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Monthly Archives: April 2017

73% Don’t Trust Republican Congress To Do a Honest Investigation of Russia-Trump

Liars, traitors,  and scumbags like Nunes and Chaffetz have eliminated any trust in Republicans putting Patriotism over Party…

Poll: 73% Back Independent Probe of Russian Election Interference

Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they want an independent, non-partisan commission instead of Congress to investigate Russia’s involvement in the 2016 election, according to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

Seventy-three percent of respondents prefer the independent investigation, versus 16 percent who pick Congress.

Still, a majority of Americans — 54 percent — believe that Congress should investigate whether there was contact between the Russian government and the Trump campaign, which is essentially unchanged from February’s NBC/WSJ poll.

That includes 84 percent of Democrats and 51 percent of independents who want to see this congressional investigation, but just 21 percent of Republican respondents who want it.

Yet a combined 61 percent of Americans say they have little to no confidence in Congress conducting a fair and impartial investigation into Russia’s involvement in the 2016 election.

Only a combined 39 percent say they have “some” or a “great deal” of confidence in Congress conducting a fair and impartial investigation.

These numbers come as committees in both the House and Senate are looking into Russia’s involvement in the 2016 election. But the House investigation erupted in controversy after House Intelligence Committee Devin Nunes, R-Calif., suggested that Trump and his associates may have been monitored by U.S. intelligence officials during the transition.

Nunes stepped aside from the investigation earlier this month.

 

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What the Stylish Are Wearing – ITMFA

Yeah… Get Yours – Here.

ITMFA Lapel PinsITMFA Shirt (Black)

Oh…the ITMFA stands for Impeach the Motherf***er Already!

 

Dan Savage Raises $100K With ‘Impeach The Mother F*cker Already’ Swag

And he isn’t planning to stop there.

Dan Savage is using his disdain for President Donald Trump for great causes.

The LGBTQ rights activist and author announced April 18 that he’d raised $100,000 for three organizations that are in direct opposition to Trump policies through the sale of ITMFA, or “Impeach The Mother F*cker Already,” merchandise.

Savage, 52, made the announcement on the weekly Seattle newspaper, The Stranger, and on his personal Instagram.

Accoding to Savage’s Instagram site –

dansavageI’m mailing out checks today—and not just to the IRS.

This morning I had the distinct pleasure of mailing off checks to Planned Parenthood ($33,333.34), the ACLU ($33,333.33) and the International Refugee Assistance Project ($33,333.33)—money we raised selling ITMFA (“Impeach The Mother Fucker Already”) buttons, t-shirts, hats, stickers, coffee cups, and lapel pins at http://www.ITMFA.org and http://www.impeachthemotherfuckeralready.com. And I got to mail those checks out because nearly 10,000 Savage Love readers and Savage Lovecast listeners have ordered #ITMFA gear over the last eight weeks!

The best part of wearing ITMFA buttons or t-shirts or hats or lapel pins or all of the above? Or the second best part, I should say, after helping to raise money for three critically important and hugely effective organizations fighting Donald Trump? The interactions you have with friends, co-workers, neighbors, at anti-Trump marches, on the bus, etc. Because when people are going to ask you what ITMFA stands for and YOU GET TO TELL THEM it stands for ‘Impeach The Mother Fucker Already!” (If there are kids around you can go with “Malicious Fascist” or “Malodorous Fart” or “Malignant Fraud.”) We sell the buttons in ten packs (ten for $10) so you can share buttons with people who absolutely have to have one after they find out what it means!

 

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in Second American Revolution

 

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On Teaching Racism

Not sure why the cashier in this story thought it her duty to indoctrinate the child in her own racism…

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Girl, 2, defends choice of doll to cashier: “She’s a doctor like I’m a doctor”

Two-year-old Sophia was told she could pick out a “special prize” — anything she wants — after she successfully completed potty training.

She was thrilled, and of course, headed straight for the doll aisle when she walked into Target with her mom, Brandi Benner, on Friday afternoon. Scanning the aisles, Sophia passed a row of baby dolls and headed for the “big girl dolls.” One doll in particular caught her eye: a little black girl dressed in a white lab coat, wearing a stethoscope around her neck.

