RSS

Tag Archives: welfare

The Great White Ghetto – Disability as Welfare

In the Great White Ghetto stretching along the Appalachians and extending west to Missouri, nearly 25% of the population is on a different kind of welfare.

Increasingly, these folks are supported not only by SNAP, or Food Stamps, but also suck the Federal teat in the form of fraudulent “Disability” payments. Entire families, including Mom, Dad, and children cheat the system by declaring themselves “unable to work”, or mentally and physically unable to function – often with the help of bribing medical doctors for diagnosis.This scam runs generations deep, with often the grandchildren of people on the program being declared “disabled”.

Near 50% of the people in this region are on Medicare, Medicaid, or Obamacare.

These folks are your Trump voters. And should Trumpcare, and the Trump budget pass – they are going to do something that hasn’t happened in 3 or 4 generations in their families…

Get jobs.

These folks make up the largest portion of people on disability, and make up 9% of the US Population

This year, the United States will spend more money on disability benefits than food stamps,

welfare, housing subsidies and unemployment. (Danielle Kunitz and Whitney Leaming)

Generations, disabled

A family on the fringes prays for the “right diagnoses”

PEMISCOT COUNTY, Mo. — The food was nearly gone and the bills were going unpaid, but they still had their pills, and that was what they thought of as the sky brightened and they awoke, one by one. First came Kathy Strait, 55, who withdrew six pills from a miniature backpack and swallowed them. Then emerged her daughter, Franny Tidwell, 32, who rummaged through 29 bottles of medication atop the refrigerator and brought down her own: oxcarbazepine for bipolar disorder, fluoxetine for depression, an opiate for pain. She next reached for two green bottles of Tenex, a medication for hyperactivity, filled two glasses with water and said, “Come here, boys.”

Disabled America: Between 1996 and 2015, the number of working-age adults receiving federal disability payments increased dramatically across the country — but nowhere more so than in rural America. In this series, The Washington Post explores how disability is shaping the culture, economy and politics of these small communities.

Part 1: Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

The boys were identical twins William and Dale, 10. They were the fourth generation in this family to receive federal disability checks, and the first to be declared no longer disabled and have them taken away. In days that had grown increasingly tense, as debts mounted and desperation grew to prove that the twins should be on disability, this was always the worst time, before the medication kicked in, when the mobile home was filled with the sounds of children fighting, dogs barking, adults yelling, television volume turned up.

And so went another morning, loud and chaotic, right up until the moment someone dropped the puppy.

As it fell the four feet to the ground, the trailer suddenly quieted. The four children stopped fighting. The two adults stopped yelling. Then the weeks-old puppy hit the scuffed linoleum floor, whimpered softly, and events, no longer suspended, began to unfold again.

“It’s dying,” Dale said, looking at the cocoa-colored dog, which had gone limp. “It’s dying. It’s dying.”

“It might have snapped its neck,” Kathy said.

William looked at the puppy, then at the medications collected above the refrigerator, then at his mother, Franny, who wasn’t saying anything.

“Mommy, give him some medicine to keep him alive,” William said.

“He’s dead,” Dale said.

“Give him some pain medicine!” William said.

“Your puppy just died,” Dale said.

“Give him some pain medicine!” William said again.

Talk of medications, of diagnoses, of monthly checks that never seem to cover every need — these are the constants in households like this one, composed of multiple generations of people living on disability. Little-studied and largely unreported, such families have become familiar in rural communities reshaped by a decades-long surge that swelled the nation’s disability rolls by millions before declining slightly in 2015 as older beneficiaries aged into retirement benefits, according to interviews with social workers, lawyers, school officials, academics and rural residents.

How to visualize the growth in disability in the United States? One way is to think of a map. Rural communities, where on average 9.1 percent of working-age people are on disability — nearly twice the urban rate and 40 percent higher than the national average — are in a brighter shade than cities. An even brighter hue then spreads from Appalachia into the Deep South and out into Missouri, where rates are higher yet, places economists have called “disability belts.” The brightest color of all can be found in 102 counties, mostly within these belts, where a Washington Post analysis of federal statistics estimates that, at minimum, about 1 in 6 working-age residents draw disability checks.

