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Sen. Cory Booker Under Protective Detail After Assasination Threat

White wingers…Again.

Corey Booker (l) and Va Senator Doug Jones

Sen. Cory Booker Gets Extra Security Following Death Threat

Police have beefed up security at the senator’s residence in Newark, New Jersey.

Police in Newark, New Jersey, were providing increased protection to Sen. Cory Booker(D-N.J.) after the lawmaker and his family received a death threat.

Newark police were notified by U.S. Capitol Police “regarding a threat on the life” of Booker and his family members, the city’s mayor, Ras Baraka, said on Saturday in a statement. “As a result, members of the Police Division’s Executive Protection Unit have been assigned to provide security at the Senator’s residence in Newark,” the mayor said, according to ABC News.

Baraka did not elaborate on the threat.

Booker was recently in Alabama for the special Senate election that pitted Republican Roy Moore against Democrat Doug Jones. Booker, who’d canvassed for Jones, celebrated the Democrat’s surprising victory last week.

Booker, one of President Donald Trump’s most vociferous critics in Congress, has in recent days blasted the Federal Communications Commission decision to repeal net neutrality, slammed what he called Trump’s “all-out assault on the LGBTQ community,” and called for the president to resign over accusations of sexual harassment.

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Official Pizza of the White Supremacists

Papa John’s CEO John Schnatter has certainly gotten his company in a mess of this one. The picture below is a fake. It is a photoshop put out by the neo-Nazis.

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Consumer boycotts have become an effective way for us “little people” to punish egregious behavior by some corporations. A Marketer’s worst nightmare is to have their company identified with anything that destroys or harms their brand. It is bad enough when an employee does something stupid, but at least the company can take corrective action through punishing or firing the employee and distancing the company from bad actions.

With the Trump era comes a new problem. Undesirable or reprehensible groups associating their name and causes with corporate brands. Most recently, Papa John’s Pizza becoming the Pizza supplier of the alt-right and neo-Nazis. Now to be honest, the company’s association with these reprehensible groups isn’t entirely unearned. CEO John Schnatter’s foray into politics aligned with the right, has led some rather nasty groups to believe he is aligned with them. Schnatter’s outspoken opposition to the ACA, and later jumping in on the wrong side of the NFL Player protest controversy certainly didn’t earn his company, or personal image and friends.

Membership with the far-right extremists isn’t based on necessarily supporting their odious beliefs, it is often based simply on the idea that a certain person or group is “sticking it to the liberals”.

That has resulted in a 13% drop in stock price.

Now I have no idea of Mr. Schnatter’s beliefs. I would reject calling him a racist on the positions he has taken, however his company is being hammered by “guilt by association” even though there is little to no evidence that the company in any way attempted to support or to encourage that association. Mr. Schnatter certainly is a Republican. and demonstratively supports some of the right’s “politics of race”. That is a pretty broad range of folks, and groups which have vastly different views and agendas.

Yeah, John Schnatter -it’s unfair. But you really should have seen the sharks in that cesspool before you stuck your foot in. Politics always leads to “association”, quite often with fringe groups seeking validation, or some folks making bad assumptions. Which is why smart companies are very careful about what their brand gets attached to.

What happens when Nazis hijack your brand

The neo-Nazis were hungry. They’d spent the day in a Charlottesville courthouse testifying at the preliminary hearing of a white nationalist jailed for pepper spraying counter protesters during August’s deadly Unite the Right rally. Now, after the long drive home to Alexandria, Va., they craved pizza.

“We were going to order from the local place where we get pizza all the time, but we said no, Papa John’s is the official pizza of the alt-right now,” said Eli Mosley, the 26-year-old leader of the white separatist group Identity Evropa. “We’re just supporting the brands that support us.”

That show of support — unsolicited and unwanted by Papa John’s which Tuesday posted a tweet explicitly rejecting neo-Nazi ideas — exhibits an emerging danger to major American brands negotiating the racial politics that have cleaved the country.

