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The “Cops” on Faux (and Backing the Chumph) – Many Have Ethical or Criminal Histories

As I have noted before, a lot of the “cops” who appear on Faux News and other right wing media – themselves have criminal histories.

Paul Babeu, David Clarke and Joe Arpaio on police ta

David Clarke has been accused of covering up a deputy’s misdeeds while Joe Arpaio has been called ‘unrepentantly lawless’. Meet the prominent officers who want the businessman in the Oval Office

As chairman of Donald Trump’s “Florida law enforcement coalition” and one of the Trump campaign’s official pilots, Vincent Caldara is doubly devoted to the Republican presidential nominee and his pledge to crack down on criminality.

A former police officer in New York and Miami, Caldara told supporters at a recent gathering in Florida that he had been flying vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence “from coast to coast to make sure we get the law and order message out to every single person that will be voting on November 8th”.

Caldara is simultaneously fighting claims that he is a lawbreaker himself.

The 55-year-old pilot is charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, after he allegedly drove a vehicle at another person repeatedly in Pompano Beach in July last year. According to court records, the victim, whose name is withheld, was treated in hospital for leg and back injuries. Caldara has pleaded not guilty.

In a separate case, Caldara is accused of severely injuring a woman in June 2014 by recklessly driving into her with his Harley Davidson motorcycle in Fort Lauderdale. The woman is suing Caldara and seeking a jury trial. According to court records, officials have been unable to find Caldara to serve him with a summons.

Caldara and spokespeople for Trump’s campaign did not respond to several requests for comment.

The accusations of wrongdoing against Caldara are only the latest in an eclectic series of claims leveled at law enforcement figures who have publicly endorsed Trump’s campaign for the White House.

Amid a spike in crime in some US cities, Trump on Friday received the endorsement of the national Fraternal Order of Police union, whose president, Chuck Canterbury, said: “Our members believe he will make America safe again”.

But dark spots on the records of some of Trump’s most prominent police backers challenge the credibility of his claim to be the “law and order candidate”. In July, a coalition of dozens of police chiefs and prosecutors pleaded with the Republican nominee to abandon his draconian ideas and embrace contemporary policing theory and criminal justice reform.

Here, the Guardian reviews some of the allegations made against a half-dozen lawmen who have lent their support to Trump’s presidential campaign:

David Clarke

Sheriff David Clarke of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, has been Trump’s most visible ally among serving police. Although a registered Democrat, Clarke, 60, accused Hillary Clinton’s campaign of “embracing criminality” after mothers of African Americans killed by police appeared onstage at the Democratic National Convention.

Clarke.

But Clarke has been accused of violating rules and regulations himself since being elected in 2002. After one of his deputies broke a woman’s neck by crashing his vehicle into her car, Clarke was alleged to have overseen an attempted cover-up that involved framing the woman for drunk driving.

The victim, Tanya Weyker, sued Clarke, several deputies and county authorities in state and federal court in 2014 for compensation and civil rights violations. She said Clarke and his officers continued pursuing charges against her for months even after they knew video evidence showed the officer was at fault.

“Clarke was personally involved in the conspiracy to continue with the baseless prosecution of [Weyker],” the federal lawsuit said, “or, at the very least, was deliberately and recklessly indifferent to his subordinates’ unconstitutional actions and related misconduct.” Clarke and the officers denied the allegations.

An attorney for Weyker, Drew DeVinney, said Weyker settled her state lawsuit for the state-capped maximum $250,000 in compensation, and then settled the federal lawsuit for more than $95,000 for civil rights violations and attorneys’ fees.

Clarke has also come under criticism from within his own ranks. In 2010, deputy Richard Graber, a senior official in the Milwaukee deputies’ union, alleged that Clarke aggressively confronted him, called him a “sick fuck” and threatened to “come after him” for questioning an order that deputies must work mandatory overtime after the high-profile death of a local child.

“Clarke’s profanity-ridden rant included yelling, pointing, and calling Graber ‘waste,’ an ‘organizational terrorist,’ a ‘fucker,’ and a ‘cancer to the agency’,” according to an appeals court filing. Clarke denied most of Graber’s account of their confrontation. A federal appeals court said Clarke’s behavior amounted to an “adverse employment action” but rejected an allegation from Graber that the mistreatment was because of his union activity.

Inspector Edward Bailey, a spokesman for Clarke, declined to comment. “This county office does not involve itself in the current presidential race in any capacity,” he said in an email.

Paul Babeu

Sheriff Paul Babeu of Pinal County, Arizona, enthusiastically supports Trump’s anti-immigration stance and campaign pledge to build a wall along the US border with Mexico. Babeu is also running as a Republican for a seat in the US House of Representatives and has made border security a key plank of his campaign.

Babeu promises voters on his website that he will tackle the “hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants pouring across our southern borders”, warning that at present, “possible terrorists with military training, deliberate plans and lots of money can cross the border”.

In 2012, Jose Orozco, a Mexican man and ex-boyfriend of Babeu who worked for the sheriff’s election campaign, alleged that he was threatened with deportation by an aide to Babeu when he refused to sign an agreement not to publicly disclose the relationship. Orozco’s attorney said she was told Orozco’s US visa had expired, making him undocumented. Babeu denied Orozco’s allegations. An inquiry by the Arizona attorney general concluded that he committed no criminal violation.

Babeu.

Babeu has also faced allegations made public by his sisterthat as headmaster and executive director of a boarding school for troubled teenagers in Massachusetts, he had a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old student. Babeu, who led the controversial DeSisto School in West Stockbridge between 1999 and 2001, responded by publishing his sister’s mental health history.

The former student, Joshua Geyer, has not disputed that he had a relationship with Babeu, but insisted that it was not “inappropriate”. This week, a spokesman for Babeu sent the Guardian a letter purportedly from Geyer that said he and Babeu had no sexual relationship at all. Asked twice whether Babeu himself denied that the relationship took place, the spokesman did not respond.

State authorities pursued DeSisto for operating illegally without a state license. Over the years, the school became notorious for its severe punishment system, and was investigated repeatedly for allegations of abuse and mistreatment of students. It has since closed.

The Babeu spokesman, Barrett Marson, said in an email: “Paul was in charge of the business operations at the school. He never had any control over student discipline or instruction. He was in charge of ensuring there was food and bathroom supplies and things like that. But Paul was never investigated nor had any knowledge of any alleged abuse at the school while he was employed there.”…More Here

 

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Black Voter Suppression Law in North Carolina Tossed By Supreme Court

Thank you Justice Scalia for dying. At least if not soon enough, at least in my lifetime.

Image result for voter suppression

Supreme Court Denies North Carolina’s Plea To Restore Swath Of Voting Restrictions

The state won’t be able to enforce them come Election Day.

The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a last-ditch request from North Carolina to reinstate a controversial set of voting restrictions that would have taken effect in the lead-up to the November election.

In a one-sentence order that did not include any reasoning, the high court declined the state’s petition, which sought to put on hold a July ruling that found the voting law discriminated against African-Americans and compared it to a relic of the Jim Crow era.

The state failed to convince at least five justices that three provisions of the contested law ― its voter ID requirement, cutbacks to early voting and elimination of pre-registration for certain under-18 voters ― were worth putting back on the books. The state had argued the measures were necessary to avoid “confusion” that might keep people away from the polls.

But three justices ― Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Anthony Kennedy and Samuel Alito ― did note that they would’ve granted the state’s request, at least with respect to voter ID and early voting. Justice Clarence Thomas, for his part, would’ve granted North Carolina’s petition in full.

In essence, this means the Supreme Court voted 4-to-4 in the dispute, with Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan swinging against the state. A ninth conservative member in the mold of the late Justice Antonin Scalia might have given North Carolina a key victory.

In legal filings, Civil rights groups had countered that the state’s own prior assurances in court plus “on-the-ground activity” by election officials ― including preparations at the county level to comply with the July ruling ― flew in the face of the state’s insistence that there was not enough time to get things in order for Election Day.Image result for voter suppression

“Now, almost a month after the Fourth Circuit’s ruling, State and local elections officials have taken nearly all of the steps to comply with that ruling,” the voting rights groups said in a brief opposing North Carolina’s request.

The Obama administration, which in 2013 suffered a big loss when the Supreme Court did away with a key section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, filed its own brief urging the justices to deny the state’s plea, and to not read too much into arguments in favor of a law that was properly found to be discriminatory.