As the number of working-age Americans receiving disability rose from 7.7 million in 1996 to 13 million in 2015, so did the number of households with multiple family members on disability, climbing from an estimated 525,000 in 2000 to an estimated 850,000 in 2015, according to a Post analysis of census data. The analysis is probably an undercount.

A separate Post examination of census data found that households reporting at least one disabled adult are three times as likely to report having a disabled child, too, although most households affected by disability report only one disabled member. Multigenerational disability, The Post found, is far more common in poor families.

“I’ve been aware of it my whole professional life,” said Michael L. Price, a demographer who retired from the University of Louisville in 2013. “In eastern Kentucky and other rural areas, you’re more likely to have intergenerational households, not just two but three generations. You have grandparents, very young grandparents, living together with grandchildren or in close proximity. And families don’t separate, so it sets it up not only for the next generation, but for two generations, that ‘This is what’s there, this is what you’re dependent on.’ ”

Other experts, however, say the phenomenon has little to do with generational dependence. “I hesitate to use a term like ‘culture.’ It’s not a specific, measurable metric,” said Kathleen Romig, an analyst with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, who studies disability in the United States. “Certain things like toxic stress or nutrition or preterm births or parental depression or genetics” offer a more revealing context for understanding generational disability.

And yet others say it’s about money.

Ruth Horn, director of social services in Buchanan County, Va., which has one of the country’s highest rates of disability, has spent decades working with profoundly poor families. Some parents, she said, don’t encourage their children academically, and even actively discourage them from doing well, because they view disability as a “source of income,” and think failure will help the family receive a check.

“It’s not a hard thing to limit a person,” Horn said, adding: “It’s generations deep.”

For this family in Pemiscot County, crowding around their dazed puppy, the momentum was beginning to waver. The boys, who started receiving benefits after their premature birth, had recently lost them as the government stepped up its periodic reviews, which rose from 925,000 in 2010 to 2.1 million in 2016. Now their grandmother and mother, certain the twins were autistic, were trying to convince the government that it had made a mistake.

They knew it wouldn’t be easy but hoped that a psychological assessment of the children, due any day now, would provide just the proof they needed. In their minds it had come down to this: Prove the boys were autistic, get the checks back and climb from crushing poverty into manageable poverty.

Kathy set the puppy down on the kitchen table, and it took a wobbly step, then another.

“I’m going to name you Miracle,” she said softly. “Because it’s a miracle you’re alive.”…

 

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , ,

Racist Trump Troll Unmasked As Unemployed 34 Year Old Living Off His Father

Confirming the stereotype that much of the alt-right Trolls are 30 something unemployed, overweight, uneducated  failures living off mommy and daddy, who sit in the basement and spew hate.

Scotish man Colin Robertson has been revealed as the influential racist vlogger behind the ­Millennial Woes blog (Screen cap via Daily Record).

Influential YouTube racist unmasked as unemployed man living with his father

An influential racist YouTuber living in Scotland has been unmasked as an unemployed ex-student who still lives with his father.

The Daily Record has confirmed that a 34-year-old Linlithgow resident named Colin Robertson is the man behind the Millennial Woes YouTube channel, which counts more than 20,000 subscribers and over 2 million video views.

Robertson has become an influential voice within the white nationalist movement, and late last year he gave a speech at the National Policy Institute conference in Washington, D.C., where participants raised their arms in Nazi salutes and shouted, “Hail Trump!”

As the Record notes, Robertson is explicitly a white nationalist, as he believes that white people are the only people who should be allowed to lawfully live in the United Kingdom.

“I just didn’t want loads of black people in my country,” he said in a recent video. “It came down to a racial thing, a racial loyalty. I didn’t want black people, I didn’t want Indians, I didn’t want Chinese, I didn’t want Arabs, I wanted my country for my people.”

Although he has no formal job, the Record says Robertson claims to make enough money to live via ads for his incendiary videos, which he shoots in his father’s bedroom.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Right Wing Harassment of Welfare Recipients a Total Failure

Bad news for the white right. Unlike their racist stereotypes, most folks on welfare (SNAP) aren’t on drugs. Yet another state fails miserably making a racist assumption and passing it into law… This one by the man responsible to murdering and maiming children in Flint with tainted water.

