supported such a man and such an indifferent campaign.

I truly struggle to understand my place in this new Republican reality, where insensitivity and callousness replace the “better angels of our nature” (to quote the great Abraham Lincoln). And the reward for this approach? A wave that propelled Trump to the White House and Republican control of Congress.

Why bother? It is hard to see how my vision for the party could ever come to be if the opposite of that vision yields such fruit.

 

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Lawn Jockey of the Week Gets Slammed

Yet another Lawn Jockey “Minister” spewing the same old false trash and lies.

Cleveland’s Pastor James Davis and Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed go at it – in Reed’s case will real facts and real numbers…It ain’t pretty for the Uncle Tom.

Come on down “Pastor” Davis and get your Black Republican Lawn Jockey Supporter of the month award.

Black Conservative Jock Strap Award

 

 

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Roll the Lawn Jockey

Chumph Lawn Jockey Alert!

One of the standard techniques used by the race pimps like Hannity and O’Reilly on Faux News is to bring on one of their Lawn Jockeys to sing from the veranda, and to bring on a generally unknown black “liberal” to oppose them in a “debate”. Most of the time, it is a setup. The Liberal black person is chosen either because they are soft spoken, or at worst, someone who is unaware of the issues.That way it is easily to bloviate over the black liberal, or verbally intimidate them – which is a favorite tactic of O’Rielly.

Sometimes, soft spoken black liberal guest doesn’t follow the script – resulting in a very difficult time for the bought and paid for Uncle Tom.

Lesson…Don’t try and play Leo Terrell for a patsy.

Enjoy!

 

 

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