Tag Archives: failure

Ted Cruz Gets Smacked Down by Fellow Republicans

This has been a long time coming…The Adults are moving to take control back.

Cruz sternly rebuked by GOP

Ted Cruz can’t even get a protest vote in the Senate anymore.

On Monday night, Cruz’s colleagues ignored his attempt to disrupt Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to fund the government without attacking Planned Parenthood. In an unusual rebuke, even fellow Republicans denied him a “sufficient second” that would have allowed him a roll call vote.

Then, his Republican colleagues loudly bellowed “no” when Cruz sought a voice vote, a second repudiation that showed how little support Cruz has: Just one other GOP senator — Utah’s Mike Lee — joined with Cruz as he was overruled by McConnell and his deputies.

It was the second time that Cruz had been denied a procedural courtesy that’s routinely granted to senators in both parties. The first came after he called McConnell a liar this summer.

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Posted by on September 29, 2015 in The Clown Bus


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What Happened to That American Exceptionalism? There is None Anymore…

America has been on the decline since Raygun – despite on small moment of high achievement and expectations during the Clinton Administration.

The lang fall into mediocrity in America can be traced directly to the steps of the conservatives in America. Al most every country which is superior to the US in any category has a government and social system which conservatives would call “socialism”. Quite frankly – socialism is kicking our ass.

I am going to start with parts of an article in Fortune Magazine… 12 signs America is on the decline.

1. Median household income

Rank of U.S.: 27th out of 27 high-income countries

Americans may feel like global leaders, but Spain, Cyprus and Qatar all have higher median household incomes than America’s (about $54,000). So does much of Europe and the industrialized world. Per capita median income in the US ($18,700) is also relatively low–and unchanged since 2000. A middle-class Canadian’s income is now higher.

2. Education and skills

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 23 countries

The US ranked near the bottom in a skills survey by theOrganization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which examined European and other developed nations. In its Skills Outlook 2013, the US placed 16th in adult literacy, 21st in adult numeracy out of 23, and 14th in problem-solving. Spots in prestigious US universities are highly sought-after. Yet higher education, once an effective way out of poverty in the US, isn’t anymore – at least not for lower-income and minority students. The authors quote studies showing, for example, that today 80% of white college students attend Barron’s Top 500 schools, while 75% of black and Latino students go to two-year junior colleges or open-admissions (not Top 500) schools. Poor students are also far less likely to complete a degree.

3. Internet speed and access

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 34 countries

Broadband access has become essential for industry to grow and flourish. Yet in the US, penetration is low andspeed relatively slow versus wealthy nations—thought thecost of internet is among the highest ($0.04 per megabit per second in Japan, for example, versus $0.53 in the US). The problem may be too much concentration and too little competition in the industry, the authors suggest.

4. Health

Rank of U.S.: 33rd out of 145 countries

When it comes to its citizens’ health, in countries that are home to at least one million people, the US ranks below many other wealthy countries. More American women also are dying during pregnancy and childbirth, the authors note, quoting a Lancet study. For every 100,000 births in the United States, 18.5 women die. Saudi Arabia and Canada have half that maternal death rate.

5. People living below the poverty line

Rank of U.S.: 36th out of 162 countries, behind Morocco and Albania

Officially, 14.5% of Americans are impoverished — 45.3 million people–according to the latest US Census data.That’s a larger fraction of the population in poverty than Morocco and Albania (though how nations define poverty varies considerably). The elderly have Social Security, with its automatic cost-of-living adjustments, to thank, the authors say, for doing better: Few seniors (one in 10) are poor today versus 50 years ago (when it was one in three). Poverty is also down among African Americans. Now America’s poor are more often in their prime working years, or in households headed by single mothers.

6. Children in poverty

Rank of U.S.: 34th out of 35 countries surveyed

When UNICEF relative poverty – relative to the average in each society—the US ranked at the bottom, above only Romania, even as Americans are, on average, six times richer than Romanians. Children in all of Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan fare better.

7. Income inequality

Rank of U.S.: Fourth highest inequality in the world.

The authors argue that the most severe inequality can be found in Chile, Mexico, Turkey — and the US. Citing the Gini coefficient, a common inequality metric, and data from Wall Street Journal/Mercer Human Resource Consulting, they say this inequality slows economic growth, impedes youths’ opportunities, and ultimately threatens the nation’s future (an OECD video explains). Worsening income inequality is also evident in the ratio of averageCEO earnings to average workers’ pay. That ratio went from 24:1 in 1965 to 262:1 in 2005.

8. Prison population

Rank of U.S.: First out of 224 countries

More than 2.2 million Americans are in jail. Only China comes close, the authors write, with about 1.66 million.

9. Life satisfaction

Rank of U.S.: 17th out of 36 countries

The authors note Americans’ happiness score is only middling, according to the OECD Better Life Index. (The index measures how people evaluate their life as a whole rather than their current feelings.) People in New Zealand, Finland, and Israel rate higher in life satisfaction. A UN report had a similar finding.

10. Corruption

Rank of U.S.: 17th out of 175 countries.

Barbados and Luxembourg are ahead of the US when it comes to citizens’ perceptions of corruption. Americans view their country as “somewhat corrupt,” the authors note, according to Transparency International, a Berlin-based nonprofit. In a separate survey of American citizens, many said politicians don’t serve the majority’s interest, but are biased toward corporate lobbyists and the super-rich. “Special interest groups are gradually transforming the United States into an oligarchy,” the authors argue, “concerned only about the needs of the wealthy.”

11. Stability

Rank of U.S.: 20th out of 178 countries.

The Fragile States Index considers factors such as inequality, corruption, and factionalism. The US lags behind Portugal, Slovenia and Iceland.

12. Social progress index

Rank of U.S.: 16th out of 133 countries

A broad measure of social well-being, the index comprises 52 economic indicators such as access to clean water and air, access to advanced education, access to basic knowledge, and safety. Countries surpassing the US include Ireland, the UK, Iceland, and Canada.

“If America’s going to be great again, we’ve got to start fixing things,” Friedman said.

Just for the heck of it, I am going to add a couple more…

Economic Mobility

If you work hard you can achieve”…A poor kid has a better chance of achieving reaching the higher economic levels in other countries. The US lag is getting worse.

The following chart only compares the 27 industrialized countries. The US actually drops to 17th if you include Second World Countries.

Infant Mortality

Your baby has a 2.5 times greater chance of dying prenatal, or postnatal covering the first year of life than in Japan or Finland. For black mothers that is about 4 times greater.

The US ranks 27th of the 27 Industrialized Nations… Comparing it to all nations we are about 40th behind Cuba.

Suicide Rate

America is in the middle of the pack. However the rate of suicides in the US exceeds that of Libya, the Central African Republic, Brazil, and China to name a few. Mental health care in the US is seriously lacking.

Racial Discrimination and Violence Against Minorities (Ethnic or racial)

America is a sad 37th.

Educational Attainment

Guess what guys…America has dropped to 16th.

Face i…This country would be far better off deporting Republicans than Illegal Immigrants.


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Conservatives and False Equivalencies -Bobbity Jundal Goes Splat…Again

Bobby Jindal years ago as a Congressman was a pretty good politician. Met him after Katrina as part of the cleanup and recovery effort. He helped cut through the Bush Administration incompetence and racism, and helped forge a bipartisan coalition to help his State, Louisiana. So it really wasn’t a surprise to see him elected as Governor of the State, despite his disastrous Republican reply to the State of the Union. Somewhere along the way Jindal lost it, and became an idealogue. He has been a disaster for the school system in Louisiana, which already ranked as one of the nation’s worst – he has utterly cratered the State Budget with superfluous tax giveaways putting the State more than $2 billion, and bleeding over $500 million a year…And he has jumped, both feet in – to the culture wars.

He is now regarded by many as a failure as Governor, an ineffective speaker, and a bobblehead who continuously says stupid things that alienate people.

Bobbity is so bad, his polling against the rest of the Republican Clown Bus vying for the nomination to run for President…Is at 0%.

So now he jumps into the False Equivalency game in a desperate attempt to gain even a smidgen of relevancy.

The False Equivalency game is one played almost daily in conservative press and on Faux News. You’ve heard it, I am sure…

That somehow the murder of a white woman in San Francisco by an illegal immigrant likely for financial gain…

Is the same as Charleston, where a State Congressman and Minister, and 7 others were murdered in their Church the name of starting a “race war” by a white supremacist.

That black on black murder is somehow more of an issue than the murder of unarmed black youth by Police, who are supposedly there to protect them and maintain the law.

That the killing of a US Ambassador in Benghazi under Obama somehow is indicative of a failure of the Administration, and is far worse than the killing of 17 Americans in the Bombing of an Embassy In Lebanon in 1983, and the bombing of a Marine Barracks which killed 242 Marines under Reagan… Not to mention over 20 similar attacks against American Diplomats and Trade Representatives under the Bushit.

Bobby Jindal should just shut up: His simple-minded, dishonest Chattanooga comments make things worse

Bobbity’s Duck Dynasty Base

Among the first GOP candidates to comment on the tragic shooting in Chattanooga, Tennessee, was Bobby Jindal. His response was every bit as trite and empty as you’d expect it to be. In an exclusive interview with, Jindal said:

 “It’s time for the White House to wake up and tell the truth…and the truth is that Radical Islam is at war with us, and we must start by being honest about that. There have been many bad things that have happened under President Obama. One that stands out to me was the horrible shooting at Ft. Hood…which was clearly an act of terrorism by a Radical Islamist. Yet the White House labeled that horrible act as ‘workplace violence.’ This is grotesque. You cannot defeat evil until you admit that it exists.”

This statement is remarkably simpleminded and dishonest. In what sense has the White House failed to “tell the truth” about terrorism? Like so many Republicans, Jindal is obsessed with the superficial; he’s intentionally oblivious to what Obama has actually done. Obama has made it fairly clear that we’re at war with terrorists, especially Islamic terrorists. He’s been far more effective, in fact, than the previous Republican administration at finding and killing said terrorists (remember bin Laden?).

What’s dishonest about Jindal’s statement is the implication that what happened in Chattanooga is a policy failure on the part of Obama. That’s not at all the case. A man decided to sacrifice his life in order to kill other people. Just as the officer at Fort Hood decided, on his own, to kill innocent people. The truth is that there’s no real defense against that. Life in a free society involves certain risks. All the armies in the world can’t stop a lone gunman before he fires the first shot. This notion that if we dropped more bombs abroad or tightened immigration standards, we’d somehow be immune from attacks of this kind is a Republican fantasy, one no thinking person believes.

When something like this happens, our response should be simple: deal with it and carry on. Terrorism is a tactic — it’s not defeatable. The best we can do is limit the conditions that breed terrorists while fighting them when and where we must, which is what Obama has done since taking office. Exaggerating every isolated attack into an apocalyptic threat plays perfectly into the enemy’s narrative. Yet that’s exactly what Jindal does. Indeed, he warned that yesterday’s shooting (again, perpetrated by one man) is a reminder that we’re being colonized by Muslims.

 “What’s not acceptable is people that want to come and conquer us. That’s not immigration, by the way, that’s colonization,” Jindal said. This is preposterously stupid on every level. Yes, we’re in a real war. Yes, there are Muslim extremists that want to kill us. And yes, we have to take that seriously. But America isn’t being colonized. Suggesting otherwise is dangerous and needlessly alarmist.

The worst thing we can do, the thing Republicans often do, is blame a single person or party for a terrible and ultimately unavoidable attack. Republicans understand this when it’s the other way around. The logic Jindal uses to pin this attack on Obama applies equally to Bush during 9/11. Indeed, by any measure, the Bush administration was infinitely more responsible for that incident, as it involved dozens of people and months of preparation to which they remained blind. Can you imagine the GOP’s response if a Democratic candidate for president said, the day after 9/11, that it was Bush’s fault, that 3,000 people died because he failed to take terrorism seriously? True or not, they’d have considered that treasonous, at the very least.

Bobbity long ago crossed over into The Donald’s territory… And should be treated a Comedy (as the Donald is by a growing number of News sources) or Political Theater instead of any serious candidate.

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Posted by on July 18, 2015 in Black Conservatives


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Cholera still Claiming Lives in Haiti

Those of you who have followed my blog for a while know that I worked in Haiti for almost two years after the earthquake in 2010. The first morning of the Cholera outbreak in the country I was on my way with a small group of experts to Arbonite to meet with some NGO officials relative to raising funds to build a trauma care Hospital in Port au Prince to replace the dilapidated hospital which had been destroyed in the earthquake. We were also working on the development of a waste processing facility for Port au Prince – as the city of over 3 million has no sewer plant or processing facility, and the open canals which carried sewage to the ocean seemed prime conspirators in the possible eventual emergence of Typhoid and Cholera.

When our little caravan got to the camp we were met by the National Chief of Police, who ordered us to turn back, explaining there had been a Cholera outbreak. This was shocking because the reason François Duvalier, the former Dictator of Haiti was loved by some of the populace and called ‘Papa Doc’ Duvalier, was his work leading to the elimination of 6 diseases from the country, including Cholera. There hadn’t been a case of Cholera in the country to this point in over 50 years, and the government and population believed it eradicated. He walked two of us around to the side of the camp, where we could see the makeshift hospital set up by DWB. They were carrying bodies out the back in a steady stream. He claimed that nearly 2,000 people had died the previous night. Cholera can kill a healthy person in under 12 hours from being infected if untreated.

Cholera is fairly simple to treat, if you have the right materials. Within 24 hours, the NGOs were attempting to fly in “Cholera Kits” – which consist of bags of saline solution to keep the patient hydrated, and an intravenous antibiotic to kill the disease. The disease kills by dehydration. The procedure has about an 85-90% cure rate – if the patient reaches care in time. It was obvious the folks we were supposed to meet were too busy treating the sick for us to meet, so we took the long drive back to the city, to try and help facilitate the logistics of getting the kits into Haiti.

The locals immediately claimed that the source of the disease as a United Nations Military camp upstream from the refugee camp, followed by a series of denials by the UN. It indeed turned out that the source of the disease was the UN Camp, and latrines dug at the shore of the river which leaked into the river. Further, contrary to UN Policy, the soldiers from Nepal had not undergone medical testing for the possibility of carrying the disease.

Once the disease got a start, it fairly rapidly spread, By the end of 2011, when I left the country the medical people were still trying to figure out how it was spreading to seemingly distant and disconnected communities. The lack of sanitation, and pure water certainly has operated to spread the disease, as it can infect thousands when even a single person with the disease comes into a city.

Fresh water is a major problem. In many of the villages they drink from local streams, already polluted by people upstream

After the earthquake billions of dollars in aid were promised to Haiti. Most of that never materialized. The fault of that lies both in the Donor Organizations and Governments, as well as Haiti’s own politicians and Government.

Haiti’s Unstoppable Outbreak

The nation has been battling a cholera epidemic since 2010—and it’s still killing people. Why has no one been able to stop the spread of the disease?

In early February, when Jenniflore Abelard arrived at her parents’ house high in the hills of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, her father Johnson was home. (Some names have been changed to protect the privacy of patients and family members.) He was lying in the yard, under a tree, vomiting. When Jenniflore spoke to him, his responses, between retches, sounded strange: “nasal, like his voice was coming out of his nose.” He talked “like a zombie.” This is a powerful image to use in Haiti, where voodoo is practiced and where the supernatural doesn’t seem as far-fetched as it might elsewhere. Her father’s eyes were sunk back into his head. She was shocked, but she knew what this was, because she has lived through the past five years in Haiti. She has lived through the time of kolera.On October 18, 2010, Cuban medical brigades working in the areas around the town of Mirebalais (note: Mirebalais is located about 30 miles inland from PaP) in Haiti reported a worrying increase in patients with acute, watery diarrhea and vomiting. There had been 61 cases the previous week, and on October 18 alone there were 28 new admissions and two deaths.

 That was the beginning. Five years on, cholera has killed nearly 9,000 Haitians. More than 730,000 people have been infected. It is the worst outbreak of the disease, globally, in modern history. Hundreds of emergency and development workers have been working alongside the Haitian government for five years, trying to rid the country of cholera, and millions of dollars have been dispensed in the fight to eradicate it. But it’s still here. Why?

In 1884, the scientist Robert Koch sent a dispatch from Calcutta to the German Interior Ministry about the bacterium that he had been studying. It was “a little bent, like a comma,” he wrote. He was sure that this organism was causing the cholera that had been ravaging the world since 1817, when it laid waste to Bengal. Its onslaught there was shocking, even for a region that had had cholera—or something similar—for so long that there was a specific cholera goddess, Ola Beebee (translated as “our Lady of the Flux.”)

Ola Beebee was meant to protect against this mysterious affliction, which terrified people. Who would not be scared by seeing “the lips blue, the face haggard, the eyes hollow, the stomach sunk in, the limbs contracted and crumpled as if by fire?” Although 1817 is the official starting date of the first cholera pandemic, humans and cholera have almost certainly coexisted for far longer: That description of cholera’s distinct symptoms was inscribed on a temple in Gujarat, India, over 2,000 years ago.

The world is currently living through the seventh and longest cholera pandemic, which began in Indonesia in 1961 and, before Haiti, was most famous for an outbreak that devastated South America in 1991, killing 12,000 people in 21 countries.People with access to clean water and sanitation probably think of cholera as being as old-fashioned as smallpox, and long gone. Surely the problem now is Ebola? Away from headlines, though, the gram-negative, rod-shaped bacillusVibrio cholerae has been consistently murderous. It is currently present in 58 countries, infecting 3 to 5 million people a year and killing 100,000 to 120,000. This latest pandemic, wrote Edward T. Ryan of Harvard University, “as opposed to burning out after 5 to 20 years as all previous pandemics have done… seems to be picking up speed.”

 On February 11 this year, Johnson ate soup made from yams and bananas bought at the local market. By late afternoon, he was vomiting. With his soup he had swallowed Vibrio cholerae, which usually reach humans through contaminated food or water. Inside his body, the toxin secreted by the cholera bacteria bound to the cells in the wall of his small intestine, causing channels in the cells to stay open. Johnson’s disrupted cells flooded his gut with chloride ions. Sodium ions and water followed, causing his body to expel fluid and electrolytes and passing on more Vibrio bacteria to infect new hosts. A cholera victim can lose several liters of fluid within hours. Cholera can invade the body of a healthy person at daybreak and kill them by sundown.

Johnson is now safe and healthy in Jenniflore’s house, an hour away from his. He survived because he was taken to a nearby cholera-treatment center (CTC) run by Doctors Without Borders (DBW) and because cholera, despite its power, is easy to treat. Eighty percent of cholera cases are cured by the administration of a simple oral rehydration solution…(…more…)

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Posted by on July 12, 2015 in Haiti


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Charter Failure and Corruption

Another conservative failure – privatization of schools.

The Charter “Movement” never was about better education for kids – it is all about lining folks pockets and destroying politically influential teacher’s unions.

So…when is someone going to step in and stop this criminal farce?

The truth about charter schools: Padded cells, corruption, lousy instruction and worse results

Imagine your 5-year-old boy went to a school where he was occasionally thrown in a padded cell and detained alone for stretches as long as 20 minutes.

Or you sent your kid to an elementary school where the children are made to sit on a bare floorin the classroom for days before they can “earn” their desks.

Or your kid went to a school where she spent hours parked in a cubicle in front of a computerwith a poorly trained teacher who has to monitor more than 100 other students.

Maybe you don’t have children or send them to private school? So how do you feel when you find out the local school that you pay for with your taxes is operating a scam that diverted millions of dollars through fake Medicaid billing?

Or the school used your tax dollars as “grants” to start up other profit-making enterprises … orpay lavish salaries – $300,000, $400,000 or more – to its administrators … or support a movement linked to a reclusive Turkish cleric being investigated for bribery and corruption.

Welcome to the world of charter schools.

Are there wonderful charter schools doing great things for kids? Probably. Are all these cumulative anecdotes an unfair representation of the value that charter schools can bring to some communities? Maybe.

But neither of those questions matters because of what the charter school movement has come to represent in the landscape of American education.


Charter schools have been relentlessly marketed to the American populace as a silver bullet for “failed” public schools, especially in poor urban communities of African-American and Latino/a students.

Politicians in both parties speak glowingly of these schools – which, by the way, their children seem never to attend.

Opening charter schools has become the latest fad for celebrities including athletes and rap stars.

Huge nationwide chains – called education management organizations (EMOs) – now run many of these charters. A recent study by the National Education Policy Center found, “Students across 35 states and the District of Columbia now attend schools managed by these non-government entities.” These for-profit and nonprofit EMOs – such as K12 Inc., National Heritage Academies, Charter Schools USA and KIPP – now account for nearly half of the students educated by charter schools.

Substantial, well-funded nationwide organizations have rapidly developed to lobby for these schools. One such organization, the Alliance for School Choice, recently received a $6 million gift from the Walton Foundation, of Wal-Mart fame.

Slick marketing campaigns have been rolled out in communities across the country to tout the coming of new charters.

The actual academic results of these schools seems to hardly anyone, despite report after reportshowing that these schools tend to do poorly on state and national tests and fail at providing equitable education to underserved students.

Yet lobbying for more of these schools continues unabated with more money funneled into the campaigns of politicians who support charters and more efforts to press state lawmakers to lift any provisions currently in place to regulate how these schools operate and are held accountable to the public. Read the rest of this entry »


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Speaker Boehner – “Tea Party Has Lost All Credibility”

The internal battle for the Republican Party heats up. Republican House speaker , John Boehner hammers the Tea Party over their intransigence, and refusal to participate in a functional Government…



Beginning to look like the Adults are taking charge again…


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Tired of Obama Caving…

Been saying this for a long time. Obama’s fixation with bringing Rethuglys on board is a failure.



Posted by on December 11, 2013 in Stupid Democrat Tricks


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