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Va Gov Restores Voting Rights to Felons

Republicans hate this, especially sine the vast majority of people incarcerated at the state level under “Get tough on…” knee jerk laws have been black. Incarcerating black folks was a key to Jim Crow in eliminating the possibility of blacks voting. No different than under the New Jim Crow Voter ID Laws.

Va Governor McAuliffe is a close Clinton ally, so this may presage a larger effort should Hillary Clinton win the Presidency.

If it is true that 1 in 5 black men in Virginia is disenfranchised, and will ultimately allowed to vote…It is the death of the Republican Party in statewide and federal Senate elections in the state, as the difference in the last few elections has only been less than 100,000 votes.

Virginia Governor Restores Voting Rights to Felons

Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia used his executive power on Friday to restore voting rights to more than 200,000 convicted felons, circumventing the Republican-run legislature. The action overturns a Civil War-era provision in the state’s Constitution aimed, he said, at disenfranchising African-Americans.

The sweeping order, in a swing state that could play a role in deciding the November presidential election, will enable all felons who have served their prison time and finished parole or probation to register to vote. Most are African-Americans, a core constituency of Democrats, Mr. McAuliffe’s political party.

Amid intensifying national attention over harsh sentencing policies that have disproportionately affected African-Americans, governors and legislatures around the nation have been debating — and often fighting over — moves to restore voting rights for convicted felons.

In Kentucky, Gov. Matt Bevin, a newly elected Republican, recently overturned an order enacted by his Democratic predecessor that was similar to the one Mr. McAuliffe signed Friday. In Maryland, Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, vetoed a measure to restore voting rights to convicted felons, but Democrats in the state legislature overrode him in February and an estimated 44,000 former prisoners who are on probation are now eligible to register for voting.

“There’s no question that we’ve had a horrible history in voting rights as relates to African-Americans — we should remedy it,” Mr. McAuliffe said in an interview Thursday, previewing the announcement he made on the steps of Virginia’s Capitol, just yards from where President Abraham Lincoln once addressed freed slaves. “We should do it as soon as we possibly can.”

The action, which Mr. McAuliffe said was justified under an expansive legal interpretation of his executive clemency authority, provoked an immediate backlash from Virginia Republicans. They issued a statement Friday accusing the governor of “political opportunism” and “a transparent effort to win votes.”

“Those who have paid their debts to society should be allowed full participation in society,” said the statement from the party chairman, John Whitbeck. “But there are limits.” He said Mr. McAuliffe was wrong to issue a blanket restoration of rights, even to those who “committed heinous acts of violence.”

Friday’s shift in Virginia is part of a national trend toward restoring voter rights to felons, based in part on the hope that it will aid former prisoners’ re-entry into society. Over the last two decades about 20 states have acted to ease their restrictions, according to the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University.

Only two states — Maine and Vermont — have no voting restrictions on felons. On the other side, 12 states disenfranchise felons after they have completed probation or parole, said Marc Mauer, executive director of the Sentencing Project, a Washington policy organization that advocates restoring felons’ voting rights.

Virginia has been one of four states — the others are Kentucky, Florida and Iowa — that impose the harshest restrictions, a lifetime ban on voting for felons. The Sentencing Project says one in five African-Americans in Virginia cannot vote….The Rest Here

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Federal Appeals Court Overturns Anti-LGBT Law in Virginia

And because it is the 4th Federal Appeals Court the ruling also sets legal precedent for North Carolina.

Court overturns Va. school’s transgender bathroom rule

A federal appeals court has overturned a policy barring a transgender student from using the boys’ restrooms at his Virginia high school.

A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that the Gloucester County School Board policy is discriminatory. A federal judge had rejected Gloucester High School student Gavin Grimm’s sex discrimination claim.

The appeals court’s ruling establishes legal precedent in the five states in the 4th Circuit, including North Carolina, which faces a lawsuit challenging a new state law requiring transgender public school students to use the bathroom that corresponds to the sex on their birth certificate.

“I feel so relieved and vindicated by the court’s ruling,” Grimm said in a statement released by the American Civil Liberties Union, which represents him. “Today’s decision gives me hope that my fight will help other kids avoid discriminatory treatment at school.”