Guess how many welfare recipients tested positive in Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s drug test?

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R), who faced criticism earlier this year for his handling of the water crisis in Flint, could face more pushback after the apparent failure of his program requiring drug tests for welfare users.

The Guardian reported that none of the 303 people tested under the auspices of the Family Independence Program have tested positive for drugs as of the end of May.

The pilot program ends on Sept. 30 and received $300,000 in state funding, although a spokesperson for the state health department said only $300 had been spent thus far.

“The governor will wait until the pilot program has concluded and the report is delivered, as required by the legislation, to reach any conclusions,” said Anna Heaton, a spokesperson for Snyder’s office.

The program allows health department officials to require applicants to go through a drug test based on the results of the 50-question screening process. Refusal to do so disqualifies them from receiving financial assistance for six months. However, none of the applicants reportedly refused to go through the test.

As Think Progress reported last year, several other states with similar programs also found little evidence of high drug use among social program recipients. For instance, only 11 out of 2,783 applicants in Kansas’ program tested positive.

“As we’ve seen time and time again, these misguided policies are devoid of any scientific credibility and have proven to be a colossal waste of our time and money,” said Eric Harris, a spokesperson for Rep. Gwen Moore (D-WI), who recently proposed a measure that would make drug tests mandatory for people reporting deductions of more than $150,000 on their tax returns.

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

GOP Mayor Wants to Publically Shame the Poor!

Wow! Talk about an evil GOP bastard with no sense of empathy, morals, or shame.

In 1834 a new Poor Law was introduced in the UK. Some people welcomed it because they believed it would:

  • reduce the cost of looking after the poor
  • take beggars off the streets
  • encourage poor people to work hard to support themselves

The new Poor Law ensured that the poor were housed in workhouses, clothed and fed. Children who entered the workhouse would receive some schooling. In return for this care, all workhouse paupers would have to work for several hours each day. The poor objected, and rioted against the law.

GOP mayor wants to build a website to publicly shame welfare recipients in his town

Lewiston Mayor Robert Macdonald has had enough. The Republican executive of the second-largest city in Maine wants to publicly shame the recipients of welfare in his state with a website listing every individual’s name, address and length of time on assistance.

Writing in an op-ed titled, “Enough is Enough: Mainers have a right to know how their money is spent,” Macdonald proposed “a major overhaul of the many laws and policies dealing with confidentiality” and called for a website listing the personal information of every Maine resident receiving public assistance — or as he referred to it, “on the dole.”

Privacy laws, Macdonald contended, were an impediment to Maine residents’ right to know how their tax dollars are being spent, pointing to the “the fear they strike into the average law-abiding citizen.”

Macdonald, who writes a regular column for the Twin City Times, is running for reelection and promised to submit a bill for consideration to the state legislature that is model after an existing website listing recipients of state-funded pensions:

In Maine there is a website that lists the pension amounts received by everyone who is issued a monthly check by the State of Maine. No privacy here because this is being paid out by the State; accordingly, taxpayers have a right to know.

Yet other recipients of state revenues are shielded. Yes, I am referring to those known as welfare recipients.  Why are they treated differently than pensioners? (A rhetorical question).

The answer: our liberal, progressive legislators and their social-service allies have made them a victimized, protected class. It’s none of your business how much of your money they get and spend. Who are you to question it? Just shut up and pay!

Well, the days of being quiet are gone. We will be submitting a bill to the next legislative session asking that a website be created containing the names, addresses, length of time on assistance and the benefits being collected by every individual on the dole. After all, the public has a right to know how its money is being spent.

But that’s not all. Macdonald also promised to introduce a measure cutting off public assistance to low-income Mainers for any child born while the mother is already receiving welfare as well as a 60-month lifetime limit on benefits.

Macdonald ended his weekly column by promising to “talk about our progressive liberal friends’ war on the elderly” in next week’s edition.

