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Crime and the UN Soldiers

When I worked in Haiti shortly after the earthquake, there were nearly a million people displaced into temporary camps euphemistically called “Tent Cities” because many of the poorly constructed houses and buildings had been either destroyed outright, or so severely damaged as to be unsafe. On the eve of the earthquake the government has just spent enormous effort in rounding up the worst criminals in the country. Those guys were serial murderers, robbers, and rapists. The earthquake destroyed the walls of the prison and many escaped.

UN Troops were sent in to help patrol the streets and packed tent cities. Within a few months there were a number or rapes of women and children, with the worst night being 9 women raped in the same camp. They interviewed the victims, and sent in undercover police. They caught the perpetrators within a week. They all turned out to be UN Soldiers, from another 3rd world country. Because UN soldiers have what is in effect Diplomatic Immunity, the only thing they could do with them was to ship them back home and they would never be prosecuted for their crimes. Turns out, this is a common problem with UN Soldiers that happens again and again when they enter conflict zones or third world countries. The Haitians despised the UN Troops, due in large part due to their criminality which not only included sexual crimes but robbery and theft, and wanted them out of the country…

UN Troops parading on Bastille Day in France. All too often they ARE the problem.

More Sex Abuse by UN Troops Alleged in C. African Republic

A human rights group alleged Thursday that at least eight women and girls were raped or sexually exploited by U.N. peacekeepers late last year in Central African Republic, and the world body announced that more than 100 troops would be sent home.

Human Rights Watch said a 14-year-old and an 18-year-old alleged that peacekeepers gang-raped them near the airport in Bambari, the country’s second-largest city.

The U.N. peacekeeping mission in Central African Republic said later Thursday it had identified seven new possible victims in Bambari in cases that Human Rights Watch brought to its attention.

The U.N. said the soldiers implicated in the cases are from the Republic of Congo and Congo.

The mission said 120 soldiers from the Republic of Congo who were deployed to Bambari from Sept. 17 to Dec. 14 will be repatriated after an investigation is carried out. In the meantime, it said, they will be confined to barracks.

A fact-finding expert sent to Bambari found “sufficient initial evidence” that five alleged victims were minors and had been sexually abused, and that one adult had been sexually exploited, the mission said. The expert was unable to interview the seventh alleged victim. One allegation by Human Rights Watch had been previously reported and is currently under investigation, the mission said.

Parfait Onanga-Anyanga, the U.N. envoy for Central African Republic who traveled to Bambari on Thursday, expressed outrage and shame at the latest allegations, saying it is “a double crime” to attack vulnerable women and children that peacekeepers were sent to protect.

The new cases highlight concerns about peacekeeper abuse beyond the chaotic country’s capital.

The U.N. mission in Central African Republic tweeted that there have been 13 cases of sexual exploitation and abuse by peacekeepers in Bambari since September 2014.

The U.N. has been unable to explain why so many rapes and other sexual abuse by peacekeepers have been alleged in Central African Republic, which has been gripped by deadly violence between Christians and Muslims since late 2013. Thousands of U.N. and other peacekeepers have been in the country since then.

On Friday, U.N. Assistant Secretary-General Anthony Banbury came close to tears as he described four new child sex abuse cases in the country involving U.N. troops and police from Bangladesh, Congo, Niger and Senegal. It was the first time the world body had publicly named countries whose U.N. personnel are accused, as part of a new policy.

For all of 2015, Banbury said, there are likely to be 22 confirmed allegations of sexual abuse or exploitation in the U.N.’s peacekeeping mission in CAR, though that may rise as a result of Thursday’s allegations.

Human Rights Watch said it documented the latest eight cases of sexual exploitation and abuse during research in Bambari from Jan. 16-30. The organization said the temporary deployment of Republic of Congo peacekeepers to protect the city’s airport corresponds with most of the cases.

The group quoted a 14-year-old saying that in November, two armed peacekeepers attacked her as she walked by the base at the airport.

“They pulled me into the tall grass and one held my arms while the other one pinned down my legs and raped me,” she was quoted as saying. “The soldier holding my arms tried to hold my mouth, but I was still able to scream. Because of that they had to run away before the second soldier could rape me.”

An 18-year-old was quoted as saying that when she visited the Republic of Congo troops’ base near the airport seeking food or money, three armed peacekeepers forced her into the bush and gang-raped her.

“They said if I resisted they would kill me.”

 
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Posted by on February 6, 2016 in International Terrorism

 

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UN Inspectors Terrified By American Schools Treatment of Minorities

Welcome to the Third World…

U.N. Experts Seem Horrified By How American Schools Treat Black Children

American schools are hotbeds for racial discrimination, according to a preliminary report from a group of United Nations experts.

The U.N.’s Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent traveled around the U.S. last month to learn more about the various structural barriers and challenges African-American face. The group, which plans to release its full report in September, has given the media its preliminary findings, including several recommendations about reducing inequality in the U.S. education system.

The overall findings — which touch on topics of police brutality, school curriculum and mass incarceration — are bleak. African-Americans tend to have lower levels of income, education and food security than other Americans. This reflects “the level of structural discrimination that creates de facto barriers for people of African descent to fully exercise their human rights,” says the group’s statement.

Such gaps start early in life, the U.N. notes. Students of color are more likely than white children to face harsh punishments, such as suspension, expulsion and even school-based arrests. These disciplinary actions can lead to a phenomenon called the “school-to-prison pipeline,” by which children get pushed out of the education system and into the criminal justice system.

The U.N. experts also expressed concern about mass school closures, which typically target predominantly black neighborhoods, as has been the case in cities like Chicago and Philadelphia. Experts note high levels of school segregation, which “appears to be nurtured by a culture of insufficient acknowledgement of the history of enslavement and the Jim Crow Law.”

Finally, the statement highlights inadequate and inconsistent school curricula that insufficiently cover slavery and colonization.

The curriculum in some states “fails to adequately address the root causes of racial inequality and injustice,” according to the group. “Consequently, this contributes to the structural invisibility of African-Americans.”

To help address these issues, the U.N. panel recommends abolishing on-campus policing and making sure curricula “reflect appropriately the history of the slave trade.”

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2016 in American Genocide

 

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