It is no longer enough for companies to keep a low profile when it comes to polarizing issues involving race, brand experts say. Instead, some companiesare preemptively stating their positions, hoping to avoid being hijacked by white supremacists eager to spread their ideas into the mainstream by tying themselves to household brands, from pizzas and burgers to sneakers and cars.

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“Companies need to take a public stand on issues that are affecting consumers in advance of being co-opted,” said Heide Gardner, chief diversity and inclusion officer at IPG, one of the world’s largest advertising and marketing conglomerates. “Brands need to build a certain level of sophistication around racial issues. They need to be really mindful of how charged the environment is and take pains to look at situations through a diversity lens.”

Papa John’s learned this lesson the hard way after the chain, a major NFL sponsor, found itself in the unwelcome embrace of neo-Nazi groups following a Nov. 1 call with investors that blamed disappointing pizza sales on football players’ protests against racism and police brutality.

Following the call, a neo-Nazi website hailed Papa John’s as “Seig Heil Pizza” with a photo of a pie whose pepperonis had been arranged into a swastika.

It didn’t matter that the company immediately condemned racism and all hate groups in a statement saying, “We do not want these individuals or groups to buy our pizza.”

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“They can signal all they want but we know,” said Mosley, praising the chief executive’s statements.

The neo-Nazis’ campaign to co-opt brands has forced companies into a familiar pattern: corporate statements disavowing white supremacy, typically followed by silence, in hopes the controversy would blow over without long-lasting damage to their image and sales.

But that approach did not work for Papa John’s, whose stock had fallen by 13 percent since the earnings call by close of business Tuesday.

That night, in a renewed attempt to disown the neo-Nazis that have attached themselves to the brand, Papa John’s tweeted an emoji of a middle finger to “those guys.” The company also apologized for CEO John Schnatter’s “divisive” comments on the earnings call and affirmed its support for NFL players protesting inequality.

“We will work with the players and league to find a positive way forward,” the company tweeted. “Open to ideas from all. Except neo-Nazis.”

A spokesman told the Post Wednesday that they wanted to be “crystal clear” about where the company stood with regard to white supremacist groups.

Other companies should take heed of Papa John’s experience, experts say. As the marketplace becomes the latest battleground for the culture wars, brand strategists are advising companies accustomed to staying out of the political fray to proactively weigh in with bold statements about race — such as Nikeand Ben & Jerry’s have done — to thwart future attempts by hate groups to adopt brands as their own.

More brands, now on edge, are also building up their crisis management teams in preparation for the next racial flare up, said Tiffany Warren, chief diversity officer at Omnicom Group, a global marketing and corporate communications holding company.

“That’s the new reality,” Warren said. “It’s not just nice to have. It’s the way of doing business now.”

Some companies were just bystanders when they were swept up in the racially charged atmosphere.

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Tiki Brand, owned by Wisconsin-based Lamplight Farms Incorporated, was simply minding its business as a purveyor of Polynesian kitsch, when its bamboo torches were used by white nationalist protesters in Charlottesville.

Images of angry young white men parading through the University of Virginia campus holding the flaming torches aloft turned the product once evocative of backyard barbecues and luaus into a symbol of white supremacy.

The company declined to comment on whether it has felt any financial impact from its tarnished image.

Other companies caught the admiration of neo-Nazis after their executives voiced support for President Trump or his policies.

Pottsville, Pa.’s Yuengling, touted as “America’s oldest brewery,” became the favored beer of white nationalists after the company’s owner backed Trump in the final days of the campaign.

Andrew Anglin, founder of the Daily Stormer website, declared New Balance the “official shoes of white people” after an executive of the Boston shoe company praised Trump’s stance on trade soon after he was elected. Liberals tweeted pictures of themselves trashing or burning their New Balance sneakers.