“When she picked [the doll] up and saw that she was a doctor it was game over,” Benner told CBS News. “She got so excited.”

“Mommy! Mommy! Mommy! I want this one. I want this one,” she shouted.

Smiling, Benner picked up the doll, “Oh, absolutely.”

She still had some money left over, so she picked out a Jeep for her new doll to ride around in. Together, Sophia and her mother walked to the cash register to check out. As always, Sophia offered to “pay” for the items — and by pay, she means put the toys on the conveyer belt.

She was greeted by the cashier, who asked, “Are you going to a birthday party?”

Confused, Sophia ignored the question and continued to stare at her beloved prize.

Then the cashier pointed to the doll, whose name is Megan, and asked if she picked her out for a friend.

Benner spoke up, explaining to the cashier that Sophia was getting a reward for using the potty.

“I am not ashamed that’s how I did it, because it works,” joked Benner about using the doll as incentive for potty training.

The woman gave Benner a puzzled look and turned to Sophia and asked, “Are you sure this is the doll you want, honey?”

At that point, Benner recalls she was starting to feel protective of Sophia, hoping she wouldn’t understand why the woman was questioning her choice of doll. But just as she was about to speak up, Sophia interjected, “Yes, please!”

The cashier replied, “But she doesn’t look like you. We have lots of other dolls that look more like you.”

Sophia responded, “Yes, she does. She’s a doctor like I’m a doctor. And I’m a pretty girl and she’s a pretty girl. See her pretty hair? And see her stethoscope?” her mother said.

The cashier simply responded with an “Oh, that’s nice.” She finished ringing up the family and they were on her way. Sophia didn’t think twice about the exchange, unlike Benner.

The mother of two — Sophia, 2, and Isabelle, 7 months — wanted to share the story with her Facebook friends.

“This experience just confirmed my belief that we aren’t born with the idea that color matters. Skin comes in different colors just like hair and eyes and every shade is beautiful,” Benner wrote in a post that has since gone viral with more than 201,000 shares.

While Benner is happy people are spreading the message, she feels it’s sad that it had to be said in the first place.

“It’s sad that such a small act has become national news,” she said. “In a sense it shouldn’t be surprising that a kid of one color wanted a doll of another — that shouldn’t be such a huge thing.”

Fortunately, her daughter wasn’t fased by it.

“What if she had been older — like 7, 8 or 9?” Benner asked. “Then she would have experienced more of the world and been more aware of cultural ‘dos and don’ts,’ and maybe would have second guessed [herself]. She maybe wouldn’t have been so quick to stick up for herself.”

Benner just hopes her daughter keeps her spunky spirit, and her dream to become a doctor.

Sophia first learned the word “stethoscope” from the TV cartoon “Doc McStuffins.” And her pediatrician allows the little girl to play with the tools in her doctor bag, which led to her desire to work in medicine someday.

That’s why, to Sophia, the doll’s skin tone doesn’t matter — all that matters is that she helps people, just like Sophia wants to do.

 

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Trash Can of History – NOLA Finally Begins Removal of Confederate Statues

A bit of “History” which should have been removed a long time ago – These statues are nothing more than the symbols which divide America.

Putting these “memorials” up is no different than putting up a statue of Hitler in front of a synagogue.

The protesters were carrying candles? Surprised they weren’t burning crosses.

New Orleans Begins Removing Statues Commemorating the Confederacy

New Orleans on Monday began removing four statues dedicated to the era of the Confederacy, capping a prolonged battle about the future of the memorials, which critics deemed symbols of racism and intolerance and which supporters viewed as historically important.

Workers dismantled an obelisk, which was dedicated to the Battle of Liberty Place and was erected to honor members of the “Crescent City White League” who in 1874 fought against the racially integrated New Orleans police and state militia, Mayor Mitch Landrieu said in a statement.