The Supreme Court’s move is a significant setback for Gov. Pat McCrory (R), who had defended the law’s voter ID requirement as “common sense” and vowed to seek emergency relief from the high court soon after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit struck it down.

But McCrory didn’t follow through on his promise: It took the state 17 days to ask the Supreme Court to inspect the ruling ― a delay that may have played a role in the court’s action on Wednesday.

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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Steal From the Best – The Chumph’s Wife Steal Speech From Michelle Obama!

If you are going to be a thief – go after the Role and not the Timex…

Controversy erupted over the Chump’s wife, Melanoma stealing parts of her convention speech from Michelle Obama’s 2008 address of the Democratic Convention. Failing to have any Republican women whose speeches were worth stealing from – she went for the Gold Standard.

Melania Trump’s plagiarism has exploded into a ‘save my marriage’ crisis: NBC reporter

Sources from the Donald Trump campaign told NBC News reporter Katy Tur that there is an uproar over accusations that Melania Trump’s much-anticipated speech on Monday night was plagiarized from a speech by First Lady Michelle Obama in 2008.

The Trump camp has been scrambling to explain similarities between the two speeches, going so far as to blame Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Tur, who has been covering the Trump campaign, said that Melania didn’t want to do the speech in the first place, but in the end was brought on board to try and humanize the bombastic candidate.

“Well this morning I’m told that she didn’t necessarily want to do this, and that the campaign basically had to put their best person to help her with the speech,” Tur reported. “They were putting somebody from the staff with all of the family members because this is obviously a big deal, the convention, it’s not unusual to have a staff member help write a convention speech.”

Tur said that Trump staffers were hoping Melania would “outshine everybody” and immediately after the speech, she was praised for her performance. But shortly after, striking similarities between Obama’s 2008 speech were raised and people began mocking it online…

 

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Black Conservative Has Had Enough of Trump Racism

My…My…My… This black conservative, Republican strategist Tara Setmayer absolutely rips Chumph apologist and racist Jeffry Lord a new one!

When I heard this sheriff’s star nonsense yesterday, that this was the excuse, I looked at my husband – who is a federal law enforcement officer, by the way, who was very offended by the implication that a sheriff’s star was what this was instead of the Star of David – the first thing he said when he looked at that was, ‘A sheriff’s star has points on it,’” she said. “This is one of the nonsense excuses that this campaign is using to make up for their incompetence and the fact that they are running an amateur hour presidential campaign.”

Setmayer went on to say that she could excuse this sort of thing if it were the first time Trump had posted a horrendously offensive meme that was created by white supremacists, but in reality he’s now done this on multiple occasions.

“But this is not the first, second, third or fourth time that Donald Trump has gotten in trouble for retweeting things from white supremacists,” she said.

 

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BLM and the Political Conventions

This article believes that BLM will be the driving counter-force at both conventions. I believe it is wrong…

I believe what we are going to see this election season, particularly at the Republican Convention is the emergence of Hispanics as a powerful demographic, and political voice.

And if Hispanics carry through with that threat, and actually get the sort of turnout that black folks have traditionally had – then the Chumph, and the Republican Party is going to learn just how bad it is to have pissed off both major minority groups in the US. Since Hispanic turnout is traditionally low (around 40%), up until now, using Hispanics as whipping boys for the right really hasn’t cost Republican anything. Arturo Vargas, executive director of the National Association of Elected and Appointed Officials, projects 13.1 million Hispanics will vote nationwide in 2016, compared to 11.2 million in 2012 and 9.7 million in 2008.

The Black Lives Matter Movement’s Political Moment

The party conventions provide an opportunity for protesters to reassert themselves on a national stage.

Political conventions have always attracted political protests, and the history of black organizers protesting at major party conventions stretches back decades. Mass protests led by the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, then-Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee leader and current Representative John Lewis, and activist Fannie Lou Hamer at the 1964 Democratic Convention helped bring the Voting Rights Act of 1965 into existence and hasten the exit of white conservatives from the Democratic Party. The 1968 Democratic Convention was upended by mass protests and riots from a collection of counterculture and civil rights groups, including anti-war demonstrators, black nationalists, and the nonviolent remnants of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign. The surveillance, protests, and a political plot at this convention captured the fraught racial climate of the United States in the wake of King’s death and the ensuing riots.