Grimm was born female but identifies as male. After complaints, the school board adopted a policy requiring students to use public restrooms corresponding with their biological gender.

Grimm, 16, said he started refusing to wear girls’ clothes by age 6 and told his parents he was transgender in April 2014.

Grimm’s parents helped him legally change his name and a psychologist diagnosed him with gender dysphoria, characterized by stress stemming from conflict between one’s gender identity and assigned sex at birth. Grimm began hormone treatment to deepen his voice and give him a more masculine appearance.

School officials told CBS affiliate WTVR they received complaints from dozens of parents in regards to the bathroom issue.

“It shall be the practice of the (Gloucester County Public Schools) to provide male and female restroom and locker room facilities in its schools, and the use of said facilities shall be limited to the corresponding biological genders, and students with gender identity issues shall be provided an alternative private facility,” the school board said in its ruling on the issue.

At that time, the school also built several unisex private restrooms for all students to use.

Grimm said for him, this battle is about much more than just using a certain restroom.

“I’m banned from a gender specific place and it is a big issue for me, this is one way the school is saying, we do not believe you are legitimate, and that is a big deal to me,” he said.

The case of Grimm has been especially closely watched since North Carolina enacted a law last month that bans transgender people from using public restrooms that correspond to their gender identity. That law also bans cities from passing anti-discrimination ordinances, a response to an ordinance recently passed in Charlotte.

In the Virginia case, a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals — which also covers North Carolina — ruled 2-1 to overturn the Gloucester County School Board’s policy, saying it violated Title IX, the federal law that prohibits discrimination in schools. A federal judge had previously rejected Grimm’s sex discrimination claim, but the court said that judge ignored a U.S. Department of Education regulation that transgender students in public schools must be allowed to use the restroom that corresponds with their gender identity.

“We agree that it has indeed been commonplace and widely accepted to separate public restrooms, locker rooms, and shower facilities on the basis of sex,” the court wrote in its opinion. “It is not apparent to us, however, that the truth of these propositions undermines the conclusion we reach regarding the level of deference due to the department’s interpretation of its own regulations.”

Maxine Eichner, a University of North Carolina law professor who is an expert on sexual orientation and the law, said the ruling — the first of its kind by a federal appeals court — means the provision of North Carolina’s law pertaining to restroom use by transgender students in schools that receive federal funds also is invalid.

“The effects of this decision on North Carolina are clear,” she said, adding that a judge in that state will have no choice but to apply the appeals court’s ruling.

Other states in the 4th Circuit are Maryland, West Virginia and South Carolina. While those states are directly affected by the appeals court’s ruling, Eichner said the impact will be broader.

“It is a long and well-considered opinion that sets out the issues,” she said. “It will be influential in other circuits.”

 

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Toni Morrison…A Pornographer?

More on conservatives getting stupid. The Republican majority house and senate in Virginia has passed a law banning Morrison’s books because there are sexual scenes in the books.

The right wing christian Taliban is at it again.

Virginia’s Governor is trying to decide whether Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison is a pornographer

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is currently deciding whether Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison is a pornographer.

Last month, both houses of the Virginia Legislature passed a bill requiring schools to warn parents if teachers are planning to read books with explicit content. The bill was prompted by a concerned parent, Laura Murphy, who learned that one of her sons was reading Morrison’s novel “Beloved,” which includes graphic depictions of rape and infanticide. Murphy and sympathetic lawmakers cited similarly explicit material in books such as “The Bluest Eye,” also by Morrison, “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison and “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy.

“I don’t shelter my kids, but I have to be a responsible parent. I want to make sure every kid in the county is protected,” Murphy told the Washington Post.

McAuliffe has not yet said whether he will support the bill. As a teacher, parent and avid book reader, I believe he should not. This bill simply doesn’t go far enough. In fact, New Jersey lawmakers should go further than their Virginia counterparts and draft a law that takes us back to the days of banned books. After all, this may be the last chance we have to actually make books interesting to students.

It is true, as critics have charged, that the Virginia proposal puts the state on a slippery slope to censorship. It also makes the good folks of Virginia look a tad provincial.

“Toni Morrison has won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and she’s the last American author to win the Nobel Prize for literature,” noted state Sen. Janet D. Howell, who opposed the Virginia bill. “So let’s just make ourselves look ridiculous.”

But what’s really ridiculous is that we are bypassing a golden opportunity to remind kids that great books contain sex, love, comedy, sex, drama, violence and — finally — sex. You know, all the stuff they think the Internet invented.

Indeed, supporters of the Virginia book bill are right about one thing: We are facing a crisis. But it has nothing to do with books. The prevalence of visual media in the lives of both adults and children is so overwhelming that it threatens basic things that make us human: contemplation, solitude, sustained thought. One doesn’t have to spend much time on Vine or YouTube to realize that if young minds are being damaged, it ain’t a poetic 300-page Toni Morrison novel we have to worry about.

Obviously, there are distinctions to be made here between third-graders and high school seniors. Nevertheless, the fact that anyone believes more harm than good can come out of reading a book with challenging ideas and language is ignorance in its purest form: a sad yet disturbing lack of knowledge.

On the other hand, if word gets out that classics written by the likes of James Joyce, Philip Roth or Morrison have naughty bits, maybe kids will be tempted to put down their phones for a minute or two. Or maybe they’ll pick their phones up and spread the word that literature actually pulses with stuff that’s interesting and important.

Plus, the Virginia bill, as currently written, might not even work. Notify parents that Jane or Johnny is reading smutty books? That would require Mom to remove her steamed-up glasses and stop reading “Fifty Shades of Grey” for the 50th time. And that would require Dad to … pause the video game he is playing. Because, as is well-known, adult men have pretty much given up on reading.

And by the way: Shouldn’t parents already know what their kids are reading in class? Aren’t they supposed to speak to their children about school from time to time? I know most kids offer grunts in lieu of coherent responses. But if you can’t get the title of a book out of your child — and perhaps read and judge the entire book for yourself — then you just might have bigger parental problems.

It’s worth mentioning here that there’s a tendency to sneer at the conservative Republican leanings of those who support the Virginia book bill. But overly sensitive liberal types have their own problems in this area. Some believe college professors should stay away from books with racist or sexist elements, which might traumatize fragile minds.

If the good Virginia legislators are so worried about kids seeing pornography…

Then they better ban the Internet…Where they can see the naked Women for Trump.

 

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Virginia Ends Reciprocal Handgun Permits

In a move that has already toasted the Republicans and associated gun crazies, the AG of Virginia has ended agreements with states who allow people with mental disorders, convicted felons, are fugitives of state or federal justice, and/or convicted stalkers to conceal carry guns.

Good Move!

Virginia revokes handgun permit agreement with 25 states

Concealed handgun permits held by residents of 25 states will no longer be valid in Virginia, the state’s attorney general said Tuesday, drawing swift criticism from GOP lawmakers.

Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat, said the state will revoke its reciprocity agreement with the states because their concealed weapon laws don’t meet Virginia’s standards. Those states hand out permits to people who are barred under the Virginia law, like fugitives, convicted stalkers and drug dealers, which undermines the state’s law and puts residents at risk, he said.

“Evenly, consistently and fairly enforcing Virginia’s concealed handgun permit law, as we are now doing, means that it will be more difficult for potentially dangerous individuals to conceal their handguns here in Virginia and that will make Virginians safer, especially Virginian law enforcement,” Herring said.

The move means that Virginians will no longer be able to use their concealed handgun permits in six states that require a mutual reciprocity agreement: Florida, Louisiana, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Wyoming.

John Whitbeck, chairman of the Virginia Republican Party, said Herring’s announcement was further proof that Democrats have “declared war on the Second Amendment.”

The top Republican in the GOP-controlled House of Delegates said that Herring is “damaging the integrity of the office he holds.”

“Despite promising to take politics out of the attorney general’s office, Mark Herring consistently seeks to interpret and apply the law of the Commonwealth through the lens of his own personal, political opinions,” House Speaker William Howell said.

Lars Dalseide, a spokesman for the National Rifle Association, said concealed handgun reciprocity agreements between states have ended before, but his organization is unaware of another state ever implementing a change of this magnitude.

 

 
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Posted by on December 22, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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More of that Persecution and Ignorance By christians in Virginia

This is the Statement of Faith in Islam in Arabic, called the Shahada, and is the first of the “Five Pillars” of the Islamic Faith –

It says –

“There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is the messenger of Allah.” In the Middle East you will find this statement at the entry to every Mosque, as well as displayed in the homes and businesses of the faithful.

It also is quite possibly the most recognized piece of Calligraphy in the world, even among those not of the Islamic faith.

So what happens when American christian bigots confront the world’s most known calligraphy? You betcha. For a religion supposedly founded on the blood of martyrs who were fed to the Lions and tortured but stood firm in their faith…These modern “christians” sure have some weak faith. So weak in fact, it is no faith at all.

“You may be 38 years old, as I happen to be. And one day, some great opportunity stands before you and calls you to stand up for some great principle, some great issue, some great cause. And you refuse to do it because you are afraid…. You refuse to do it because you want to live longer…. You’re afraid that you will lose your job, or you are afraid that you will be criticized or that you will lose your popularity, or you’re afraid that somebody will stab you, or shoot at you or bomb your house; so you refuse to take the stand.

Well, you may go on and live until you are 90, but you’re just as dead at 38 as you would be at 90. And the cessation of breathing in your life is but the belated announcement of an earlier death of the spirit.”
Martin Luther King Jr.

Virginia Schools Close After Uproar Over Arabic Calligraphy Lesson

“It is outrageous to believe she is trying to convert anyone to Islam.”

A Virginia school district closed all of its schools and offices after an outcry over a high school geography lesson that included an example of Arabic religious calligraphy.

The lesson, which was part of a world geography class at Riverheads High School, asked the students to copy the Arabic letters that translate to: “There is no god but Allah, and Muhammad is the messenger of Allah.”

The school said the lesson wasn’t to promote Islam but to study “the artistic complexity of the calligraphy,” superintendent Eric Bond said in a news release cited by the News Leader newspaper.

In addition, the Virginia Department of Education confirmed to the Daily Progress that the lesson met state geography standards, which require learning the language and religion of each region under study.

But some parents were outraged.

“I will not have my children sit under a woman who indoctrinates them with the Islam religion when I am a Christian, and I’m going to stand behind Christ,” Kimberly Herndon, an Augusta County parent, told CBS 6.

Herndon also organized a community meeting at a local church.

On Facebook, Herndon said the geography teacher, Cheryl LaPorte, should lose her job.

“She should be FIRED for that,” Herndon wrote. “She should be fired because she had them write an abomination to their faith and causes a little girl to cry herself to sleep because she was worried she had denounced her God.”

Some students said the lesson made them uncomfortable.

A lot of people got really upset and I refused to do the paper,” Laurel Truxell, a ninth grader, told NBC 29. “I just felt uncomfortable learning about it in a world geography class, you shouldn’t teach religion in school unless you’re in a religious class.”

A Facebook page set up to protest the school was quickly overwhelmed by posts in support of the teacher. It was eventually taken offline, according to the News Leader.

“I love this school, and Mrs. LaPorte is a wonderful teacher,” the paper quoted Kari Watson as saying. “It is outrageous to believe she is trying to convert anyone to Islam. Please, choose your media outlets wisely and be aware of what you’re spreading.”

“The thing is, she wasn’t forcing Islam on anyone,” Anna Arneson, a sophomore who took LaPorte’s class last year, told the Daily Progress. “As a Christian, I didn’t find it oppressing at all.”

Arneson said the class taught her to understand people of different cultures and faiths.

“I feel that’s a part of growing up is learning acceptance,” she said.

“I was hoping that we’ve come further along in our community to be more open-minded,” Riverheads alumni Grace Zimmerman told ABC station WHSV.

Despite support from students, the district has been receiving numerous complaint calls and emails, many of which were sent from people outside of the area.

The Augusta County Public Schools said the sheriff’s department recommended the closure of schools due to “concerns regarding the tone and content” of the communications, according to a statement from the school board posted online by NBC 29.

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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New Documentary on Rosenwald Schools

The history of black education in America is difficult to separate from the legacy of the Rosenwald Schools. Julius Rosenwald, who rose to be President of Sears and Roebucks, charity built nearly 5,000 schools in the segregated South for black children. Black parents paid a “double tax” to get the schools built and operated in the 14 states of the South, as on top of their normal state and local taxes, they had to raise and donate about 14% of the cost of the school – which I will detail in the second article below.

Julius Rosenwald, center, started the Rosenwald Fund to help build schools in the segregated South. “Rosenwald” is a new documentary by filmmaker Aviva Kempner.

Rosenwald’s generosity captured in new film

In age that exalts politicians and entertainers who can’t stop telling us how wonderful they are, it is refreshing to honor a man who accomplished a lot without wanting his name on all of it.

Julius Rosenwald, who never finished high school but rose to become president and co-owner of Sears, Roebuck and Co., didn’t want his name on the store that he led to worldwide success.

Rosenwald, who died in 1932, didn’t want his name on Chicago’s magnificent Museum of Science and Industry, although he funded and promoted it so much that many Chicagoans called it “the Rosenwald museum” anyway.

He didn’t want his name on his other edifices, including more than 5,000 schools that he helped fund for black schoolchildren across the segregated South.

Yet, alumni of those schools still call them “the Rosenwald schools.” I know. Some of those alumni are in my family.

I discovered that tidbit of family information in the way journalists often stumble across information about themselves while pursuing stories about somebody else.

I was being interviewed by Washington, D.C., filmmaker Aviva Kempner for her new documentary, “Rosenwald,” when she asked if any of my southern relatives, most of them in Alabama, attended Rosenwald schools. I didn’t know, I said, but it was possible. I have a lot of cousins.

I later asked my cousin Willie Howard, a whiz in the telecommunications industries, and he broke out in a big grin. “We all did,” he said.

Alumni more famous than my cousins include poet-author Maya Angelou, director George C. Wolfe, U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia and Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson, all of whom are interviewed in the film.

Indeed, Kempner’s “Rosenwald,” now in select theaters, may well leave you convinced that former United States poet laureate Rita Dove, another Rosenwald school alum, was right when she called the Rosenwald Fund “the single most important funding agency for African-American culture in the 20th century.”

Besides underwriting the mostly rural grade schools, the Rosenwald Fund awarded fellowships to such rising stars as classical vocalist Marian Anderson, poet Langston Hughes, painter Jacob Lawrence, photographer Gordon Parks and writers James Baldwin, Arna Bontemps, Zora Neale Hurston and Ralph Ellison.

The most intriguing question, among the many that the film explores, is why Rosenwald, whose father immigrated from Germany in 1851 with $20 in his pocket, was so modest yet so generous.

As the late civil rights leader Julian Bond, whose father and uncle were Rosenwald fellows, puts it in the film, “He did not have to care about black people, but he did.”

The answer, Rosenwald’s biographers say, can be found in his faithfulness to the Jewish ideals of “tzedakah” (charity) and “tikkun olam” (repairing the world).

According to Stephanie Deutsch, author of the 2011 book “You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South,” Rosenwald said in one of his speeches that “We like to look down on the Russians because of the way they treat the Jews, and yet we turn around, and the way we treat our African-Americans is not much better.”

Rosenwald was also influenced by Booker T. Washington, conservative founder of the Tuskegee Institute, who suggested the funding of schools as the best investment for the future of black America.…More…

 

Rosenwald Schools

By: Dr. Alyce Miller, associate professor of history at John Tyler Community College and Dr. Brian J. Daugherity, assistant professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University

The Rosenwald school building program, in many ways the brainchild of Virginia-born and Hampton-educated Booker T. Washington, occurred during the period of segregation and Jim Crow across the American South. Segregated school systems were supposed to be, according to the U.S. Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), “separate and equal,” but in reality educational systems for African Americans in Virginia and the South were anything but. This made the funds provided by educational grant programs such as the Rosenwald Fund so significant.

Rosenwald schools were public schools that were built using matching grant funds. The Rosenwald Fund required matching funds from any combination of public and private sources. According to Julius Rosenwald Fund records (JRF), the JRF helped construct 367 schools, three teacher’s homes, and eleven school (industrial) shops in Virginia. Of the total cost of Rosenwald-associated buildings, grounds, and equipment in Virginia from 1917 through 1932, African Americans contributed 22%, white contributions totaled 1%, the Rosenwald Fund contributed 15%, and state and local government contributions equaled 62%. In the fifteen states in the South where the school building program operated, African Americans collectively contributed 17% of the funds, the Rosenwald Fund contributed 15% of the funds, private white contributions totaled 4% of the funds, and public funds made up the remaining 64% of the funds. Without the organization of local African American communities willing to pay what historian James D. Anderson referred to as the “double tax,” these schools would not have been built.