The workers were dressed in flak jackets, helmets and scarves to conceal their identities because of concerns about their safety, The Associated Press reported.

Pieces of the monument were put on a truck and hauled away.

Other monuments expected to be removed include a bronze statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in a traffic circle, named Lee Circle, in the city’s central business district since 1884; an equestrian statue of P.G.T. Beauregard, a Confederate general, and one of Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy.

Citing security risks and threats to contractors seeking to do the work, the city would not reveal details about the removal of the other statues.

The monuments were erected decades after the Civil War ended by people who wanted to demonstrate that the South should feel no guilt in having fought the Civil War, the mayor’s statement said.

“The removal of these statues sends a clear and unequivocal message to the people of New Orleans and the nation: New Orleans celebrates our diversity, inclusion and tolerance,” Mr. Landrieu said. “This is not about politics, blame or retaliation. This is not a naïve quest to solve all our problems at once. This is about showing the whole world that we as a city and as a people are able to acknowledge, understand, reconcile — and most importantly — choose a better future.”

The debate over Confederate symbols has taken center stage since nine people were killed at a black church in South Carolina in June 2015. South Carolina removed the Confederate battle flag, which flew at its State House for more than 50 years, and other Southern cities have considered taking down monuments.

After moving the statues into storage, New Orleans will seek a museum or other site to house them. The city said it gained private funding to relocate the statues, though it did not say how much money it secured or identify its source.

The opposition to the monuments’ removal — expressed in op-ed articles, social media posts and shouting at public meetings — was vigorous. A group opposing their removal said it had collected 31,000 signatures for a petition.

Demonstrators gathered for a candlelight vigil on Monday as workers removed the Liberty Place monument.

Robert Bonner, 63, who said he was a Civil War re-enactor, protested the monument’s removal. “I think it’s a terrible thing,” he told The A.P. “When you start removing the history of the city, you start losing money. You start losing where you came from and where you’ve been.”

The removal happened on Confederate Memorial Day, which is formally observed by Alabama and Mississippi to commemorate those who died in the Civil War.

An organization dedicated to preserving monuments in New Orleans, the Monumental Task Committee, opposed removing the statues.

In a statement on Monday, Pierre McGraw, the group’s president, said the removal process had been “flawed since the beginning” and that the use of unidentified money reeks of “atrocious government.”

“People across Louisiana should be concerned over what will disappear next,” the statement added.

In December 2015, the City Council voted 6-1 to take the statues down. In January 2016, a federal judge dismissed an attempt by preservation groups and a chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to stop their removal.

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter, The Post-Racial Life

 

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Color Lines – Appearances Can Be Decieving

Race in America is a amorphous thing. Most likely what “classification” you fall into will be based on your looks.

I have a family relationship with the Shinnecock Tribe, and from the pic below, knew this author’s mother, and possibly her father. The Reservation is pretty small, and all of the teens often gathered together at the beach. There was a NYC connection as well. I am not Native American (Not one drop according to my DNA test), however one of my Uncles married a Native American and lived on the reservation. I spent a number of summers both working and visiting the Reservation and am an Honorary Member of the Tribe. Which doesn’t mean anything in terms of identity, but does mean because of my Uncle’s marriage I have a few cousins there.

My family has everything from blonde haired, blue eyed to deepest ebon. The first of which caused a lot of problems back in the day. As a teen, I struggled with the existence of both black and “white” relatives. To understand that, you have to understand the historical context of the 60′ black “awakening”.

I don’t share Ms Joseph’s thoughts about Donezal. The only thing I see there is a tragedy.

Stealth sisterhood: I look white, but I'm also black. And I don't hate Rachel Dolezal

Stealth sisterhood: I look white, but I’m also black. And I don’t hate Rachel Dolezal

I am white, I am black, I am Native American. And I know what it’s like for people not to see all of who I am

On a hot, humid New York City morning in 1980, I stood with my mother in the checkout line of an A&P supermarket near our home. As she pushed our groceries along the cashier’s belt with me trailing behind, mom realized she had forgotten her wallet at home, but she had her checkbook. Leaving me standing alone in the line for a moment while she saw the manager to have her check approved, the clerk refused to bag our groceries and hand them to me. She was black, and I was white. “These groceries belong to that woman over there,” the woman nodded towards my mother. “They ain’t yours.” Confused, I said, “But that’s my mother. I’ll take them for her.” She looked me up and down. “No,” she said, her voice cold.

The clerk refused to believe that indeed I belonged to, and came from, my black mother, until mom returned to find me choking back tears. She gave the clerk a tongue lashing, which was not her style, and we left the market.  Later, mixed Native American and black children threw stones at me near my home on the Shinnecock Indian Reservation as I rode my bike. They yelled, “Get off our land, white girl!” These painful and strange experiences gave me my first taste of racial prejudice, and they have stayed with me all these years.

I am a child of many nations. I am white, I am black, I am Native American. I am West Indian, German, Irish. Brown and light together — integrated, not inter-racial, because race means nothing when you come from everywhere.

This Sunday’s New York Times Race-Related section ran a fascinating piece on DNA and racial identity by West Chester University professor Anita Foeman. For the past decade, she has asked hundreds of people to take part in ancestry DNA tests, and to date, over 2,000 have participated. “But first,” she wrote, “I ask people how they identify themselves racially. It has been very interesting to explore their feelings about the differences between how they define themselves and what their DNA makeup shows when the test results come in.”

Those results are often startling to the subjects and rife with racial stereotypes, Foeman found. According to her studies, some who came up with surprise Asian heritage in spite of looking white or brown noted, “That’s why my son is good at math!” Others who explored African heritage responded, “I thought my biological father might be black; I heard he liked basketball.”  Many of us harbor deeply-rooted prejudices that we aren’t even aware of, until it matters to us.

I don’t remember what mom said that day in the supermarket, but I can tell you that while she had been the object of many, many racist remarks and challenging situations in her life, she was not entirely prepared for what happened that day. That’s not to say she didn’t talk about the reality of how our family was different from others. To try to address the dearth of literary references to kids who looked like me, my mother physically altered my childhood books, using markers to make one parent brown and other other white, while the child originally drawn remained white-appearing, like me. But the scene in the supermarket still took her by surprise.

Confrontations over race can still catch Americans unprepared, such as when Rachel Dolezal, the now-former head of the Spokane, Washington chapter of the NAACP, appeared on the media radar. Dolezal, who stopped by Salon recently to talk with me on her book tour, was born white but identifies as black and calls herself “transracial.”

Dolezal was “outed” two years ago by her biological parents for not being black as she had claimed, and subsequently resigned from the NAACP. She became a polarizing figure under heavy media scrutiny as she appeared to dodge questions about her unconventional chosen identity. She has been unable to continue to work as a university instructor of African and African American art history, and to this day is despised by many observers, black and white, for posing as a black person.

My Salon colleague D. Watkins, an African American writer from Baltimore, wondered why Dolezal couldn’t just “use her whiteness to advocate for black people,” rather than making up and living in her own fantasy world where race and ethnicity no longer cause any social or political delineations. He is one of many to hold this opinion, and it’s one I agree with.

Rebecca Carroll wrote for Dame in 2015 about what she calls Dolezal’s “apocalyptic, White privilege on steroids” with a palpable anger shared by many people of color. When I talked to my childhood writing mentor Barbara Campbell, a former New York Times reporter who is African American and has two multiracial sons, she wondered about Dolezal with a mix of anger and genuine confusion. “What is wrong with that woman? I feel empathy for her, because she is clearly delusional, but she can step out into the world as a white woman any time she wants to stop being ‘black.’ Black women don’t have that luxury.”

Campbell explained that growing up in St. Louis, she had many light-skinned relatives who resembled Dolezal and could “pass” for white, but otherwise lived their lives as people of color. “They would go to ‘work white,’ because they could earn more money and get better-paying jobs, but then they would go home and be black.”