Prisons as warehouses for the poor…

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 24, 2015 in Stupid Republican Tricks, Stupid Tea Bagger Tricks

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

On that conservative Welfare Meme & Uncle Ben Carson

An 1860’s handbill, containing all of the elements of the current conservative-Republican belief system abut race, welfare, and white victimization

In the late 1860’s conservatives, including the first KKK, sought to stir up white resentment by attacking the Freedmen’s Bureau with a number of falsified accusations. Like today’s conservatives (with the help of the 3rd KKK), today’s Republicans argue the “dissolution of the black family” the loss of “work ethic”, and “black laziness” having as a root cause the Great Society (re: Welfare) Programs instituted under President Lyndon Johnson. Frequently quoting numbers of $15 trillion to $30 trillion devise by the conservative “think tank” The Heritage Institute, racist conservatives conveniently ignore the fact that the Heritage Institutes numbers are fake – and that whatever that amount may be – nearly 80% of that money was spent on places like The Great White Ghetto, and other areas of the Republican led, poverty stricken South. Not the inner city, mostly black ghetto.

The same three elements are carried over from this racist handbill to today’s racist Republican Party:

  • The “Hard working white man” vs the “Lazy Negro”
  • White Victimization in terms of (falsely claimed) benefits to whites vs blacks
  • That hard working whites are supporting lazy blacks though their hard earned tax money.

Ben Carson’s claim that ‘we have 10 times more people on welfare’ since the 1960s

Ben Carson, a neurosurgeon who is seeking the GOP presidential nomination, asserted in a television interview that government efforts to ease poverty have largely been a failure. He specifically made two claims — that $19 trillion has been spent on anti-poverty programs since the mid-1960s and that “we have 10 times more people on welfare.” More generally, he also said that there are more people living in poverty.

We’ve often explained that statistics can be manipulated when comparing decades. For instance, the population of the United States is 60 percent larger in 2015 than it was in 1965, so it may not be relevant to compare raw numbers. There are definitional issues, such as what constitutes an “anti-poverty” or “welfare” program. Is it all means-tested programs, including health insurance such as Medicaid that also assists people above the poverty line? Or should it be limited to traditional anti-poverty programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)?

Let’s check out Carson’s math.

The Facts

Eligibility for participation in government benefit programs can be based either on financial need (means-tested) or the occurrence of an event (such as reaching retirement age). Examples of mean-tested “social welfare” programs include TANF; food stamps; Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the disabled; Special Supplemental Nutritional Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC); public or subsidized rental housing; free or reduced-priced school meals; and Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor.

Doug Watts, a Carson campaign spokesman, said, “We’re speaking of means-tested public assistance programs.”

Under that rubric, the “federal government is spending almost $1 trillion a year on welfare programs that provide cash, food, housing, medical treatment, social services, training, and education to poor and low-income Americans,” providing benefits and cash to almost 100 million recipients, Watts said. “Dr. Carson recognizes the need and value of public assistance. Our point is the way government has addressed it, by virtually throwing money and programs, that have mostly proved ineffective or inadequate at reducing poverty.”

The poverty rate in 1965 was 15 percent, when the “war on poverty” announced by President Lyndon Johnson began to be implemented; Watts noted that in 2010 it was still 15 percent. (It was 14.5 percent in 2013, the first drop since 2006.) Watts also provided two other figures, though without providing a source: In 1965, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) “had roughly 400,000 cases (recipients),” he said. “In 2015, TANF (the successor to AFDC) had 3.1 million recipients. That alone is 8 times.”

100 million recipients

Definitions are important for this number, which is made up primarily of people on Medicaid (64.9 million people in 2014) and food stamps (46.5 million in 2014). But Medicaid is increasingly aimed at the elderly (people in nursing homes) or the disabled. “Medicaid spending per participant is much higher for people who are elderly, disabled, or pregnant than it is for nondisabled children or for working-age adults who are not disabled or pregnant,” the Congressional Budget Office said in a report. The Medicaid rolls have also expanded because the Affordable Care Act extended it to some people with income above the Federal Poverty Level.

The 100 million figure is a bit misleading, though, because it includes anyone who resides in a household in which at least one person (such as someone who is disabled) receives a means-tested payment. As of the fourth quarter of 2012, the Census Bureau says, the number stood at 109 million, but the Medicaid figure is listed as nearly 82 million, far higher than the number of people who actually receive Medicaid. Indeed, other census data indicates that 82 percent of the households that receive means-tested benefits included at least one person who was working.

