Tag Archives: failure

Clown Bus Update

Gradually moving from that triple decker…

To a Short Bus. Another one bites the dust!



Bobby Jindal Drops Out Of The 2016 Presidential Race

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) ended his presidential campaign on Tuesday.

“I’ve come to the realization that this is not my time, so I’ve come here to announce that I am suspending my campaign for president of the United States,” he told Fox News’ Bret Baier.

Jindal, who entered the presidential race in June, has remained near the back of the Republican pack since then. In recent months, his persistently low polling numbers relegated him to the smaller televised events (AKA the KIddie Table) that preceded each of the main GOP debates.

Republicans to Jindal, “We already got our Minority…It ain’t you.”


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Posted by on November 18, 2015 in The Clown Bus


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How Australia Kicks American Behind on Student Loans

Australia is a country with only about 22 million people, principally concentrated within 12 miles of the Ocean. Despite other issues with racism and the historical treatment of indigenous people – they get some other things right. Educating the populace being one. COnservatism in America has screwed up developing a real education system which benefits the masses…And the country. Much like they have screwed up Medical Care and everything else they have touched.

How Australia Gets Student Loans Right

And why it should make Americans very, very jealous.

Graduate from college this year? Congratulations! If you borrowed money, you likely need to pay back more than $35,000. Just how bad is that? Well, the average American with credit-card debt owes less than half that amount. Perhaps that’s why MyBankTracker recently discovered 30 percent of those they polled would agree to sell an organ in order to pay off their student loan bills.

Good luck getting started in the world with that amount of debt—one reason why many economists believe millennials aren’t buying homes or cars at the same age their parents did.

It doesn’t have to be this way—and it isn’t in many other places. Let’s visit Australia, where politicians congratulated themselves this week for closing down what they considered a major loophole in the nation’s student loan program: scofflaws moving abroad to escape the automatic salary deductions of the nation’s income-based student loan program. “You should have to repay that debt,” thundered Simon Birmingham, the nation’s education minister.

But that’s still not true for everyone. Earn less than $54,000 Australian dollars—that’s about $38,000 in the United States—and you have no worries, at least for now and maybe not forever.

Australia offers students an income-based student loan plan, and has since 1989, when the system was set up to compensate for the fact that universities were charging tuition at all. That was a change. Higher education had been free in the 1970s and 1980s.

Today, there are two ways Aussies can choose to finance their college educations. If they pay up front, they get a 10 percent discount. Most don’t do that, however. That’s where where Australia’s income-based repayment plan comes in.

Australians borrow money from the government through the Higher Education Loan Program (or HELP—get it?) and related offshoots. When it comes time to repay the bill, the monthly amount has nothing to do with the sum borrowed. Instead, debtors earning more than AU$54,000 ($38,000) pay between 4 and 8 percent of their income, depending on how much they take home annually. Unemployment or illness? Salary falls under the minimum earnings required for repayment? No worries. Payments temporarily cease, with no interest or penalties accruing to the borrower.

Moreover, unlike in the United States, where students need to make strategic decisions whether to consolidate their loans at a particular interest rate because they will not get a do-over, there’s no such issue in Australia. The interest rate is set by the consumer price Index—that is, the rate of inflation.

Finally, making payments is easy. It’s an automatic deduction, courtesy of theAustralian Taxation Office. (This is how the expat loophole developed.) And, yes, a borrower can repay the loan early, if he or she so desires.

Another great thing? Unlike certain American politicians (Hi Marco Rubio!), Australian pols don’t complain about the number of philosophy majors running up debt they can’t pay off. If a student attends a public university in Australia—something the vast majority do—tuition is set, in part, by the course of study. The greater the expected lifetime income return, the greater the cost. So a degree in the humanities costs less than a degree in education, which costs less than a medical education.

I don’t mean to make this sound like nirvana. Australians are increasingly worried about the amount of student-related debt, which is growing rapidly. (One estimate has it surging from AU$50.3 billion this year to AU$70.4 billion in 2018.) That means students will owe more money, likely paying it off over a longer period of time. There is also concern over what those down under like to call “doubtful” debt—estimates are that 20 percent of students will never be flush enough to repay their loans, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

There are other costs associated with the program as well. The government borrows money on the open market at a higher rate of interest than the inflation rate. As a result, there have been proposals to change the interest rate benchmark to Australia’s 10-year treasury note, but so far that hasn’t come to pass.

Australians also have the equivalent of our for-profit college problem. Like, say, the late Corinthian Colleges, a number of the private vocational programs in Australia aggressively recruit nontraditional students, offer them less-than-adequate educations, and then stick them with the bill. Earlier this year, the University of Sydney’s Honi Soit reported representatives for one such program were cold-calling potential recruits. “On the phone, the lady went on to devalue bachelor degrees and stated it was better to have lots of certificates and diplomas as it’s what employers look for,” one recipient recalled.

Nonetheless, income-based repayment plans remain popular, so much so that the opposition Labor Party recently announced that if it were elected to power, it would push a plan to offer students a new line of credit, one designed to encourage recent graduates to pursue entrepreneurial initiatives. The party calls it a “start-up year.”

The U.S. Department of Education does offer students income-based loan programs, for which borrowers need apply. And that’s proved a problem. The U.S. Government Accountability Office recently found that the Department of Education has “not consistently notified borrowers who have entered repayment about the plans.” In addition, the interest rate the United States charges is higher. One thing we do here the Australians don’t: We forgive the debt if it’s not repaid after a period of time—most often 20 or 25 years, depending on the plan. But, then again, you’ll potentially pay taxes on the amount forgiven. Those working in public service can have their loan forgiven after 10 years, with no tax penalty.*…

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Posted by on November 18, 2015 in American Genocide


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Meg Whitman – Carly FIorina “Unqualified”

Ouch! This one is going to leave a mark. Fellow CEO (former in Carly’s situation) Meg Whitman – who is credited with building EBay and is currently President of Hewlett Packard…

AND Fellow Republican…

Unloads on Republican Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina!

Meg Whitman

HP CEO Says That Carly Fiorina Is Not Qualified To Be President

“Literally having some experience in politics is probably an important criteria,” Meg Whitman says.

Current Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman doesn’t think former HP CEO Carly Fiorina is qualified to be president because the Republican contender has no political experience.

“I just think literally having some experience in politics is probably an important criteria for the highest office in the land,” Whitman told CNN over the weekend. “I think it’s very difficult for your first role in politics to be president of the United States. I think having experience in the Senate or as the governor of a state is really important. It’s just hard to be dropped down in Washington, D.C. never having experience in politics before.”

Indeed, only three U.S. presidents have landed the job without some experience in elected office. However, those three — Ulysses Grant, Zachary Taylor and Dwight Eisenhower — all served in top leadership positions in the U.S. military.

Whitman’s been running HP since 2011, when she took on the role after a run of disastrous leadership at the struggling computer maker, and she is now preparing to split the company into two publicly traded entities. She’s probably most well-known for leading eBay from a startup to a booming auction site, but she did try her hand at politics in a failed run for governor of California. That’s another thing she has in common with Fiorina, who lost a bid for senator in California in 2010.

Whitman also happens to be backing New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in his bid for the presidential nomination. He’s not exactly the leading candidate for the role, and Whitman has declined to say who she will ultimately support in next year’s election.

Good thing Carly got that “Get out of Dodge” Golden Parachute…

The only Board I can see hiring her after her serial lies and “reality dysfunction” this election…Would be a circular firing squad.

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Posted by on November 2, 2015 in The Clown Bus


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Republicans Finally Admit GW Bush Screwed Up on 9/11

Donald Trumps mouth runs constantly. whether it is saying something self-ingratiatingly idiotic, racist lies and untruths…

And occasionally a few uncomfortable truths salted in to save himself from the garbage disposal of complete lunacy.