Still other firms attracted the attention of white nationalists through branding mistakes of their own. Anglin proclaimed Wendy’s the “official burger of the neo-Nazi alt-right movement” after the fast food restaurant mistakenly tweeted a picture of Pepe the Frog, the white nationalist symbol, in the same red pigtails as the Wendy’s girl mascot.

And white supremacists celebrated when a casting call for a Cadillac commercial sought “any and all real alt-right thinkers/believers.” Cadillac said at the time it did not authorize the casting notice, but Anglin had already pounced, writing in a post titled “Yes, We are Mainstream Now” that “it was natural for a major American corporation to want someone from our movement.”…

 

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Oh! The crime! Racist Former Whites Only House Official and Chicago

In 2016 there were 762 homicides in Chicago the murder rate is 17.52 per 100,000. That means that .01752% of Chicago’s population is murdered each year.

Chicago does not have the highest murder rate in the country – it is actually 25th.

In 2016 the Cop Suicide rate was 29.4, the highest in the country.  That means that .0294% of all Chicago Cops commit suicide in 2016.

Chicago has the highest suicide rate.

One in six high school students in Chicago (15.8 percent) have attempted suicide in the past 12 months, according to a Youth Risk Behavior report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — the highest rate of 21 urban school districts surveyed. The suicide attempt rate in Chicago is 15,800 per 100,000 kids!

The suicide rate in America is 3 times higher than the homicide rate.

The drug overdose death rate is nearly 4 time higher than the homicide rate.

So why are these racist mofos so traumatized by Chicago’s homicide rate?

Black people accounted for little more than 8 percent, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data of Opioid overdose deaths. Meaning white folks are overrepresented in the number of Opioid Deaths.

White (especially men) also are overrepresented in Suicide rates.

What impact does race have on the incidence of ?

 

An article in The New York Times analyzed nearly 60 million death certificates collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1999 to 2014. The analysis revealed that:

  • In 2014, the overdose death rate for whites ages 25 to 35 was five times its level in 1999, while
  • The rate tripled for whites ages 35-44 during that same period.
  • The rates of overdose deaths for black adults in those same age cohorts only edged up slightly, however.

 

The coverup? Right here from the whites only white supremacist cabal.

 

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The Chumph’s Private Thugs

Organized Chumph Thugs

Charlottesville violence

Racist, Violent, Unpunished: A White Hate Group’s Campaign of Menace

They train to fight. They post their beatings online. And so far, they have little reason to fear the authorities.

It was about 10 a.m. on Aug. 12 when the melee erupted just north of Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Virginia.

About two dozen white supremacists—many equipped with helmets and wooden shields—were battling with a handful of counter-protesters, most of them African American. One white man dove into the violence with particular zeal. Using his fists and feet, the man attacked one person after another.

The street fighter was in Virginia on that August morning for the “Unite the Right” rally, the largest public gathering of white supremacists in a generation, a chaotic and bloody event that would culminate, a few hours later, in the killing of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, who was there to protest the racist rally.

The violence in Charlottesville became national news. President Donald Trump’s response to it—he asserted there were “some very fine people on both sides” of the events that day—set off a wave of condemnations, from his allies as well as his critics.

But for many Americans, conservatives as well as liberals, there was shock and confusion at the sight of bands of white men bearing torches, chanting racist slogans and embracing the heroes of the Confederacy: Who were they? What are their numbers and aims?

There is, of course, no single answer. Some who were there that weekend in Charlottesville are hardened racists involved with long-running organizations like the League of the South. Many are fresh converts to white supremacist organizing, young people attracted to nativist and anti-Muslim ideas circulated on social media by leaders of the so-called alt-right, the newest branch of the white power movement. Some are paranoid characters thrilled to traffic in the symbols and coded language of vast global conspiracy theories. Others are sophisticated provocateurs who see the current political moment as a chance to push a “white agenda,” with angry positions on immigration, diversity and economic isolationism.

ProPublica spent weeks examining one distinctive group at the center of the violence in Charlottesville: an organization called the Rise Above Movement, one of whose members was the white man dispensing beatings near Emancipation Park Aug. 12.