In late Fall 2015, VCU Special Collections will launch an online exhibit, Black Education in Goochland County: From Rosenwald Schools through Brown v. Board of Education, comprised of research and oral history interviews related to African American educational activism in Virginia and, specifically, Goochland County. The interviews and research were conducted by Dr. Alyce Miller, Dr. Brian Daugherity, and Cris Silvent, associate professor of art at John Tyler Community College.

The local activism surrounding Rosenwald schools continues today in movements throughout the Commonwealth to preserve the histories, and structures, of these schools. John Tyler Community College (and the Virginia Community College system) has been working on an initiative to increase student engagement and success using student and faculty involvement in Rosenwald school activities. The excitement and commitment surrounding this activism provides us with an opportunity to engage the younger generation in this history and in education in general. We have also partnered with Preservation Virginia (among others) to create a larger network of Rosenwald school information across the Commonwealth.

In today’s featured image, you can see the number of Rosenwald schools built in counties throughout Virginia. You can find more information on the number of schools built in each county in Virginia (and throughout the South) by accessing the Rosenwald Schools Database at Fisk University. This is available online here. Schools were not often named after Julius Rosenwald, at his own request.

This short documentary (not the one Paige discusses above) is about the restoration of the Russell School in North Carolina

 
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Posted by on September 10, 2015 in Black History

 

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Policeman Indicted in KIlling of Portsmouth, Virginia Teen

The reason the racist right is in a near frenzy to attack BlackLivesMatter …

Is quite simply that the BLM Movement has gained traction.  We have seen more indictments of Police for egregious and illegal behavior this year, than I dare say in the last 20 years.

Which is pissing the racist right off. Now, more than ever they need folks who will deny what is going on….And it is a sellers market for any low moral Negro who is willing to buckdance.

Virginia Cop Indicted In Murder Of Unarmed Black Teen

WIlliam Chapman II

Portsmouth, Virginia, officer Stephen Rankin was indicted on a first-degree murder charge Thursday after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old earlier this year.

A grand jury decided to charge Rankin, who shot and killed William Chapman II outside a Walmart on April 22, according to The Virginian-Pilot. Autopsy reports obtained by the paper show that Chapman was shot in the face and chest, and that his body was carted off to the city medical examiner’s office with his hands cuffed behind his back.

“After a methodical deliberation of a thorough investigation by the Virginia state police, the state’s attorney determined that William Chapman was murdered by a police officer,” Chapman family attorney Jon Michael Babineau told The Guardian. “Today, the citizens of Portsmouth agreed.”

The Guardian reports on the incident:

The pair had engaged in a physical struggle after Rankin tried to arrest the 18-year-old on suspicion of shoplifting, according to police.

Witnesses said Chapman broke free and then stepped back towards the officer aggressively before being shot twice. The 18-year-old was the second unarmed man shot dead by Rankin in Portsmouth. An autopsy indicated Chapman was not shot at close range.

The shooting was investigated by the Virginia State Police, which passed its investigation to Portsmouth Commonwealth’s Attorney Stephanie Morales earlier this month. She said last week that she’d seek an indictment in Chapman’s death.

Rankin’s lawyer said the cop’s actions were justified.

“He gives Mr. Chapman commands, and it’s at that point Mr. Chapman charges at him and the officer had to respond,” Nicole Belote told WTKR.

Officer Rankin

Rankin was in the media spotlight in 2011 when he shot and killed another unarmed man, Kirill Denyakin, though he was cleared of all wrongdoing. Denyakin’s lawyer told 13 News Now that he was “unsurprised” the latest incident occurred and “thought he would do this again.”

The vast majority of Police Officers never discharge their weapon in the line of duty. Hard to believe one officer could be involved into situations of confronting unarmed suspects and need to fire his weapon…

Which gets into why the First Degree Murder Charge.

Officer Rankin’s previous unarmed victim Kirill Denyakin, whom he shot 11 times…

 

 
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Posted by on September 4, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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