With the 2016 Democratic and Republican conventions approaching, America’s mood is perhaps not quite as tense as it was after the anti-black violence of the 1964 Freedom Summer or the fear and destruction of the 1968 King riots. But it is still characterized in part by anger from black activists. Donald Trump’s campaign has fomented protests from black organizers across the country, and his racist posturing has led to renewed calls for protests against the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Black Lives Matter, a movement that dominated headlines last year in protests against police violence, has always been political, but the conventions provide much more direct avenue to electoral politics. Black activism could be a major force in shaping or disrupting the agendas of both parties.

Will the Democrats’ gathering in Philadelphia look anything like its 1964 or 1968 predecessors? Prominent activist and member of Campaign ZERO DeRay Mckesson stated that he expects organizing in Philadelphia to reflect young black disillusionment over Clinton’s candidacy and the Democratic platform, as well as the precedent set by a recent sit-in in Congress led by Lewis. Philadelphia activists affiliated with Black Lives Matter have confirmed their intent. Erica Mines of the Philadelphia Coalition for REAL Justice—known for challenging Bill Clinton about his crime bill at a rally in April—says her group and other black activists in the area will have a presence at the convention in late July. “We definitely plan on having a protest,” Mines told me…

…But will that same spirit of protest also spur black activists at the Republican Convention in Cleveland? The people planning it certainly think so. Planners in Cleveland have used much of the $50 million event grant from Congress on surveillance of black protesters and have purchased a Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) for use in crowd control. The original anti-protest rules for the Cleveland convention were so strict that liberal and conservative grassroots joined forces to defeat them in court. But Cleveland-area groups affiliated with Black Lives Matter would not go on the record about any specific plans.

Their reticence to go on record reflects a fear of surveillance among black organizers. After numerous protests in Cleveland in 2015, FBI officials intimatedthat they were closely surveilling the city’s activists. The Secret Service has also rolled out a muscular intelligence apparatus in Cleveland in advance of the convention. While most of their efforts are dedicated to addressing threats of terrorism, law-enforcement officials are also monitoring the social-media activity of Black Lives Matter activists.

Despite the increased security, black protesters will almost surely show up. Cleveland became a center of black organizing against police brutality after police killed Tamir Rice in 2014. The city has also been the target of a Justice Department probe into police brutality. The first major Black Lives Matter conference was held in Cleveland last year, marred by an incident in which a transit officer pepper-sprayed demonstrators.

Not all black protesters who show up in Cleveland or Philadelphia will be working for the same exact goals. Shanelle Matthews, the director of communications for the Black Lives Matter network, said the organization does not publicize direct action in advance, and the conventions do not have a blanket significance nationally. “Because we’re decentralized and all of the chapters work autonomously, to each of the chapters in their regions [conventions] mean something different,” Matthews said. Some chapters or affiliates that choose to protest might focus on police violence. Others may focus on economic justice. Still others may focus on environmental justice.

This is a critical summer for Black Lives Matter as an organization and a broader movement—as Matthews notes, it is “still in its infancy.” Local activists are seeking to build their advocacy networks and figure out what causes and methods make sense for them. Both conventions will provide opportunities for black activists to make their mark on electoral politics, if they are so inclined. “I think this is a time for us as black and brown people in this country to really understand what it means to be part of the democratic process,” Mines told me. “It is a pivotal time for us especially for the DNC and Philadelphia historically. Understanding this is the birthplace of democracy and this is a once in a lifetime thing, we have to get our issues addressed.”

While these activists will undoubtedly draw from the legacies of 1964 and 1968, the thoroughly decentralized, intersectional Black Lives Matter movement may well add something new to the history of protests and conventions. After months of being overshadowed by the election, black protesters will likely make headlines again in July.

 

 

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The Trump Family Reunion Convention

The Trump coronation convention i turning into an all-Chumph affair. Unlike normal Party Conventions, the major players and former Presidents in the Republican Party have headed for the hills and will not be in attendance. Moving down to the elected Senators and Congressmen isn’t producing much of a turnout either.

Earlier this week, the Chumph announced he had booked Mike Tyson, and Mike Ditka (former Bears Football Coach)… Nope…and Hell Nope!

The Speakers for this years Republican Convention…Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, and Chumph (3 times!)