But this Dolezal thing — this is a horse of another color entirely. Why, wondered many, would someone white want to live within the very real challenges of being black in America, when she had a choice? Dolezal’s explanation? She doesn’t define herself by race, just a feeling of affinity with the black culture she’s always had.

As one might expect, the last few years have been tough since her exposure, she told me, noting her newly adopted legal name, Nkechi Amare Diallo, which she claimed was a “gift” to her by a Nigerian man. When she arrived at our offices, it was hard to know what to think, or believe. Frankly, it was hard to feel any animosity at all, despite the vitriolic sentiments many of my dark and light-skinned family, friends and colleagues had for Dolezal. She arrived carrying her beautiful, light brown baby son, Langston Hughes (Yes. Stop. That’s his name. What can you do?), who was cared for by her adopted black sister, Esther. Dolezal appeared like any other tired, working mom. I offered her coffee, and empathy, rather than taking an adversarial approach.

I did suggest, however, that some of the passages in her new book, “In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World,” were outrageous and possibly specious. Dolezal shrugged. “I don’t expect everyone to agree with or believe me,” she said. Among her claims: she grew up living in a tee pee in Montana (my Native American percentage shudders). She was beaten by her parents and forced to weave and wear a coat loomed from dog hair. She identified with people of color from an early age, after reading her grandmother’s National Geographic magazines, and spread mud on her face to try to feel what it was like to have brown skin. Dolezal has said some very polemical things, some — dare I say — dumb things, that do not make her a sympathetic figure. Comparing her white Montana childhood to what chattel slaves experienced, even if indeed she was miserable, is a stretch by any measure, and engendered rightful animus from real black folks…Read the Rest Here

 

 
 

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Roger Ailes, Bill O’Reilly…Sean Hannity? Fox News a Nest for Sexual Predators

Batter up! Next on the seemingly never ending list of Fox News talking heads hit with sexual harassment charges – Sean Hannity.

Now – than than fitting the pattern of actions of others at the toxic environment crated by Ailes at Fox, the racist POS Hannity may, or may not be guilty at this point.

However, the established confluence between conservatism, racism and sexual predation…Doesn’t look good.

Claiming the CIA or NSA is after his ass, and that he is wiretapped by the Government rather destroys the credibility of his plea of innocence.

Image result for Sean Hannity Jesse Peterson

Sean Hannity and his favorite Lawn Jockey prop, Jesse Lee Peterson

Sean Hannity Accused Of Sexual Harassment

The Fox News host categorically denies the claim.

Sean Hannity is the latest Fox News star to be accused of sexual harassment.

In an interview with the Pat Campbell Show on Friday, former Fox News contributor Debbie Schlussel claimed that Hannity had invited her to his hotel room — twice — when they appeared together for one of his programs. But when she rebuffed him, Schlussel said that she was never asked back on the show.

Schlussel claimed the “awkward” incident began when Hannity invited her to a store where he was signing books. While there, she said Hannity asked her: “Why don’t you come back with me to my hotel?” Schlussel said she responded: “No, I have to get ready for the show.”

Schlussel said Hannity pressed her again to come to his hotel room after the show taping, which did not go well. She refused.

“I wasn’t booked on his show again, and he called me and yelled at me,” Schlussel said. “It was made clear to me that I didn’t go back to his hotel with him after. I got a very weird feeling about the whole thing, and I kind of knew I wouldn’t be back on his show.”

She added: “This kind of stuff is all over the place at Fox News and anything that has to do with Sean Hannity.”

Her comments were aired just days after Bill O’Reilly’s ouster by Fox News in the wake of revelations that he and the company had paid out some $13 million to women who accused him of sexual harassment.

Fox News provided a statement to The Huffington Post from Hannity, who said that Schlussel’s claims were “100 percent false and a complete fabrication.” He called her a “serial harasser who has been lying about me for well over a decade,” and threatened to sue her using a “team of some of the finest and toughest lawyers in the country.”

Hannity also characterized Schlussel’s comments as part of a “coordinated effort afoot to now silence those with conservative views.”