The group, based in Southern California, claims more than 50 members and a singular purpose: physically attacking its ideological foes. RAM’s members spend weekends training in boxing and other martial arts, and they have boasted publicly of their violence during protests in Huntington Beach, San Bernardino and Berkeley. Many of the altercations have been captured on video, and its members are not hard to spot.

Indeed, ProPublica has identified the group’s core members and interviewed one of its leaders at length. The man in the Charlottesville attacks—filmed by a documentary crew working with ProPublica—is 24-year-old Ben Daley, who runs a Southern California tree-trimming business.

Many of the organization’s core members, including Daley, have serious criminal histories, according to interviews and a review of court records. Before joining RAM, several members spent time in jail or state prison on serious felony charges including assault, robbery, and gun and knife offenses. Daley did seven days in jail for carrying a concealed snub-nosed revolver. Another RAM member served a prison term for stabbing a Latino man five times in a 2009 gang assault.

“Fundamentally, RAM operates like an alt-right street-fighting club,” said Oren Segal, director of the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism.

Despite their prior records, and open boasting of current violence, RAM has seemingly drawn little notice from law enforcement. Four episodes of violence documented by ProPublica resulted in only a single arrest—and in that case prosecutors declined to go forward. Law enforcement officials in the four cities—Charlottesville, Huntington Beach, San Bernardino and Berkeley—either would not comment about RAM or said they had too little evidence or too few resources to seriously investigate the group’s members.

In Virginia, two months after the deadly events in Charlottesville, Corinne Geller, a spokeswoman for the Virginia State Police, would not say if the police had identified RAM as a dangerous group.

“We’re not going to be releasing the names of the groups that we believe were present that day in Charlottesville,” she said. Investigators, she added, are still “reviewing footage” from the event.

Law enforcement has a mixed record when it comes to anticipating and confronting the challenge of white supremacist violence.

Often working undercover at great personal risk, federal investigators have successfully disrupted dozens of racist terror attacks. In the last year, agents have captured three Kansas men planning to bomb a mosque and an apartment complex inhabited largely by Somali immigrants, arrested a white supremacist in South Carolina as he plotted a “big scale” attack, and investigated a neo-Nazi cell that allegedly intended to blow up a nuclear power plant.

But there have also been failures. During the past five years, white supremacists, some of them members of gangs or organized political groups, have murdered at least 22 people, according to the Global Terrorism Database and news reports. And some government insiders say the intelligence services and federal law enforcement agencies have largely shifted their attention away from far-right threats in the years since 9/11, choosing instead to focus heavily on Islamic radicals, who are seen by some to pose a more immediate danger.

State and local police have struggled to respond effectively to the recent resurgence in racist political organizing. Police in Sacramento were caught unprepared in June 2016 when neo-Nazis and anti-fascist counter-protesters, or “antifa,” armed with knives and improvised weapons, clashed outside the California State Capitol during a rally. Ten people were sent to the hospital with stab wounds….more

 

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The American-American Arms Race

Up until the Chumph, walking around with guns at protest marches was almost exclusively the purview of white wingers. Unable to win an argument based either or the truth of their claims, or their ability to converse intelligently,, the right-white fell back into the KKK history and decided to tout guns at rallies to threaten “evil liberals” who always seemed to win an “argument”.

Portions of the white-right have always been synonymous with violence. Whether the KKK, white nationalist, neo-Nazi, or even some Militia groups – they have left a bloody path wherever they go across America.

Now that they have the full support of the Chumph and his racist lackey Jefferson Davis Sessions, they are emboldened, and the number of hate crimes, and level of domestic terrorism has risen exponentially. By trying to drive a wedge between legitimate Law Enforcement and brutal goons who murder and assault at will, the Chump has created a situation where the citizenry is les sure that the Police will actually be on the side of Law and Order. I think in all but a few areas of the country, that fear is a bit overblown.