In a May report, the Census Bureau said 52.2 million people — 21.3 percent of the population— participated in one or more major means-tested assistance programs, on average, each month. That seems a much more reasonable figure to use — and it’s about half the size of number touted by the Carson campaign.

The poverty rate

In saying that the poverty rate has barely changed, the Carson campaign is referring to the official poverty rate. It is worth noting that even by the official metric, the rate has declined slightly since 1965. But increasingly scholars believe the official figure is not especially informative because noncash benefits such as Medicaid, food stamps or public housing are not recorded as income, meaning it does not capture the effect of anti-poverty programs that Carson suggests are ineffective.

The Census Bureau has tried to mitigate these concerns with a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) introduced in 2011. In fact, the 2014 report by the White House Council of Economic Advisers reassessed poverty rates over time using the SPM.

“Poverty rates fell from 25.8 percent in 1967 to 16 percent in 2012 — a decline of nearly 40 percent,” the report concluded. “In 2012 alone, the combined effect of all federal tax, cash and in-kind aid programs was to lift approximately 14.5 percent of the population — over 45 million people — out of poverty.”

$19 trillion in spending

Carson’s $19 trillion figure is within the range of estimates by right-leaning organizations that have placed spending for anti-poverty programs at $15 trillion to $20 trillion in the past 50 years. These figures, which are in inflation-adjusted dollars, include spending on about 80 means-tested programs by the federal government, plus state and local governments. The estimates include items such as nearly $100 billion for education programs, with about half devoted to Pell Grants for college, as well as the refundable portion of the Earned Income Tax Credit — which one can receive receive if you hold a job. So some might find it debatable that all of these programs constitute “welfare.”

Medicaid, again, is a huge part of the number — but the growth in the Medicaid budget is reflective of increases in health-care costs in general. The Congressional Research Service, in a 2012 report, says that between 1962 and 2011, “federal outlays for low-income health programs have increased, in inflation-adjusted terms, at a rate of 13.3 percent per year versus 6.5 percent for other spending.”

And while $19 trillion sounds like a lot of money, that’s over half a century. In context, federal spending in constant dollars amounts to nearly $110 trillion in that period.…More…

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Republicans and Welfare

 

Poor people are “animals”…

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 14, 2015 in American Greed, Domestic terrorism

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Republicans on Welfare

A favorite conservative line is that they are paying for black folks on welfare with their taxes. The following is a list of the counties in America with the highest Food Stamp benefits…

PERCENTAGE OF EACH GROUP THAT RECEIVES FOOD STAMPS
COUNTY STATE 2009 POP. ALL PEOPLE WHITES BLACKS CHANGE ’07-’09
Starr Texas 63,177 36% 63% 19% +6%
Costilla Colorado 3,173 24% 62% 77% +22%
McKinley New Mexico 71,477 28% 56% 0% +11%
Owsley Kentucky 4,667 49% 49% >90% +5%
Wolfe Kentucky 6,933 42% 43% 14% +5%
Clay Kentucky 24,102 37% 39% 9% +5%
Ripley Missouri 13,446 39% 39% 22% +22%
Lee Kentucky 7,389 37% 39% 6% +3%
McCreary Kentucky 17,341 37% 38% 7% +8%
Hancock Tennessee 6,669 37% 38% 26% +18%
Dunklin Missouri 31,300 44% 37% >90% +16%
Grundy Tennessee 14,182 36% 37% 6% +29%
Magoffin Kentucky 13,101 37% 37% 18% +2%
Carter Missouri 5,867 36% 37% 60% +14%
Washington Missouri 24,817 35% 36% 18% +24%

Notice anything?

ANd the two counties where “>90%” of black folks are on food stamps?

Dunklin, Missouri

The racial makeup of the county was 88.64% White, 8.68% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.03% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races.

Owsley, Kentucky

The racial makeup of the county was 99.22% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.02% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

You can look at the full data set here.

A Map showing the levels of SNAP recipients on a County level also shows something else interesting. The majority of the counties in America with 25%, 50%, or more on Food Stamps…

Are in the very Republican South. The darker areas represent counties where 30% or more of the population is on SNAP.

According to a TIME analysis of county-by-county food stamp enrollment data, GOP politicians represent more districts that majorly (30%+) participate in SNAP than Democrats.
 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: