RSS

Tag Archives: abuse

Why Black Children Run Away From Home…

Yeah, a lot of black children run away from home or go missing. One of the reasons the Police and media don’t take it as seriously as they could is this…

Many of these children have reasons to run away.

Image result for black child spanked

We need to pay attention to the home lives that missing kids are fleeing from.

Last month, a rumor that more than 500 mostly black and Latino children from the District of Columbia had been abducted and sold into sex slavery went viral on social media. A new decision by D.C. police to alert the public whenever children were reported missing had backfired; most of the kids had been found safe within 24 hours, but those updates never spread as far as the initial reports. Worried people, from the Congressional Black Caucus to LL Cool J, raised alarms over what looked like a sudden epidemic that was being ignored in ways that would be unimaginable with white children.

Hoping to quell the outrage, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser assured the public that there has been no surge of missing kids. “But that doesn’t mean there aren’t children that need our help,” she said March 24 as she unveiled plans to create a task force to work with vulnerable teenagers.

Hundreds of children of color have been reported missing in D.C. at some point since January, but those numbers aren’t higher than usual. The police say 2,242 children were reported missing in 2016, down from 2,433 in 2015. Virtually all of them were found unharmed within 24 hours; in many cases the children, who showed no evidence of being exploited by sex traffickers, had repeatedly run away from home, according to a spokesman for the mayor.

Which means many children do indeed need our help — and we need to pay more attention to the home lives that they might be running away from.

Rates of reported child abuse are disproportionately high for black children. According to the Justice Department , black children ages 12 to 19 are “three times more likely to be victims of reported child abuse or neglect.” As many as 7,354 young people ages 12 to 24, most of them black, experience homelessness each year in D.C., and more than 2 million children nationwide do. In one national survey, nearly half reported intense conflict, neglect or physical harm by a family member as a major factor in their homelessness. Others experienced family instability due to unaffordable housing, or left the juvenile-justice system or the foster-care system without enough education or support to make it on their own. Research from the Administration for Children and Families shows that up to 42 percent of runaway and homeless youth are sexually abused before they leave their homes.

Black children are also disproportionately likely to suffer treatment at home that’s so bad that they want to flee. In 2015, black kids had the highest rate of abuse and neglect, at 14.5 per 1,000 children, compared with 8.1 per 1,000 for white children, according to the Children’s Bureau, part of the Department of Health and Human Services. More than 3,600 black children in the United States have died as a result of maltreatment in the past decade, a rate three times higher than for all other racial groups. Suicide rates among elementary-age black children have nearly doubled since the 1990s, while the rates for white children have fallen, according to a 2015 report from the Journal of the American Medical Association.

A disturbing number of children in D.C. and elsewhere are gambling that life on the street could not be worse than their abusive homes. I made the same choice in 1987 and in 1991 while growing up in Trenton, N.J.

I ran away from my adoptive family when I was 9 and again when I was 12. After the second time, I refused to go back, and I ended up yet another black child in New Jersey’s foster-care system. A warm bed and steady meals in my adoptive home were not worth constant “whuppings” and verbal abuse — which my adoptive parents and the wider black community said were love, discipline and protection from the police or white racists. I felt safer on my own, even if that meant living on the street. From age 12 to 14, I was shuttled between foster homes, youth shelters and group homes, until I was fortunate enough to win an academic scholarship to the Lawrenceville Prep School. So I understand where many of these kids are coming from.

My own experiences helped shape my role as an advocate for children, and it’s painful to see how common such abuse still is in my community. Without question, the toughest part of my work is convincing black people that a “no hitting” zone at home is crucial to helping children feel and be safe. Whupping kids is not “a black thing.” But parents argue that without whuppings, their children will end up in prison, even though we’ve been having national conversations about mass incarceration for decades. They cherry-pick Old Testament scriptures to justify hitting. They argue that there’s a difference between spanking and abuse, as if a child’s body experiences pain differently based on what parents call a swat or the intent behind it. And many people proclaim that they were whupped as children and “turned out fine,” even though they’ve grown up to see striking a child’s body as normal behavior. It’s a violent, unnecessary parenting practice planted in our culture through colonialism, slavery, forced indoctrination into Christianity and centuries of racial trauma.

If we are going to talk about missing children in D.C., we must look at beating kids as one of the root issues. Yes, sex trafficking does happen, and yes, the types of children who go missing in Washington and other cities — mostly black; mostly poor; disproportionately lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer — are more vulnerable than other kids. But neglect and abuse are among the most commonfactors.

So much of our national focus on black children is on how “bad” they are: how they need more physical punishment, zero tolerance at school, harsh sentences from the courts. They are blamed for their own deaths at the hands of adults who claimed they were afraid of them. That systemic devaluation of black children even extends into classrooms. In 19 states, students are still subject to corporal punishment; a disproportionately higher number of black children receive it. According to reports by the Education Department’s office of civil rights and Human Rights Watch, racial bias contributes to this problem, along with black parents signing opt-in forms empowering teachers and administrators to hit their children.

These messages have consequences. When black children are constantly told that they are a problem, that they are unworthy and undeserving of empathy and kindness, that they can be beaten in schools, in the streets, by cops and by the people who love them, running away from home doesn’t seem like such an extreme choice. If home so often isn’t a safe haven, should we be surprised?…Read the Rest Here

 

Advertisements
 
2 Comments

Posted by on April 9, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter, The New Jim Crow

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Military Did Not Appreciate the Chumph Using Military Widow as a Political Freak Show

 

One look at this picture tells you exactly how the Military felt how Military Leaders thought about the Chump psychologically raping a dead soldier’s widow for political points.

That freak-show turned my stomach last night. Especially because it was the Chumph’s attempt at gaining points for “fighting terrorist” which led to him ordering the ill conceived raid which resulted in deaths in the first place.

I am massively and utterly amazed the MSM commentators were stupid and venal enough to let him get away with that shit.

Ex-NSA analyst rips Trump for exploiting ‘trapped’ widow: ‘She didn’t want to stand up — we know why’

Former NSA analyst and columnist John Schindler reacted in horror on Tuesday after seeing Trump “exploit” Carryn Owens, the wife of slain Chief Petty Officer William (Ryan) Owens.

According to Schindler, the president crossed the line during his address to a joint session of Congress when he used Carryn Owens as a political prop.

Schindler immediately expressed his disgust on Twitter.

Snr Chief Owens’ widow…for God’s sake leave this poor woman alone.

Trump gloating, of course…talking the Bible.

Anybody who saw the faces of the Joint Chiefs tonight when the cam hit them knows exactly what the US military thinks of Trump.

Anybody who saw the faces of the Joint Chiefs tonight when the cam hit them knows exactly what the US military thinks of Trump.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Dayton Police Pepper Spray Black Man Already in Restraint Chiair

Talk about serial molesters! Police in Montgomery Country in Dayton, Ohio again Pepper Spray detainees who have been put into a restraint chairs and is helpless to defend themselves.

The man, Charles Wade had been arrested for being drunk

‘I can’t breathe!’: Video reveals Ohio cops pepper spraying man while he’s strapped in chair

New video has surfaced that shows police officers at the Montgomery County Jail in Dayton, Ohio pepper spraying a black suspect’s face despite the fact that they had already strapped him into a restraint chair.

The video, which was obtained and posted by the Washington Post, shows a man named Charles Wade being repeatedly hit with shots of pepper spray to the face while sitting in a restraining chair after his arrest for alleged drunk driving last October.

As he was being sprayed, Wade coughed and repeatedly told the officers that he was having trouble breathing as they told him to “stop resisting.”

“I can’t breathe, help me please!” he said repeatedly.

The Post notes that Wade this week filed a lawsuit against the Montgomery County sheriff’s department with the U.S. District Court in Ohio, in which he alleges the officers employed excessive force during their attempts to restrain him.

The Montgomery County Jail is the same jail that drew heavy criticism for similarly pepper spraying a white woman named Amber Swink, who was sprayed even after being restrained with a seven-point harness.

Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer at the time said that it was wrong to pepper spray Swink while she was restrained, but he called it an isolated incident. Wade’s attorney, Douglas Brannon, tells the Post that this new footage shows such incidents are much more common than what the department has let on.

“I think it happened again because there was no discipline handed out to officers involved in abusing Amber Swink,” he said. “I think this type of treatment is becoming something that happens with impunity within the Montgomery County jail.”

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 16, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

In DC, Broken Trust in Police

Maybe some of the cities wouldn’t be so broke…If they introduced some rationality to their Police forces.

‘It made me hate the police’: Ugly encounters with officers fuel loss of trust, costly payouts

The sound of a battering ram against wood would have been jarring enough, but Viola Briggs had a metal front door.

The only warning that it was about to come crashing open was a knock and a three-word shout: “Police! Open up!”

The 55-year-old legal assistant had just finished watching an episode of “CSI: Miami” on her computer. She would have opened the door but didn’t have time to take a step. She shouted for her older brother, who lived with her in their Southwest Washington apartment. Then, suddenly, the door frame gave way and 13 police officers rushed in, weapons drawn.

Over the past two years, one graphic video after another has captured ugly and sometimes deadly interactions between police officers and black residents of the communities they serve. From one city to the next, the shaky-framed images have fueled demonstrations and made household names of the dead: Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Walter Scott, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile.

But for Briggs, and many people like her across the country, their trust in the police was eroded long before videos of police shootings were going viral on Facebook and Twitter. It was destroyed in moments that were not caught on camera and that might have gone unnoticed if they hadn’t been reported.

An extensive examination of citizen complaints and civil lawsuits filed against D.C. police over the past decade shows that even in a city with a majority-black department and a robust civilian oversight office with newly enhanced powers, hundreds of incidents occur each year in which people feel mistreated by those who are supposed to protect them.

In one case, a 65-year old African American man said he was leaving a library in Southeast Washington when he was detained and handcuffed, even though he did not fit the description of the threatening library patron police had been called about. In another, an officer admitted to spreading a black man’s buttocks twice in an unlawful body-cavity search but denied that he “jammed” a finger inside him, as the man claimed.

Since 2005, the city has agreed or been ordered to pay at least $31.6 million in 173 cases alleging police misconduct, including claims of false arrest and excessive use of force, according to a Washington Post analysis of data obtained from the D.C. attorney general’s office.

Complaints against police — and the settlements that sometimes result — are common across the country. Baltimore, which has a similar-size police force, paid $5.7 million in 102 court judgments and settlements for alleged misconduct between 2011 and September 2014, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of city and court records. During roughly that same period, alleged police misconduct cost the District $2.9 million in 38 cases.

But since then, the District’s payouts have risen sharply. In the first nine months of 2016, misconduct lawsuits cost city taxpayers at least $3.8 million in judgments or settlements. And last week, the family of Terrence Sterling, a motorcyclist fatally shot Sept. 11 by a D.C. police officer, filed a $50 million lawsuitagainst the city and the police department alleging that the 31-year-old “was unarmed and posed no danger” when he was killed.

Some of the District’s lawsuits detail beatings that resulted in hospital stays. Others tell of people who had committed no crimes before contentious encounters with police landed them in jail.

Viola Briggs and her brother, Frank Briggs, were the recipients of a settlement this year.

The two had moved into their apartment three months before the night of Jan. 20, 2012, when the officers, several wearing ski masks, held them at gunpoint.

Police had a search warrant for drugs but did not find any, according to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the siblings. The case, launched against the city and the 13 officers involved, argued that the warrant was based on a conversation with a confidential informant and that investigators did not attempt to corroborate the information or research who lived at the residence.

Once inside, the officers ordered the siblings to lie on the floor. Viola Briggs did. But as her brother, then 56 and suffering from back pain so debilitating that he qualified for disability, slowly lowered himself, an officer shoved him to the ground, according to the suit.

Before that day, Viola Briggs said, she held a deep respect for law enforcement. One of her three sons is an Army captain who has considered joining a civilian police force, she said. She regularly donated to the Fraternal Order of Police. And, after two U.S. Capitol Police officers were killed in the line of duty, she wrote this on a Washington Post online memorial site: “I would like to express my sincere condolences to the family of the two brave officers who gave their lives for the protection of others. May GOD be with you in your time of need and may HE also bring you peace.”

After the raid on her apartment, she said, she was left not only with a broken door but also with a shattered sense of security. For years, she slept with a baseball bat at her side and a chair shoved against the door.

“It made me hate the police,” Briggs said. “Not all of the police. It made me hate the police at the 7th District because of what they did to me.”…More here

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 27, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Eastpointe Michigan Cops Beat Restrained Black Man – Lawsuit

This is a bit hard to watch as 5 white cops jump and beat a black man…

Michigan cops strap black man to a chair and beat him until he is blind in one eye

 

A black resident of Eastpointe, Michigan has filed suit against local police after they tied him to a chair and beat him so severely that he permanently lost the vision in one eye.

