RSS

You Want Some Hot Sauce With That?

Naaaaaw!

Police: Man urinates in Walmart while stuffing trout in his pants

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – A Clarksville man has been arrested after allegedly urinating on the floor of a Walmart store while attempting to shoplift.

According to an arrest warrant a witness told police that 56-year-old David Wylie was spotted concealing merchandise. He then tried to exit the store without paying.

The witness said while Wylie was attempting to hide a package of trout in his pants, he urinated on the sales floor.

Police were called to take Wylie into custody and said he smelled like alcohol.

The warrants states that Wylie admitted to drinking and urinating on the floor, but repeatedly told police he wasn’t concerned because he thought all of his offenses were misdemeanors.

He was charged with shoplifting, vandalism, indecent exposure, and public intoxication. His bond was set at $2,000.

Records show that Wylie has a lengthy criminal history.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 12, 2016 in Nawwwwww!

 

Tags: , , ,

Erica Garner Endorses Bernie Sanders

A powerful endorsement of Sanders by Eric Garner’s daughter…

Erica has joined a growing group of women supporting Sanders. Hillary may not be able to take the woman vote for granted.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 12, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , ,

The Unequal Opportunity Race and White Resentment

The following is a video which has been shown at thousands of schools around the country which contextualizes racism and American history in terms of a track meet.  This video caused quite a storm recently in a county north of Richmond, Va,,,The old capital city of he confederacy. The county has banned the video. I guess it hit too close to home.

Parents outraged after students shown ‘white guilt’ cartoon for Black History Month

A Virginia school district has banned the use of an educational video about racial inequality after some parents complained that its messaging is racially divisive.

The four-minute, animated video — “Structural Discrimination: The Unequal Opportunity Race” — was shown last week to students at an assembly at Glen Allen High School, in Henrico County, as a part of the school’s Black History Month program.

The video contextualizes historic racial disparity in the United States using the metaphor of a race track in which runners face different obstacles depending upon their racial background. It has been shown hundreds of thousands of times at schools and workshops across the country since it was created more than a decade ago, according to the African American Policy Forum, which produced it.

“The video is designed for the general public,” said Luke Harris, co-founder of the African American Policy Forum and an associate professor of political science at Vassar College. “We produced something you could show in elementary and secondary schools or in college studies courses.”

He added: “We found that the video has a huge impact on the people that we’re showing it to. Most of us know very little about the social history of the United States and its contemporary impact. It was designed as a tool to throw light on American history.”

But in Glen Allen, about 14 miles north of Richmond, some parents complained, calling it a “white guilt video.”

Henrico County Public Schools officials initially defended the video, saying it was “one component of a thoughtful discussion in which all viewpoints were encouraged.” But after the story began to spread nationally, school officials switched gears, labeling the video “racially divisive” two days later.

“The Henrico School Board and administration consider this to be a matter of grave concern,” School Board Chair Micky Ogburn said in a statement released to The Washington Post. “We are making every effort to respond to our community. It is our goal to prevent the recurrence of this type of event. School leaders have been instructed not to use the video in our schools.”

 
1 Comment

Posted by on February 12, 2016 in The Definition of Racism, The New Jim Crow

 

Tags: , , , , ,

NYPD Cop Found Guilty in Akai Gurley Murder

The NYC Prosecutors finally convict a cop…Of course the convicted cop is a minority, which unfortunately may have something to do with the willingness to prosecute.

A Guilty Verdict in the Akai Gurley Case

A Brooklyn jury convicts Officer Peter Liang of manslaughter and official misconduct in the 2014 shooting.

A New York jury found an officer guilty on Thursday for the 2014 shooting and death of Akai Gurley, an unarmed black man killed in the stairwell of a Brooklyn apartment building.

The Brooklyn Supreme Court found Officer Peter Liang guilty of manslaughter and official misconduct, for shooting, then failing to help Gurley after he lay dying. Liang had faced five counts in all, including assault, reckless endangerment, and criminal negligent homicide.

The trial went to jury Tuesday. At closing arguments, Liang’s lawyers asked the judge to declare a mistrial, saying the prosecution made an “inflammatory and inappropriate” argument when they said Liang intentionally shot Gurley.

He chose to point his gun,” said the prosecutor, Joseph Alexis. “He chose to put his finger on the trigger, to fire the gun.”

“What happened here is a tragedy,” argued Rae Koshetz, one of Liang’s attorneys. “It’s a terrible tragedy, but it’s not a crime.”

Liang shot Gurley, a 28-year-old father of two in a dark hallway of a public-housing building. The rookie officer and his parter were on a routine patrol of the Louis H. Pink Houses when they opened a door to the stairwell on the eighth floor. With the lights out, Liang unholstered his 9mm Glock handgun and held a flashlight. When he walked into the stairwell, Liang told jurors he heard a “quick” sound that startled him, “and the gun just went off after I tensed up.”

The defense had argued that unholstering the gun––despite no obvious threat––fell in line with protocol, because the building was known to be dangerous. They said as he entered, Liang held his finger off the trigger, just as he was supposed to.

Liang’s willingness to walk around a public-housing building with a drawn weapon raised the issue of reasonable force––something that has played out across the nation and has gained increasing attention amid the shootings by police of unarmed black men and women. In this case, the prosecution argued that Liang’s decision to to unholster his gun was “reckless and deadly choice.”

Just before Liang fired, Gurley and his girlfriend, Melissa Butler, had walked into the stairwell one floor below. The elevator was out. As Liang’s gun fired, the bullet hit Gurley in the chest.

Liang said he wasn’t immediately aware of this. Not yet. While Butler screamed and ran to find help and a phone, Liang and his partner, Shaun Landau, walked back into the hallway they’d come from and debated who would call in to report that Liang had fired his gun. It was only after Liang went to search for his bullet that he heard someone crying, he said. It was then he he realized what had happened.

But even then, neither Liang nor Landau tried to save Gurley. Instead, the prosecution said Liang worried “whether his mistake would cost him his job,” asThe New York Times wrote

Liang will be sentenced on April 14. He faces 15 years in prison.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on February 12, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Before BLM – US Army Sergeant Isaac Woodard

The physical abuse and murder of black people by forces of “the law” didn’t begin with Trayon Martin…

The story of Isaac Woodard and the 1946 police beating that opened America’s eyes

On the evening of February 12, 1946, Isaac Woodard, a 26-year-old black Army veteran, boarded a bus in Augusta, Georgia. Earlier that day, he’d been honorably discharged, and he was heading to Winnsboro, South Carolina to reunite with his wife.

The bus driver made a stop en route. When Woodard asked if he had time to use the bathroom, the driver cursed loudly at him. Woodard would later admit in a depositionthat he cursed back.

Neither man said anything until the bus stopped in Batesburg, South Carolina. There, the driver told the local police about Woodard’s impudence. Woodard was ordered off the bus. When Woodard tried to give his version of events, a police officer struck him with a night stick. Woodard was escorted to the jail, where, he later testified, he was repeatedly beaten by the police chief, Linwood Shull. Woodard said that Shull pounded him in his eyes with the end of the night stick until he blacked out (charges Shull would deny).

Once Woodard regained consciousness, he couldn’t see.

Woodard was charged with disorderly conduct, with the police claiming he’d been intoxicated. Witnesses, however, said he hadn’t been drinking. After paying a fine, Woodard was driven to a veterans’ hospital in Columbia, where doctors told him he would be permanently blind.

The NAACP took on Woodard’s cause. A benefit concert for Woodward in New York City included such entertainers as Orson Welles, Woody Guthrie, Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday and Milton Berle. Woodard’s fight for justice would reach the Oval Office, with its shadow even touching the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education.

Over the years, Woodward’s beating receded behind more publicized stories like the lynching of Emmett Till. But with police brutality remaining a problem in many African-American communities today, it’s appropriate to highlight an important – and unappreciated – story of the civil rights movement.

A battle raging on the homefront

Woodard was one of the estimated one million African-Americans who served in the U.S. military during World War II. They fought for their country on foreign soil and for racial equality on their own soil. Black soldiers served in segregated units on segregated bases. In return for fighting for their country, black veterans believed they deserved nothing less than the equality granted to every other citizen under the Constitution.

But in the postwar years, many feared that any attempt to topple Jim Crow laws would result in prolonged racial conflict. Richmond Times-Dispatch editor Virginius Dabneywarned that overturning Jim Crow would leave “hundreds, if not thousands, killed and amicable race relations set back for decades.”

Blacks who challenged prevailing laws often found themselves jailed, beaten or worse. Some of that violence was directed against black soldiers, some of whom were murdered in their uniforms.

While Woodard lived to tell his story, his blindness left him unable to make a living. Woodard knew if he stayed in the South, he had no chance for justice against Shull, so he moved to New York City to live with his parents.

Once Woodard settled in New York City, he contacted Walter White, executive secretary of the NAACP, who wrote a letter to Orson Welles, the writer, director and star of the movie Citizen Kane. Welles also wrote a syndicated newspaper column and broadcast a weekly political commentary on the radio.

“We have had many horrible cases pass through this office,” White wrote to Welles, “but never one worse than this.”

Welles delivered a series of radio commentaries on Woodard’s behalf in July and August 1946. On July 28, Welles demanded that those responsible for Woodard’s attack be prosecuted. Welles vowed to fight for Woodard because he had fought for his country.

“The blind soldier fought for me in this war, the least I can do is fight for him. I have eyes. He hasn’t. I have a voice on the radio. He hasn’t,” Welles said. “I was born a white man, and until a colored man is a full citizen, like me, I haven’t the leisure to enjoy the freedom that a colored man risked his life to maintain for me. Until somebody beats me and blinds me I am in his debt.” …Read the Rest Here

 
1 Comment

Posted by on February 12, 2016 in Black History, BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Cleveland Sues Tamir Rice Family for Ambulance Bill

The victims get a bill from the city whose police murdered their son!

The Thug in this case is the City of Cleveland

‘Insult to Homicide’: Cleveland Sues Tamir Rice’s Family for Ambulance Fees

The city has filed a suit demanding $500 in payment for emergency treatment for the boy after a police officer fatally shot him.

What’s more outrageous than having a police officer shoot an unarmed 12-year-old, failing to provide medical care, keeping his family forcibly from the scene, and then declining to indict the officer for the death? In most cases, little. But the city of Cleveland has found a way: It is suing Tamir Rice’s family for not paying the ambulance bill after a Cleveland cop shot and killed the boy in November 2014.

As the Scene reports, Cleveland has filed a claim in probate court, seeking $500 from Rice’s estate to pay for emergency medical services rendered after Officer Timothy Loehmann fatally shot the boy. The charge is especially galling because Loehmann and another officer apparently had no training or equipment to provide aid to Rice after they shot him. They did nothing for four minutes until an FBI agent who happened to be nearby took over.

“The callousness, insensitivity, and poor judgment required for the city to send a bill—its own police officers having slain 12-year-old Tamir—is breathtaking,” Subodh Chandra, a Rice family attorney, said in a statement. “This adds insult to homicide.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 11, 2016 in American Genocide, BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Congressional Black Caucus Endorses HIllary

No big surprise here. Whichever candidate Clyburn supports will likely win South Carolina. He has remained neutral so far. What this likely means is that Hillary will get a boost in South Carolina, although with Sanders inroads into the millennial generation, it certainly does not mean a slam dunk for Hillary. One of the things unknown at this point is how large the groundswell is against the Old Skool Politics of getting nothing done in the black community. I

Hillary attending what the CBC does best – throwing expensive parties for themselves.

Congressional Black Caucus backs Hillary Clinton

The Congressional Black Caucus’ political action committee endorsed Hillary Clinton Thursday, just as the Democratic presidential candidate is set to battle with rival Bernie Sanders at a PBS-hosted debate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The CBC PAC formally announced its support of Clinton at a news conference near the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.

“We must have a president who is knowledgeable on both domestic and foreign policy,” CBC chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-North Carolina, said Thursday. “Black lives are being lost on the streets of America because of police misconduct and gang violence…and so we must have a president that understands the racial divide.”

“After considering the entire field, there is no question in our mind and in our minds that one single candidate — one — possesses the patience, experience and temperament,” Butterfield continued, naming Clinton.

CBC members will hit the trail for the candidate in states where African Americans could swing the outcome of the primary, focusing particularly on South Carolina, where Democrats will gather to vote on Feb. 27.

One South Carolina member of the CBC, Rep. James Clyburn, has decided to remain neutral, despite the caucus’ choice to endorse.

But Clyburn, the third-ranking Democrat in the House and a giant in South Carolina politics, recently told MSNBC in an interview that he may change his mind.

“We’ll be meeting with family and friends this weekend when I get down to South Carolina and I’ll make some decision after that,” Clyburn said Thursday. “I won’t be making any endorsements today or this week.” Clyburn remained neutral in 2008, as well.

Last month, the CBC chairman Butterfield announced his endorsement for Clinton.

Butterfield penned an editorial for African American news outlet The Grio in January saying it “was not a hard decision” to back the former secretary of state.

“The black community matters, and black votes matter, which is why I publicly and proudly support Hillary Clinton for president,” Butterfield wrote. “From fixing the criminal justice system and reforming the voting process to creating jobs and promoting a diverse workplace, Clinton’s ambitions match our own.”

Clinton has courted minority voters throughout her campaign, which has led to her popularity in states with large African American and Latino populations.

That support has not helped Clinton in the nation’s first nominating contests, since Iowa and New Hampshire have little racial diversity.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on February 11, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 225 other followers