However, the white right is spoiling for a fight -as seen with both the murder in Charlottesville, and the attempted murders in Gainesville a few days ago,

This does not bode well.

Left Wing Militia set to defend their communities…Because the Chumph and KKK Sessions won’t

Left-wing groups taking up guns in ‘arms race’ against Trump-backing right-wingers

Left-wing activists are taking up arms in response to increasingly bold actions by white supremacists and other right-wing extremists.

Membership in left-leaning gun groups has jumped under President Donald Trump, just as militia membership dramatically rose during his predecessor’s presidency, reported the New York Daily News.

The National African-American Gun Association added 500 new members within two days after a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville left a counter-protester dead, and the group went from four chapters to 45 in the past year.

The national Liberal Gun Club has roughly doubled its paid membership since the election, to about 5,500, and the LGBTQ-oriented Pink Pistols groups also added members.

“It’s a way to assert our strength,” said Jake Allen, 27, who helped form the Pink Pistols. “Often, queer people are thought of as being weak, as being defenseless, and I think in many ways this pushes back against that, and I want white supremacists and neo-Nazis to know that queer people are taking steps necessary to protect themselves.”

Mark Bray, author of “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook” and a visiting scholar at Dartmouth College, said leftists had gained a new perspective since Occupy Wall Street, and he said Trump’s election had emboldened right-wing hate groups.

“Back (during Occupy demonstrations) we were sitting in parks, twinkling our fingers and talking about economic inequality,” Bray said. “Now we’re talking about firearms and self-defense.”

Anti-fascist radicals, including the armed Redneck Revolt group, have clashed with right-wing extremists at public demonstrations around the country, but the trend away from nonviolent protest has worried some veteran activists.

“Is an arms race what we really want?” asked Scott Fearing, executive director of Rochester’s Out Alliance. “What we know in any arms race is that it’s never good for anybody, and death and destruction and harm and hurt can come when so many people have arms and weapons.”

 

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3 of the Chumph’s “Good People” Arrested For Attempted Murder After Florida Speech

About those “Good people on both sides”…

Charlottesville and now Florida – White Supremacist rally – attempted murder by white supremacists.

This is what the Chumph encourages every single day.

Three of the CHumph’s white supremacist “Good People” attempted murderers

These Are The Three Richard Spencer Fans Arrested For Attempted Homicide In Gainesville

They are all active white supremacists; two of them are violent felons.

About five hours before his companion allegedly fired a bullet toward several protesters, and a day before police charged him with attempted homicide, Colton Fears, in an interview with HuffPost, laid out the grievances that had brought him to town. “Basically, I’m just fed up with the fact that I’m cis-gendered, I’m a white male, and I lean right, towards the Republican side,” said Fears, 28, wearing a pin of the 3rd SS Panzer Division Totenkopf of the Waffen-SS. “And I get demonized if I don’t accept certain things.”

According to the Anti-Defamation League, Colton Fears is the “least active” of the three Texas men charged in Thursday’s shooting, which happened after Richard Spencer’s speech at the University of Florida. Fears’ brother, William, 30, and Tyler Tenbrink, 28, were also charged. It was Tenbrink who allegedly jumped out of a silver Jeep after an argument with protesters and produced a handgun. “I’m going to fucking kill you,” Tenbrink reportedly yelled at the protesters, while the Fears brothers encouraged him to shoot.

Tenbrink popped off a single round that missed his targets and hit a building behind them, then got back in the Jeep and fled. One of the victims reported the Jeep’s vehicle tag number to police. Officers from three different law enforcement units caught up with the trio later that evening on Interstate 75 and took them into custody.

Even before their arrest, the trio were known quantities ― Tenbrink and William Fears in particular. They are fairly representative specimens of the sort of flotsam that drifts through the the so-called “alt-right” and, increasingly, trails in the wake of any white nationalist chieftain, even one as snooty as Spencer. They are, in short, surly groupies for whiteness. Here’s what we know about them.

Tyler Tenbrink

Tenbrink, the man who fired the gun, is a white supremacist from Richmond, Texas. He told the Washington Post that he came to Spencer’s Gainesville speech because he received threats from the “radical left” after he was spotted at the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. But Tenbrink had been active in the white nationalist scene long before the August gathering.

In June, Tenbrink participated in a white supremacist rally at the Texas State Capitol building in Austin, according to the ADL. The ADL also identified Tenbrink at another Richard Spencer speech at Texas A&M University last December, a white supremacist protest in front of the Houston ADL offices last October, a private event organized by the neo-Nazi Aryan Renaissance Society last September, and a white supremacist protest in front of the Houston NAACP office last August.

Tenbrink told the Post that all he cares about are the “14 words,” a reference to the popular white supremacist slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.”

Tenbrink pled guilty to a felony assault charge in Texas in 2014. That means he now faces additional charges of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, the Gainesville Police Department wrote in a statement.

William Fears

William Fears, from Pasadena, Texas, claims he didn’t even know about the alt-right until Hillary Clinton condemned the movement in a campaign speech last August, at which point his radicalization journey began. By December, he was turning up at Spencer’s speaking events, including one at Texas A&M where Fears described himself as ”mainly an Internet troll.”

But Fears was more than a troll. In 2009, he pleaded guilty to aggravated kidnapping after he abducted an 18-year-old female University of Texas at Tyler student at knifepoint and “wounded her several times.” He has also been convicted of criminal trespassing and possession of a controlled substance. It was while he was incarcerated, he told the Post, that he had become racially aware.

“I don’t think any race experiences racism in the modern world the way that white people do in a jail,” he said. “In jail, whites come last.”

In May, Fears, who now works in construction, crashed a May Day rally with other neo-Nazis and reportedly assaulted a man. In June, he antagonized members of the Oath Keepers, a far-right militia movement, at a rally in Houston until one of them put him in a chokehold. In August, he showed up in Charlottesville to brawl in a helmet, gas mask and goggles, waving a white nationalist flag and shouting, “Shoot! Fire the first shot of the race war!” In September, he and other neo-Nazis tried to provoke anarchists at a Houston book fair to violence.

“Nazi is like the N-word for white people,” says Fears. “And I just embrace it.”

Colton Fears

Before coming to Spencer’s Gainesville speech, Colton Fears participated in the Charlottesville rally and an April counter-protest of a Houston Socialist Movement event as part of a group of white supremacists, which included neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right, the ADL said.

After the Charlottesville rally, Fears posted a 13-minute-long statement on YouTube. He congratulated himself for attending the event, lamented the mainstream media’s attack on Southern heritage, and complained bitterly about being doxxed. He made no mention of Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old protester who was killed at the rally.

In his interview with HuffPost, Fears tried to distance himself a little from the scene around him. He said of Richard Spencer, “I agree with like 75 percent of his ― he’s not ― he’s kind of a scam artist, in my opinion.” Asked if he identified as alt-right, he said: “I try and deny identity politics. That’s why I’m not wearing a white polo and all that stuff.” But he also served up a word salad of white grievance: “Like, OK, for one thing, say, you know, gay marriage, that’s cool, whatever, you know, except — that’s fine, I’m cool with it — well, then, what’s after that? The next step? This whole transgender movement, right? Well, if you don’t accept that, you’re a bigot, this and that. Well, that all goes hand in hand with being a white person.”

Asked about the pin he was wearing during the interview, Fears said “it’s basically just like an SS thing.” Explaining the significance of the pin would require an extensive conversation about World War II, he said. “And it’s my heritage, I’m German.”

 

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Right Hook Nazi of the Day

Not sure what was on this cretins mind, but he decided to march through anti-racist protesters at University of Florida in a shirt festooned with Nazi swastikas.

Bad choice…

Have you seen anyone since the 70’s wear mutton chops like that?

Fortunately there were no serious injuries, and the Florida Police kept things well in hand.

protests richard spencer university of florida

 

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