The ugly truth is that George W. Bush was quite possibly the worst President in American History. His administration did more damage to the country than any enemy of the country could have ever conceived. 9/11 and the Iraq Invasion were just a small part of it.

The reason Republicans have to stoke white resentment and racism, is the simple fact that they have so few examples of the “core conservative principles” ever working.

Trump Is Right About 9/11

George W. Bush didn’t do all he could to prevent the attack—and it’s time Republicans confronted that fact.

Donald Trump utters plenty of ugly untruths: that undocumented Mexican immigrants are “rapists,” that Syrian refugees are committing “all sorts of attacks” in Germany and represent a “Trojan Horse” for ISIS. But he tells ugly truths too: that “when you give [politicians money], they do whatever the hell you want them to do.” And that “the Middle East would be safer” if Saddam Hussein and Muammer Qaddafi were still in power.

His latest ugly truth came during a Bloomberg TV interview last Friday, when he said George W. Bush deserves responsibility for the fact that “the World Trade Center came down during his time.” Politicians and journalists erupted in indignation. Jeb Bush calledTrump’s comments “pathetic.” Ben Carson dubbedthem “ridiculous.”

Former Bush flack Ari Fleischer called Trump a 9/11 “truther.” Even Stephanie Ruhle, the Bloomberg anchor who asked the question, cried, “Hold on, you can’t blame George Bush for that.”


Oh yes, you can. There’s no way of knowing for sure if Bush could have stopped the September 11 attacks. But that’s not the right question. The right question is: Did Bush do everything he could reasonably have to stop them, given what he knew at the time? And he didn’t. It’s not even close.

When the Bush administration took office in January 2001, CIA Director George Tenet and National Security Council counterterrorism “czar” Richard Clarke both warned its incoming officials that al-Qaeda represented a grave threat. During a transition briefing early that month at Blair House, according to Bob Woodward’s Bush at War, Tenet and his deputy James Pavitt listed Osama bin Laden as one of America’s three most serious national-security challenges. That same month, Clarke presented National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice with a plan he had been working on since al-Qaeda’s attack on the USS Cole the previous October. It called for freezing the network’s assets, closing affiliated charities, funneling money to the governments of Uzbekistan, the Philippines and Yemen to fight al-Qaeda cells in their country, initiating air strikes and covert operations against al-Qaeda sites in Afghanistan, and dramatically increasing aid to the Northern Alliance, which was battling al-Qaeda and the Taliban there.


But both Clarke and Tenet grew deeply frustrated by the way top Bush officials responded. Clarke recounts that when he briefed Rice about al-Qaeda, “her facial expression gave me the impression that she had never heard the term before.” On January 25, Clarke sent Rice a memo declaring that, “we urgently need…a Principals [Cabinet] level review on the al Qida [sic] network.” Instead, Clarke got a sub-cabinet, Deputies level, meeting in April, two months after the one on Iraq.

When that April meeting finally occurred, according to Clarke’s book, Against All Enemies, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz objected that “I just don’t understand why we are beginning by talking about this one man, bin Laden.” Clarke responded that, “We are talking about a network of terrorist organizations called al-Qaeda, that happens to be led by bin Laden, and we are talking about that network because it and it alone poses an immediate and serious threat to the United States.” To which Wolfowitz replied, “Well, there are others that do as well, at least as much. Iraqi terrorism for example.”

By early summer, Clarke was so despondent that he asked to be reassigned. “This administration,” he later testified, “didn’t either believe me that there was an urgent problem or was unprepared to act as though there were an urgent problem. And I thought, if the administration doesn’t believe its national coordinator for counterterrorism when he says there’s an urgent problem and if it’s unprepared to act as though there’s an urgent problem, then probably I should get another job.” In July, the Deputies Committee finally agreed to schedule a Principals level meeting on Clarke’s plan. But the schedule for July was already full, and in August too many Cabinet members were on vacation, so the meeting was set for September.