Detroit’s Fox 2 News said that Frankie Taylor was arrested for driving under the influence on Aug. 10, 2015, but what happened when he arrived at the station was like something from a nightmare — and cameras caught it all.

“If you keep acting like a child, you’re going to get strapped in that chair and you’re going to stay there,” an officer can be heard on tape telling Taylor.

The station’s surveillance cameras caught officers carrying Taylor to a chair and restraining him, then threatening to tase him. Another officer entered the frame, donned a pair of gloves and began to beat Taylor savagely until he lost consciousness.

“Stop resisting,” the officer robotically repeated between blows to Taylor’s face and head. “Stop resisting. Stop resisting.”

Taylor’s screams of pain and terror can be clearly heard on the tape’s audio.

“The guy hit me so many times, it made me cry once I seen the tape,” said Taylor to Fox 2. “I was knocked out.”

Taylor’s attorney James Rasor said that rather than seeking medical treatment for Taylor’s injuries, they transferred him to Macomb County Jail the next day.

Within days he was admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for surgery, but it was too late to save his eye.

“He has permanent loss of eyesight in one eye. His vision is severely compromised,” said Rasor. “He has these horrible nightmares.”

Rasor said that unlike white arrestees, Taylor was not allowed to make a phone call.

“You want to protect people from this type of brutality by police forces,” said Rasor. “White folks were allowed to use the phone by police officers; even one who had urinated in his pants was allowed to use the phone. Frankie Taylor wasn’t, and the only difference is that Frankie Taylor happens to be African-American.”

“I don’t feel like that I was a threat to the officers to the point that they had to hit me until I was unconscious,” Taylor said. “I wouldn’t expect this from officers.”

 
1 Comment

Posted by on December 7, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Black Woman – White Boyfriend Trump Supporter

Is this woman really that hard up for a man?

Black woman calmly endures her boyfriend’s disturbing racist rant

A black Rhode Island woman endured an abusive, racist rant by her white boyfriend during a fight. In a recording, her then-boyfriend, who appears to be a fan of Donald Trump, berates her about the Black Lives Matter movement, complete with multiple n-words and a policy suggestion for Donald Trump.

“You know what? The second he’s elected, that’s what Trump should do,” he says. “Give all you mother fuckers your tickets back. You don’t like it? Peace!”

“Black lives matter, go matter in fucking Ghana” he continues.

Somehow achieving the superhuman feat of maintaining her composure, she asks, “You do realize you sound like a racist, right?”

“I don’t care. You wanna know why? Cause I’m not up there saying white lives matter, white lives come to the front, black lives go to the back, I’m just like, “Hey, what’s up? How you doing?”

He then proceeds to pantomime how he imagines BLM protestors talk, and concludes with, “Fuck your black ass, get the fuck out.”

“Get out of my country, you’re causing the fucking problem. Bye!” he says.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on November 15, 2016 in The Definition of Racism, The Post-Racial Life, Women

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Stop and Frisk Scam on Amtrak

One of the things which I believe should be on everyone’s “Bucket List”, if you can beg, borrow, or steal a way to pay for it is to take one of the few remaining Great Train trips in the US. If you are willing to go to Canada, there are still a number of unbelievable Trans-Canada, Rockies, and Northern excursions.

The last of the great trains in the US is the California Zephyr linking the Windy City and the west coast, the daily two-night California Zephyr is Amtrak’s longest route at 2,438 miles. It cuts right across the center of the US, traversing cornfields, cattle country and the Great Plains before climbing great S- and U-shaped curves to reach the Continental Divide inside the six-mile-long Moffat Tunnel at 9,239 feet above sea level and the highest point reached by an Amtrak train.

You cross the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, follow the Colorado River for more than 200 miles, cross the Oregon Trail, touch the old Rock Island Line immortalized by Lead Belly and Johnny Cash and pass the wooden covered bridges featured in the film The Bridges of Madison County.

As a train buff, I have done the Zephyr , the Sky Chief (LA to Chicago), The Crescent (NYC to New Orleans), The Great Northern, and the Empire Builder (Chicago to Seattle). Fun…fun…fun!

Apparently the local Police (at least on the Zephyr) have taken to harassing the passengers and absconding with their money.