Schlussel, however, is a conservative herself. One sign of her politics was her repeated — and false — claim beginning in 2006 that President Barack Obama was a Muslim, insisting: “Once a Muslim, always a Muslim.”

But Schlussel has also clashed with Hannity, whom she referred to as “Vannity.” In 2007, she accused him of plagiarizing one of her columns. Three years later, she said the Freedom Alliance, a charity linked to Hannity, was involved in questionable practices, which the charity vehemently denied.

“This is not the first time Debbie Schlussel has lied about Sean Hannity,” Fox News stated. A point-by-point refutation of Schlussel’s attacks on the charity was also included.

Fox’s track record on sexual harassment, on the other hand, is abysmal. Before the most recent controversy over O’Reilly, several women had accused former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes of sexual harassment, which ultimately resulted in millions of dollars in payoffs. Former Fox News host Alisyn Camerota just revealed on Sunday that Ailes made inappropriate sexual comments to her and told her she’d have to meet him in a hotel if she wanted more opportunities at the network.

Ailes was eventually forced out of the company with a $40 million golden parachute. O’Reilly received a $25 million settlement as part of his deal to leave.

Over the weekend, Hannity posted a Twitter rant after he was named by The New York Times as one of President Donald Trump’s private advisers. He called the story “total fake news speculation,” then wondered if the Times had found out whom he talks to because perhaps he’s being “surveilled and unmasked by the NSA.”

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in Faux News

 

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ANOTHER Fox News Lawsuit Grows – Racial Harassment of Black Employees

What has been obvious to a lot of observers for a long time, with the Faux News Network constant stream of on-air racism and vitriol is that it had serious problems, Not just with its on-air personalities, buy down in the very structure of the company.

Bigots hire bigots…and sexual molester stick together.

Bill O’Reilly Is Gone, But Fox News’s Legal Nightmare Continues

The Murdochs hoped firing Bill O’Reilly would signal a changing culture at Fox News. “We want to underscore our consistent commitment to fostering a work environment built on the values of trust and respect,” Rupert and his sons, James and Lachlan, wrote in a memo to Fox News employees on Wednesday. But the dismissal of Fox News’s highest rated host isn’t going to end the crisis at the network. The toxic culture, fostered for 20 years by former CEO Roger Ailes, is proving far more difficult to remedy.

Next week, according to sources, seven black Fox News employees plan to join a racial discrimination suit filed last month by two colleagues. The original lawsuit alleged that Fox News’s longtime comptroller, Judy Slater, subjected members of Fox’s payroll staff to racial insults for years. (Fox News fired Slater in February after those employees began litigation against the network.)

Lawyers representing the payroll employees are demanding that Fox’s accounting director, Tammy Efinger, also be removed from supervising an employee because she allegedly participated in Slater’s racist behavior. In a letter to the network’s lawyers obtained by New York, the attorneys state: “Not once did Ms. Efinger step in or attempt to interfere with Ms. Slater’s outrageous conduct.” The letter adds, instead, “Ms. Efinger chose to laugh or giggle following Ms. Slater’s vitriol.”

The letter also includes new allegations of racism in Fox News’s accounting department. According to the plaintiffs’ attorneys, Slater demanded that black employees hold “arm wrestling matches’” with white female employees in her office, just down the hall from Ailes’s office on the 2nd floor of Fox headquarters. “Forcing a black woman employee to ‘fight’ for the amusement and pleasure of her white superiors is horrifying. This highly offensive and humiliating act is reminiscent of Jim Crow era battle royals,” the letter says, referring to the practice of paying black men to fight blindfolded at carnivals for white spectators’ entertainment. The lawyers argue that Efinger bragged about wanting to “fight” a black employee.

The new claims, if true, reveal not just the failures of the legal and HR departments to deal with problematic managers but also just how deep the culture of discrimination and harassment may have run during Ailes’s reign.

Reached for comment, an attorney representing the employees, Jeanne Christensen, said, “There will be more complaints forthcoming in the next few days.”

A Fox News spokesperson said: “We can’t comment on a lawsuit that we haven’t seen yet.”

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2017 in Faux News

 

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