During that same time period, the CIA was raising alarms too. According to Kurt Eichenwald, a former New York Times reporter given access to the Daily Briefs prepared by the intelligence agencies for President Bush in the spring and summer of 2001, the CIA told the White House by May 1 that “a group presently in the United States” was planning a terrorist attack. On June 22, the Daily Brief warned that al-Qaeda strikes might be “imminent.”

But the same Defense Department officials who discounted Clarke’s warnings pushed back against the CIA’s. According to Eichenwald’s sources, “the neoconservative leaders who had recently assumed power at the Pentagon were warning the White House that the C.I.A. had been fooled; according to this theory, Bin Laden was merely pretending to be planning an attack to distract the administration from Saddam Hussein, whom the neoconservatives saw as a greater threat.”

The CIA fought back. “The U.S. is not the target of a disinformation campaign by Usama Bin Laden,” declared the Daily Brief on June 29, noting that the al-Qaeda leader had recently told a Middle Eastern journalist to expect an attack. The following day, the CIA included in its Daily Brief an article entitled “Bin Laden Threats Are Real.” On July 1, the Brief predicted that an attack “will occur soon.”

Then, on July 10, Tenet and CIA counterterrorism head Cofer Black held an emergency meeting with Rice to push for action against Bin Laden. But according to Woodward’s State of Denial, “both felt they were not getting through to Rice.” She “seemed focused on other administration priorities, especially the ballistic defense missile system that Bush had campaigned on” and “Tenet left the meeting feeling frustrated.”

By this point, staffers at CIA counterterrorism headquarters had grown so dejected that they, like Clarke, debated asking for a transfer.

The warnings continued. On July 11, the CIA sent word to the White House that a Chechen with links to al-Qaeda had warned that something big was coming. On July 24, the Daily Brief said the expected al-Qaeda attack had been postponed but was still being planned. Finally, on August 6, the CIA titled its Daily Brief: “Bin Ladin Determined to Strike the US.” The briefing didn’t mention a specific date or target, but it did mention the possibility of attack in New York and mentioned that the terrorists might hijack airplanes. In Angler, Barton Gellman notes that it was the 36th time the CIA had raised al-Qaeda with President Bush since he took office.

On September 4, the Cabinet met and despite Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld’s insistence that Iraq represented the greater terrorism threat, it approved Clarke’s plan to fight al-Qaeda. On September 9, the Senate Armed Services Committee recommended taking $600 million from the proposed missile defense budget and devoting it to counter-terrorism. According to Gellman, Rumsfeld recommended that Bush veto such a move.

On the morning of September 11, 2001, Clarke’s anti-al-Qaeda plan was sitting on Bush’s desk, awaiting his signature. It was the ninth National Security Presidential Directive of his presidency.

Would the Bush administration have stopped the 9/11 attacks had it taken the threat more seriously? Possibly. On August 3, a Saudi named Mohamed al-Kahtani tried to enter the United States in Orlando, Florida, allegedly to participate in the 9/11 plot. He was sent back home by a customs official whose only concern was that he might become an illegal immigrant. On August 16, FBI and INS agents in Minnesota arrested another potential hijacker, Zacarias Moussaoui, after being tipped off by his flight instructor. But despite numerous requests, they were denied permission to search his apartment or laptop. These incidents “might have exposed the” 9/11 plot, writes Eichenwald, “had the government been on high alert.”…Read the Rest Here…



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Ted Cruz Gets Smacked Down by Fellow Republicans

This has been a long time coming…The Adults are moving to take control back.

Cruz sternly rebuked by GOP

Ted Cruz can’t even get a protest vote in the Senate anymore.

On Monday night, Cruz’s colleagues ignored his attempt to disrupt Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to fund the government without attacking Planned Parenthood. In an unusual rebuke, even fellow Republicans denied him a “sufficient second” that would have allowed him a roll call vote.

Then, his Republican colleagues loudly bellowed “no” when Cruz sought a voice vote, a second repudiation that showed how little support Cruz has: Just one other GOP senator — Utah’s Mike Lee — joined with Cruz as he was overruled by McConnell and his deputies.

It was the second time that Cruz had been denied a procedural courtesy that’s routinely granted to senators in both parties. The first came after he called McConnell a liar this summer.

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Posted by on September 29, 2015 in The Clown Bus


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What Happened to That American Exceptionalism? There is None Anymore…

America has been on the decline since Raygun – despite on small moment of high achievement and expectations during the Clinton Administration.

The lang fall into mediocrity in America can be traced directly to the steps of the conservatives in America. Al most every country which is superior to the US in any category has a government and social system which conservatives would call “socialism”. Quite frankly – socialism is kicking our ass.

I am going to start with parts of an article in Fortune Magazine… 12 signs America is on the decline.

1. Median household income

Rank of U.S.: 27th out of 27 high-income countries

Americans may feel like global leaders, but Spain, Cyprus and Qatar all have higher median household incomes than America’s (about $54,000). So does much of Europe and the industrialized world. Per capita median income in the US ($18,700) is also relatively low–and unchanged since 2000. A middle-class Canadian’s income is now higher.

2. Education and skills

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 23 countries

The US ranked near the bottom in a skills survey by theOrganization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which examined European and other developed nations. In its Skills Outlook 2013, the US placed 16th in adult literacy, 21st in adult numeracy out of 23, and 14th in problem-solving. Spots in prestigious US universities are highly sought-after. Yet higher education, once an effective way out of poverty in the US, isn’t anymore – at least not for lower-income and minority students. The authors quote studies showing, for example, that today 80% of white college students attend Barron’s Top 500 schools, while 75% of black and Latino students go to two-year junior colleges or open-admissions (not Top 500) schools. Poor students are also far less likely to complete a degree.

3. Internet speed and access

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 34 countries

Broadband access has become essential for industry to grow and flourish. Yet in the US, penetration is low andspeed relatively slow versus wealthy nations—thought thecost of internet is among the highest ($0.04 per megabit per second in Japan, for example, versus $0.53 in the US). The problem may be too much concentration and too little competition in the industry, the authors suggest.

4. Health

Rank of U.S.: 33rd out of 145 countries

When it comes to its citizens’ health, in countries that are home to at least one million people, the US ranks below many other wealthy countries. More American women also are dying during pregnancy and childbirth, the authors note, quoting a Lancet study. For every 100,000 births in the United States, 18.5 women die. Saudi Arabia and Canada have half that maternal death rate.

5. People living below the poverty line

Rank of U.S.: 36th out of 162 countries, behind Morocco and Albania

Officially, 14.5% of Americans are impoverished — 45.3 million people–according to the latest US Census data.That’s a larger fraction of the population in poverty than Morocco and Albania (though how nations define poverty varies considerably). The elderly have Social Security, with its automatic cost-of-living adjustments, to thank, the authors say, for doing better: Few seniors (one in 10) are poor today versus 50 years ago (when it was one in three). Poverty is also down among African Americans. Now America’s poor are more often in their prime working years, or in households headed by single mothers.

6. Children in poverty

Rank of U.S.: 34th out of 35 countries surveyed

When UNICEF relative poverty – relative to the average in each society—the US ranked at the bottom, above only Romania, even as Americans are, on average, six times richer than Romanians. Children in all of Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan fare better.

7. Income inequality

Rank of U.S.: Fourth highest inequality in the world.

The authors argue that the most severe inequality can be found in Chile, Mexico, Turkey — and the US. Citing the Gini coefficient, a common inequality metric, and data from Wall Street Journal/Mercer Human Resource Consulting, they say this inequality slows economic growth, impedes youths’ opportunities, and ultimately threatens the nation’s future (an OECD video explains). Worsening income inequality is also evident in the ratio of averageCEO earnings to average workers’ pay. That ratio went from 24:1 in 1965 to 262:1 in 2005.

8. Prison population

Rank of U.S.: First out of 224 countries

More than 2.2 million Americans are in jail. Only China comes close, the authors write, with about 1.66 million.

9. Life satisfaction

Rank of U.S.: 17th out of 36 countries

The authors note Americans’ happiness score is only middling, according to the OECD Better Life Index. (The index measures how people evaluate their life as a whole rather than their current feelings.) People in New Zealand, Finland, and Israel rate higher in life satisfaction. A UN report had a similar finding.

10. Corruption

Rank of U.S.: 17th out of 175 countries.

Barbados and Luxembourg are ahead of the US when it comes to citizens’ perceptions of corruption. Americans view their country as “somewhat corrupt,” the authors note, according to Transparency International, a Berlin-based nonprofit. In a separate survey of American citizens, many said politicians don’t serve the majority’s interest, but are biased toward corporate lobbyists and the super-rich. “Special interest groups are gradually transforming the United States into an oligarchy,” the authors argue, “concerned only about the needs of the wealthy.”

11. Stability

Rank of U.S.: 20th out of 178 countries.

The Fragile States Index considers factors such as inequality, corruption, and factionalism. The US lags behind Portugal, Slovenia and Iceland.

12. Social progress index

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 133 countries

A broad measure of social well-being, the index comprises 52 economic indicators such as access to clean water and air, access to advanced education, access to basic knowledge, and safety. Countries surpassing the US include Ireland, the UK, Iceland, and Canada.

“If America’s going to be great again, we’ve got to start fixing things,” Friedman said.

Just for the heck of it, I am going to add a couple more…

Economic Mobility

If you work hard you can achieve”…A poor kid has a better chance of achieving reaching the higher economic levels in other countries. The US lag is getting worse.

The following chart only compares the 27 industrialized countries. The US actually drops to 17th if you include Second World Countries.

Infant Mortality

Your baby has a 2.5 times greater chance of dying prenatal, or postnatal covering the first year of life than in Japan or Finland. For black mothers that is about 4 times greater.

The US ranks 27th of the 27 Industrialized Nations… Comparing it to all nations we are about 40th behind Cuba.

Suicide Rate

America is in the middle of the pack. However the rate of suicides in the US exceeds that of Libya, the Central African Republic, Brazil, and China to name a few. Mental health care in the US is seriously lacking.

Racial Discrimination and Violence Against Minorities (Ethnic or racial)

America is a sad 37th.

Educational Attainment

Guess what guys…America has dropped to 16th.

Face i…This country would be far better off deporting Republicans than Illegal Immigrants.


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Conservatives and False Equivalencies -Bobbity Jundal Goes Splat…Again

Bobby Jindal years ago as a Congressman was a pretty good politician. Met him after Katrina as part of the cleanup and recovery effort. He helped cut through the Bush Administration incompetence and racism, and helped forge a bipartisan coalition to help his State, Louisiana. So it really wasn’t a surprise to see him elected as Governor of the State, despite his disastrous Republican reply to the State of the Union. Somewhere along the way Jindal lost it, and became an idealogue. He has been a disaster for the school system in Louisiana, which already ranked as one of the nation’s worst – he has utterly cratered the State Budget with superfluous tax giveaways putting the State more than $2 billion, and bleeding over $500 million a year…And he has jumped, both feet in – to the culture wars.

He is now regarded by many as a failure as Governor, an ineffective speaker, and a bobblehead who continuously says stupid things that alienate people.

Bobbity is so bad, his polling against the rest of the Republican Clown Bus vying for the nomination to run for President…Is at 0%.

So now he jumps into the False Equivalency game in a desperate attempt to gain even a smidgen of relevancy.

The False Equivalency game is one played almost daily in conservative press and on Faux News. You’ve heard it, I am sure…

That somehow the murder of a white woman in San Francisco by an illegal immigrant likely for financial gain…

Is the same as Charleston, where a State Congressman and Minister, and 7 others were murdered in their Church the name of starting a “race war” by a white supremacist.

That black on black murder is somehow more of an issue than the murder of unarmed black youth by Police, who are supposedly there to protect them and maintain the law.

That the killing of a US Ambassador in Benghazi under Obama somehow is indicative of a failure of the Administration, and is far worse than the killing of 17 Americans in the Bombing of an Embassy In Lebanon in 1983, and the bombing of a Marine Barracks which killed 242 Marines under Reagan… Not to mention over 20 similar attacks against American Diplomats and Trade Representatives under the Bushit.

Bobby Jindal should just shut up: His simple-minded, dishonest Chattanooga comments make things worse

Bobbity’s Duck Dynasty Base

Among the first GOP candidates to comment on the tragic shooting in Chattanooga, Tennessee, was Bobby Jindal. His response was every bit as trite and empty as you’d expect it to be. In an exclusive interview with, Jindal said:

 “It’s time for the White House to wake up and tell the truth…and the truth is that Radical Islam is at war with us, and we must start by being honest about that. There have been many bad things that have happened under President Obama. One that stands out to me was the horrible shooting at Ft. Hood…which was clearly an act of terrorism by a Radical Islamist. Yet the White House labeled that horrible act as ‘workplace violence.’ This is grotesque. You cannot defeat evil until you admit that it exists.”

This statement is remarkably simpleminded and dishonest. In what sense has the White House failed to “tell the truth” about terrorism? Like so many Republicans, Jindal is obsessed with the superficial; he’s intentionally oblivious to what Obama has actually done. Obama has made it fairly clear that we’re at war with terrorists, especially Islamic terrorists. He’s been far more effective, in fact, than the previous Republican administration at finding and killing said terrorists (remember bin Laden?).

What’s dishonest about Jindal’s statement is the implication that what happened in Chattanooga is a policy failure on the part of Obama. That’s not at all the case. A man decided to sacrifice his life in order to kill other people. Just as the officer at Fort Hood decided, on his own, to kill innocent people. The truth is that there’s no real defense against that. Life in a free society involves certain risks. All the armies in the world can’t stop a lone gunman before he fires the first shot. This notion that if we dropped more bombs abroad or tightened immigration standards, we’d somehow be immune from attacks of this kind is a Republican fantasy, one no thinking person believes.

When something like this happens, our response should be simple: deal with it and carry on. Terrorism is a tactic — it’s not defeatable. The best we can do is limit the conditions that breed terrorists while fighting them when and where we must, which is what Obama has done since taking office. Exaggerating every isolated attack into an apocalyptic threat plays perfectly into the enemy’s narrative. Yet that’s exactly what Jindal does. Indeed, he warned that yesterday’s shooting (again, perpetrated by one man) is a reminder that we’re being colonized by Muslims.

 “What’s not acceptable is people that want to come and conquer us. That’s not immigration, by the way, that’s colonization,” Jindal said. This is preposterously stupid on every level. Yes, we’re in a real war. Yes, there are Muslim extremists that want to kill us. And yes, we have to take that seriously. But America isn’t being colonized. Suggesting otherwise is dangerous and needlessly alarmist.

The worst thing we can do, the thing Republicans often do, is blame a single person or party for a terrible and ultimately unavoidable attack. Republicans understand this when it’s the other way around. The logic Jindal uses to pin this attack on Obama applies equally to Bush during 9/11. Indeed, by any measure, the Bush administration was infinitely more responsible for that incident, as it involved dozens of people and months of preparation to which they remained blind. Can you imagine the GOP’s response if a Democratic candidate for president said, the day after 9/11, that it was Bush’s fault, that 3,000 people died because he failed to take terrorism seriously? True or not, they’d have considered that treasonous, at the very least.

Bobbity long ago crossed over into The Donald’s territory… And should be treated a Comedy (as the Donald is by a growing number of News sources) or Political Theater instead of any serious candidate.

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Posted by on July 18, 2015 in Black Conservatives


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