Trump looks to unlikely speakers for convention help

Donald Trump is turning to his family, sports figures and business leaders to fill speaking slots at the Republican National Convention later this month as scores of prominent Republican leaders continue to refuse to line up behind their controversial nominee-to-be.

Trump announced Friday that his wife and children “are all going to be speaking” at the nominating convention that kicks off in just over two weeks. And the real estate mogul has also promised to add sports figures and other non-politicians who are supporting him to the roster of convention speakers, which would set the 2016 convention apart from past conventions packed with current and former elected officials.
The unconventional programming, which Trump has said will include a “winners’ night,” comes as his campaign and the Republican National Committee are facing an unusual problem unseen in past conventions: a lack of interest in speaking slots from many party elders and rising stars.
Instead of bartering with former primary rivals and the next generation of party leaders jostling for prominent placement in the convention programming, Trump is left watching idly as prominent Republicans tell reporters they have no interest in speaking at the convention or, in some cases, even just attending.
“Everybody normally wants to speak at the convention,” said Stuart Stevens, chief strategist to Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential bid who was involved in organizing that year’s convention.
A bevy of senators, prominent congressmen and governors have stated that they won’t attend the convention, refusals that are particularly pronounced among those facing tight re-election battles in battleground states.
The past two GOP nominees, Romney and Sen. John McCain of Arizona, have also said they won’t attend the convention in Cleveland. And several of Trump’s GOP rivals, including the host state’s governor, John Kasich, also won’t take the stage at the convention.
“Trump is the most unpopular politician on the national scene. So the idea that a lot of people aren’t dying to appear with him shouldn’t be a shock,” Stevens said, pointing to Trump’s sky-high unfavorable numbers, which have hovered around 60% in the latest polls.
Trump tweeted Saturday morning that there was no shortage of speakers for the convention and that he would soon reveal their names.
 
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Posted by on July 2, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Speaking Falsehood to Race, and Touting It as “Telling it Like it Is”

Lot of racism passing for “truth” out there on the right…

When ‘telling it like it is’ exposes ‘lazy’ thinking about blacks

I’ve really struggled with how to write about the results of two polls on race released this week. So, let me just toss out the two findings that have induced this paralysis.

According to the Reuters-Ipsos poll, “Supporters of U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump are more likely to describe African Americans as ‘criminal,’ ‘unintelligent,’ ‘lazy’ and ‘violent’ than voters who backed some Republican rivals in the primaries or who support Democratic contender Hillary Clinton.”

According to the Pew Research Center’s survey on race, “About six-in-ten (59%) white Republicans say too much attention is paid to race and racial issues these days, while only 21% of Democrats agree.”

That folks harbor anti-black views is nothing new. An Associated Press pollfrom 2012 showed that negative views of African Americans jumped from 48 percent in 2008 to 51 percent in 2012. And that number jumped to 56 percent when implicit racial attitudes were factored in. But the Reuters-Ipsos poll still shocks the conscience.

 

Trump’s supporters are overwhelmingly white. Many of them proudly say he won them over by “telling it like it is” and “not being politically correct” with his racist, xenophobic and nativist presidential campaign. So, I’m hardly surprised that the followers of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee lead the pack in thinking that African Americans are “less ‘intelligent’ than whites” (32 percent), “more ‘lazy’ than whites” (40 percent), “more ‘violent’ than whites (nearly 50 percent) and “more ‘criminal’ than whites (nearly 50 percent).

That’s why I cocked an eyebrow when I read some of the results of the Pew poll. That 59 percent of Republicans think too much attention is paid to race or racial issues is as absurd as it is willful blindness to their contribution to the nation’s race problem. And the consequences of the attitudes expressed in the Reuters-Ipsos poll are revealed in the Pew poll.

The graphic says it all: “About half of blacks say they’ve been treated like they were suspicious or not smart.” Forty-seven (47) percent of African Americans said in the last 12 months “people acted as if they were suspicious of [them].” Two percentage points fewer (45 percent) said “people acted as if they thought [the respondent] weren’t smart.”

Now, I don’t need no stinkin’ polls to tell me what I know from my personal experience. Still, it stings when you see how little folks think of you and your people and how that manifests itself in harmful ways.

 
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Posted by on July 1, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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