Image result for california zephyr in rockies

The Dangers of Going West on Amtrak

Another traveler reports being harassed by police officers on the California Zephyr.

Due to high costs and low ridership, Amtrak loses money on the California Zephyr, the passenger train that traverses a picturesque route from Chicago to the Bay Area. Its balance sheet would improve if more people could be persuaded to buy tickets for a “Superliner Roomette,” where there’s a picture window to watch passing scenery, two fold-down beds, and private space to get a good night’s sleep.

But the few passengers who forgo a faster, cheaper flight, shelling out upwards of $800 in hopes of an unusually pleasant journey, are setting themselves up for unpleasantness: On the route, law-enforcement officers are prone to treating passengers who’ve done nothing wrong as suspects in the drug-trafficking business.

This harassment has been going on for years.

In previous articles, I’ve written about Joseph Rivers, a 22-year-old who boarded an Amtrak train with his life savings, only to have it seized by DEA agents with no evidence of any lawbreaking, forcing him to hire a lawyer to get back what was rightfully his. I’ve written about mathematician Aaron Heuser, who traveled aboard Amtrak around the time he left his job at the National Institutes of Health—near Reno, law-enforcement officers violated his rights and took money from his wallet. I’ve noted the ACLU’s work to document behaviors deemed “suspicious” on Amtrak trains:

Among them:

Unusual nervousness of traveler
Unusual calmness or straight ahead stare
Looking around while making telephone call(s)
Position among passengers disembarking (ahead of, or lagging behind passengers)
Carrying little or no luggage
Purchase of tickets in cash

Purchase tickets immediately prior to boarding
After publishing those stories, I received correspondence from other innocent people allegedly harassed by law enforcement on Amtrak trains, many on travel to California. And I’m sorry to report that despite my efforts to shed light on these abuses, and similar articles in other publications, I still receive new emails with the same old story.

The latest comes from Evan Rinehart, an engineer who lives in New Orleans, Louisiana. He recently took an Amtrak to Chicago without incident, save for chilly temperatures and a passenger seated beside him in coach whom he found unpleasant.

He decided to buy a private compartment for the rest of his journey west.

On the last morning of his trip, he wrote, he was prematurely awoken from the good night’s sleep he purchased at a premium. A plain-clothes police officer was knocking at his door.

“He asked if I was transporting large amounts of drugs, large quantities of currency, or illegal weapons. Obviously I said no, which was true,” he wrote. “Then he asked me about the purpose of my trip and how long I would be in San Francisco. I didn’t have much of a plan, but I told him I was visiting friends there, which was true. Then he wanted to search my luggage, all two small bags in the roomette, ‘with your permission of course, with you present.’ I knew that there needed to be a warrant to justify such an unreasonable search, but being intimidated as all hell I let him. When I backed into the hallway he introduced me to his partner who was standing some distance away who just stared at me the whole time.”
All this when at most the search would uncover an amount of drugs so tiny it could fit in two small travel bags. How would that change the drug scene in the Bay Area?

Most law-enforcement officials would consider this a non-incident: cops got consent for a search and found nothing at no cost beyond their time. In reality, these sorts of “nothing to see here” interactions unnerve people, spoil their journeys, and cause them to feel that they’ve been mistreated by their own government. The experience is only more galling when the public employees conducting the search adopt a hostile attitude, treating innocents like they are lying criminals.

The person who searched Rinehart’s bag started to engage him about what he had packed. “At one point he remarked that I didn’t have enough clothes with me for the length of my vacation, however long he thought that was,” the passenger recalled. “This remark pissed me off, but at the time I continued treating these guys like normal people hoping they would leave. As the train was getting ready to leave he abruptly ended the conversation, thanked me for being patient and they left.” Rinehart has been seeking a refund from Amtrak without success, complaining that his treatment aboard the train was “less than first class,” though he paid $917.

More troubling was what happened when he tried to file a complaint about the interaction with law enforcement. “Thinking these police may not have been real, I called Amtrak police to report suspicious circumstances,” he wrote. “Without confirmation that this was standard procedure, the operator suggested that I definitely should call Reno police to get the specific unit and reasons for being selected. So I called Reno police and the woman I talked to was quite unprofessional, also didn’t confirm that it was standard procedure, or seem to be concerned that I thought it might be fake police. Then she suggested I call internal affairs.”…More Here

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: