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Facebook Cavalry Against Racist Trolls

The  alt-right has trained up a whole army of racist trolls to invade the Social Websites and Boards.

It can be awfully tough to fight these clowns if you are unprepared or don’t have the tools.

The Cavalry!

Volunteer Amy Melin (left) volunteers with White Nonsense Roundup, founded by Terri Kempton and Layla Tromble

These are your white allies on Facebook

When you’re exhausted from debating race with strangers, they step in

Social media conversations on race typically take one of two routes.

The first, and the one less traveled, leads to a thoughtful, fact-driven exchange of ideas. The second (more popular) route leads to bitter back-and-forth filled with tired stereotypes or racially inflammatory barbs.
But now, when discussion swerves in the second direction, there’s a group of white allies prepared to do the rerouting.
White Nonsense Roundup is a social media watchdog group with about 100 white volunteers. Its goal: to relieve people of color from the emotional labor of engaging with a person’s racist or racially insensitive thoughts.
Say, a person of color makes a post about Black Lives Matter. Then others respond with ignorant or offensive comments. That person can tag White Nonsense RoundUp to snatch some edges — or, better put, to educate people with context and fact-based views.
Think of it like roadside assistance for social media debates you’re tired of having.
“It’s really unfair that we expect people of color to experience racism, but then also explain it to us,” the group’s co-founder Terri Kempton, a book editor and college instructor, told CNN.

How it started

After Philando Castile’s killing in 2016, Kempton saw a need for proactive involvement by white people like herself in conversations about race.
“I think, as white people, we are taught that intentions are all that matters,” Kempton said. “We think that if our hearts are in the right places and we consciously doubt racism, we’re good to go. So that was a light-bulb moment to me, where I didn’t think intentions are enough.”
So, she approached another white friend, Layla Tromble, and together they launched White Nonsense Roundup on Facebook, Twitter and later Instagram.
“I thought, ‘What about if we take on some of that emotional labor or burden?'” Kempton said. “Because white people are responsible for talking to other white people about racism.”
Their idea worked. Since its launch, White Nonsense RoundUp has gained more than 138,000 followers across its different accounts.
One of them is Kevin Tillman, an educator in Oakland, California, who says he uses the service almost every day. Tillman, 40, is a leader in the vegan hip-hop movement and often encounters trolls online.
“It’s inspiring. I really appreciate the work that they’re doing and I steadily promote them,” he said. “And the reality is white folks will sooner listen to them. They’re handling things people of color have been handling all our lives.”
Chenoa Alamu discovered White Nonsense RoundUp when she came across one of their posts that said it’s not the job of black people to educate white people.
“I just couldn’t believe what I was reading. It was such a breath of fresh air,” said Alamu, a violinist in Springfield, Illinois.
“I feel strong enough and have felt strong enough to have conversations about race on my own. But I was getting tired,” she said. “When I saw the (White Nonsense RoundUp) post, that’s when I was like, ‘Phew, finally somebody white who gets it … someone willing to carry the burden of racism.'”…More
 
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Posted by on December 7, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter, The Post-Racial Life

 

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A Note to Trump Racist Trolls…

Meet IISuperwomanII. She has a message for you!

 
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Posted by on June 9, 2017 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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1,000 Paid Russian Trolls, and the Chumph Sock Puppet

Putin employed more than 1,000 hackers and trolls to get his Bitch into office over Hillary Clinton. They used fake news, lies, and distortions eagerly sucked up by useful fool, brainwashed Chumph supporters, playing to their racism and psychopathic, irrational hatred of Obama and Clinton. Fed lies for years by the “conservative” media and Republican party they were easily manipulated. Fueled by a love of the supermarket tabloid type salacious stories, these people were easily duped into believing even the most outrageous lies. Putin couldn’t have asked for a more willing and compliant group to commit treason against their own country.

The Russian disinformation campaign gained tremendous traction because the white wing’s chief candidate, was also it’s biggest useful fool. The Chumph seized on the Russian propaganda like a drowning man grabbing a lifeline, giving authority and legitimacy to the lies destroying his country. Even after becoming president, the Chumph tweeted, gave authenticity, and defended to the ramparts Russian planted propaganda, which were diaphanous transparent works to any semi-critical observer such as the Obama wiretapping claims.

The Chumph is Putin’s Bitch, and Putin used him again and again like a worn out sock puppet.

Putin OWNS the Chumph. Putin’s crime syndicate has been using him for years in money laundering, and profiteering schemes around the world, To do so, they have poured hundreds of millions into the Trump Scam to keep it afloat, and to carefully train their sock puppet to do their bidding. The so-called “Trump Name” is nothing more than branding for money laundering.

Trump is a traitor, and a member of the world’s largest international crime syndicate. A perfect tool for the Russian Mob, in that he is too fucking stupid to know he has been used.

This POS needs to go down, and locked away in one of those “Super-Max” prisons for treason, never again to see the full light of day. His accomplices, who unlike him, were smart enough to know what they were doing and who was paying them, need to go down too. Perhaps at the end of a rope.

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1,000 Paid Russian Trolls Spread Fake News On Hillary Clinton, Senate Intelligence Heads Told

A former FBI agent testified that President Donald Trump helped spread fake news by embracing the stories against his opponents.

Senate intelligence committee leaders have received reports that Russia hired at least 1,000 trolls to spread fake news stories to hurt Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton during the presidential election.

“What really concerns me [are reports] there were upwards of 1,000 paid internet trolls working out of a facility in Russia, in effect taking over a series of computers which are then called botnets that can generate news down to specific areas,” said Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), the ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee. He appeared Wednesday with GOP intel chair Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) at a press conference before committee hearings began.

The revelations reflect the results of a Huffington Post investigation this month, which found Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) had faced a “tsunami” of misinformation during his presidential campaign.

Warner said in the latest case, the paid trolls apparently focused on swing states in an attempt to influence votes there — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania — where people were “reading during the waning days of the election that “‘Clinton is sick,’ or ‘Clinton is taking money from whoever for some source’ … fake news.”

Warner said it’s crucial that investigators determine if voting results were actually affected. Each of the three states narrowly fell to Trump.

“An outside foreign adversary effectively sought to hijack the most critical democratic process, the election of a president, and in that process, decided to favor one candidate over another,” Warner said.

Burr said that he and Warner were committed to getting to the bottom of Russian interference in the election. He accused Russia of blatant attempts to also impact elections in Germany and France. “We feel part of our responsibility is to educate the rest of the world,” he said.

By the end of the first day of hearings Thursday, no one had yet testified about the 1,000 trolls, but the investigation is just beginning.

Former FBI agent Clint Watts, now a fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, testified that Russian attempts to influence the election started before the party nominees were chosen. Trump’s GOP presidential rival Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) appeared to be a particular target, he said.

“Through the end of 2015 and the start of 2016, the Russian-influenced system began to push themes and messages seeking to influence the result of the presidential election,” Watts said.

“Russian overt media outlets and covert trolls sought to sideline opponents on both sides of the political spectrum with adverse views towards the Kremlin,” he added. “They were in full swing during both the Republican and Democratic primary season, and may have helped sink the hopes of candidates more hostile to Russian interests long before the field narrowed.”

Watts said more details about the targeting of Rubio would be included in his written report to the committee.

He also testified that Trump helped spread fake news by embracing the stories that served the Russian agenda against his opponents.

Watts told the committee to “follow the dead bodies” to learn more, referring to several Russians connected to Kremlin fake news who have died in the past few months.

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday dismissed allegations of Kremlin interference in the U.S. elections as “fictional, illusory, provocations and lies.”

 

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Breaking the Alt-Right’s Piggy Bank

Surprised by Alt-Right and White Supremacist content on YouTube and Other sites…With Advertising for Coke or Pepsi right beside it?

While the tech companies were fine with it, and did little to filter it out – the big companies who buy ads aren’t happy at all.

Smack-down for the racist enabling tech companies.

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Major companies pulling advertisements a sign that many doubt Google’s ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos

PepsiCo, Walmart and Starbucks on Friday confirmed that they have suspended their advertising on YouTube, joining a growing boycott in a sign that big companies doubt Google’s ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos.

The companies pulled their ads after the Wall Street Journal found that Google’s automated programs placed their brands on five videos containing racist content. AT&T, Verizon, Volkswagen and several other companies pulled ads earlier this week.

“The content with which we are being associated is appalling and completely against our company values,” Walmart said in a Friday statement.

Besides suspending their spending on YouTube, Walmart, Pepsi and several other companies have said they will stop buying ads that Google places on more than 2m other third-party websites.

The defections are continuing even after Google apologized for tainting brands and outlined steps to ensure ads don’t appear alongside unsavory videos.

If Google can’t lure back advertisers, it could result in a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue. Most analysts, though, doubt the ad boycott will seriously hurt Google’s corporate parent, Alphabet. Alphabet shares have fallen more than 3% since Monday, closing at $839.65 on Thursday.

Although they have been growing rapidly, YouTube’s ads still only represent a relatively small financial piece of Alphabet, whose revenue totaled $73.5bn last year after subtracting commissions paid to Google’s partners. YouTube accounted for $5.6bn, or nearly 8%, of that total, based on estimates from the research firm eMarketer.

Whether the recent events are a mere blip on the radar for Google or a harbinger of bigger problems to come may depend on whether the company can quickly improve its technical tools to give advertisers more control over where their ads appear.

YouTube has begun reviewing its advertising policies and will take steps to give advertisers more control, Philipp Schindler, Google’s chief business officer, wrote in a blogpost this week. Google also plans to hire more people for its review team and refine its artificial intelligence – a key step, since much of the ad-serving is handled by automation.

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Alphabet, acknowledged in a Fox News interview that ads appearing next to videos promoting hate speech or advocating violence had slipped through the digital cracks in Google’s elaborate ad-serving systems.

“We match ads and the content, but because we source the ads from everywhere, every once in a while somebody gets underneath the algorithm and they put in something that doesn’t match,” Schmidt said. “We’ve had to tighten our policies and actually increase our manual review time and so I think we’re going to be OK.”

But Google’s public statements have done little to assuage advertisers’ fears, said David Cohen, president, North America, for the media buying firm Magna Global.

Even before the most recent revelations about YouTube, control over online ad placement had become a hot-button topic for advertisers. Social networks and news aggregators came under fire during and after the US presidential election for spreading fake news reports, and advertisers have also sought to avoid having their brands appear beside content that they categorize as hate speech.

“Between non-human traffic and fraud, fake news and hate speech, brands are more concerned than ever,” said Marc Goldberg, CEO of Trust Metrics, a New York-based company that addresses ad fraud.

 

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Antifa – Battling the neo-Nazi and alt-right Trolls one Dox at a Time

The Internet war against the Chumph racist trolls is heating up. Antifa, the name Anti-Fascists on the Internet have chosen, are attacking and taking down neo-Nazis where they live.

The article describes these heroes as “far-left”. I am not terribly sure that is an accurate description. You don’t have to be “far-left” to hate neo-Nazis and white supremacists. I suspect the movement is a lot deeper than the authors suspect – and it is just getting started.

There are a lot of ways to take down alt-right trolls which don’t involve any computer hacking skills. Making your voice known and going after the enablers of these scum requires nothing more than complaints to Reddit, Facebook, or Twitter. Boycotting the advertisers of Brietbart has been effective.  Black Folks should be boycotting the conservative site Townhall for it’s promotion of Lawn Jockeys like Uncle Tommy Sewage. Recent ads included Amazon, Sprint, and Medix Select. email, send a snailmail, or call and tell them you find the content offensive and won’t be buying their products. Go after these clown means of making money, and they will go away.

Neo-Nazis Face a New Foe Online and IRL: the Far-Left Antifa

FOR EVERY NEO-NAZI meme, there is an equal but opposite Nazi punch. Think of it as the Third Law of the internet, if Newton was a subreddit.

OK, that’s a little absurdist, but increasingly, it does seem like every upwelling of far-right agitation—in real life or online—gets met with a reciprocal surge from an equally extreme niche on the far left. Somebody punches the white nationalist Richard Spencer in the face in a video that goes viral. Breitbart provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos tries to give a talk at UC Berkeley. Over 150 protestors break windows and throw fireworks at the police until administrators call off the event. And President Trump tweets about it.

The progression isn’t strict call-and-response, to be sure. But it does show that the white nationalist internet has a kind of counterpart. Some of these far-left activists are militant antifascists—“antifa” for short. And not to get all falsely equivalent on you, but many are young, angry, and know their way around a meme.

They may well indeed express more egalitarian ideals than neo-Nazis (who doesn’t, really?), but they’re also anarchists prone to property destruction and online abuse. Worse, by giving as good as they get, they double down on political polarization, driving the national narrative even further from center.

The traditional antifascist playbook pre-dates World War II. Most famously, they employ so-called black bloc tactics, dressing in head-to-toe black and causing chaos. (The antifacist who punched Richard Spencer was a black bloc participant.)

But it’s not all yelling “anarchy” and lighting stuff on fire. They’re also tech savvy. “Since the first white supremacist sites went online, people have been trying to take them down, figure out people’s passwords, and dox them,” says Stanislav Vysotsky, a sociologist and criminologist at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. “Later on, it became DDos attacks.” Anonymous and spinoff groups like LulzFinancial certainly seem to be on Team Antifa, doxxing scores of far-right agitators.

But President Trump’s election has rejiggered the antifa-versus-white-supremacist struggle. “Most of the trolling had been coming from the right,” says Phyllis Gerstenfeld, a criminal justice professor at CSU Stanislaus who has studied extremist groups on the internet. “Suddenly, we see a lot more nasty trolling coming from the left. It’s a reaction to power shifts.” With the right in power, the left is alienated and ready to raise hell.

“Bash the Fash”

And that makes for a huge influx of social media-focused, younger antifascists—a mirror universe of the self-described alt-righters you’d see on Gab. “People see the iconography on social media, download a flier and just call themselves an antifascist,” says Vysotsky. “The internet makes it all very accessible.”

This new guard—taking up the internet-y rallying cry “bash the fash”— are responsible for things like the popular Nazi punching memes that followed the attack on Spencer. They’ve spread beyond antifascist subreddits to the general public.

While it’s easy to see why non-Nazis might find that satisfying—we’ve spoken to Richard Spencer at length—having a laugh at violence is hardly a feel-good moment. “I don’t know that I want punching anyone to be the model of what political action looks like,” says a longtime antifascist activist and participant in the CrimethInc anarchist network who goes by the nickname “A.”

SK—a “university age” antifascist and moderator of the /r/militant subreddit—feels differently. “We just fight fire with fire,” he says. “If they send us Pepes with swastikas, we’ll send them some weird shitty photoshop. The alt-right likes to call it The Meme War.”

That sounds relatively harmless, but the memes on both sides tend toward threats of violence.

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And it doesn’t end with memes. “Members of Neo-Nazi groups occasionally pose as reporters to get information on antifascists so they can target them later,” says another /r/militant mod, whose username is IamSeth (and who required mulitiple encrypted chat apps to be convinced I wasn’t a white supremacist in disguise).

Meanwhile, the Meme War has metastasized to Reddit at large: “/r/antifa was never an antifascist subreddit,” IamSeth says. “It is a honeypot run by members of the Ku Klux Klan.” (I wasn’t able to confirm the Klan connection, but when I reached out to the /r/antifa mods, an individual who goes by diversity_is_racism denied the honeypot claim, but said he or she thinks Richard Spencer is “a good guy.”)

That’s the cost of anonymity—on a subreddit, nobody really knows if you’re antifa or antiantifa. The only way to get an existing subreddit taken down is to show it has become a platform for doxxing—which is allegedly what happened on the /r/altright and /r/alternativeright subreddits earlier this week when they posted links to WeSearchr, for a crowdfunded bounty calling for the doxxing of the antifa activist who punched Spencer. Here’s a screenshot from Gab:

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“I’ve seen antifascists doxxing, but I’ve never participated,” says SK. To antifa activists though, doxxing is justified by their opponent’s behavior, which in their view, is worse. “The alt-right is just online making death treats to people,” SK says. “It does disturb your peace of mind, but I think death threats are kind of gross.”

So the Meme War rolls ever on. According to Vysotsky, it’s already happening: “In Wisconsin, a person put up a Nazi flag, and an antifascist published an address online. But because it was a duplex, the address was incorrect,” he says. “The Latino family living there started receiving threats.”

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Some antifascists aren’t bothered by this kind of collateral damage. “People are going to do stupid shit and make the movement look bad,” SK says. “But if you’re fighting against oppression, even if you don’t recognize yourself as antifascist, you’re still a comrade of mine.”

The risk, as always, is escalation. “The equivalent of black bloc street battles will happen online,” say Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project. “Both sides will use every tool at their disposal to go after the other. Lord knows what they could pull off.” Online, actions earn not equal and opposite reactions but stronger ones— and the dial seems only to turn one way.

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Racist Trump Troll Unmasked As Unemployed 34 Year Old Living Off His Father

Confirming the stereotype that much of the alt-right Trolls are 30 something unemployed, overweight, uneducated  failures living off mommy and daddy, who sit in the basement and spew hate.

Scotish man Colin Robertson has been revealed as the influential racist vlogger behind the ­Millennial Woes blog (Screen cap via Daily Record).

Influential YouTube racist unmasked as unemployed man living with his father

An influential racist YouTuber living in Scotland has been unmasked as an unemployed ex-student who still lives with his father.

The Daily Record has confirmed that a 34-year-old Linlithgow resident named Colin Robertson is the man behind the Millennial Woes YouTube channel, which counts more than 20,000 subscribers and over 2 million video views.

Robertson has become an influential voice within the white nationalist movement, and late last year he gave a speech at the National Policy Institute conference in Washington, D.C., where participants raised their arms in Nazi salutes and shouted, “Hail Trump!”

As the Record notes, Robertson is explicitly a white nationalist, as he believes that white people are the only people who should be allowed to lawfully live in the United Kingdom.

“I just didn’t want loads of black people in my country,” he said in a recent video. “It came down to a racial thing, a racial loyalty. I didn’t want black people, I didn’t want Indians, I didn’t want Chinese, I didn’t want Arabs, I wanted my country for my people.”

Although he has no formal job, the Record says Robertson claims to make enough money to live via ads for his incendiary videos, which he shoots in his father’s bedroom.

 

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Hello Bigot Exposes Anonymous Racist Trolls

On the Internet there are a number of racist trolls. Some are part of a white supremacist group which can usually spotted because they post the “company line”. Trolls most precious weapon is the anonymity. You take that away and they dry up like the weeds they are.

Taking the war to the Trolls

Online bigots beware: ‘Hello Racist’ is going to expose you on the Internet

While social media can be an absolute cesspool — seemingly overpopulated by anonymous trolls spewing their special brand of hatred against anyone who is not like them — there are also those who have no qualms about making bigoted comments under their own names on Twitter or Facebook.

That is where the “Hello Bigot” website comes in, reports the Huffington Post.

With an assist from members of the Hello Racist Facebook community, Hello Bigot shines a light on the racists among us — allowing followers to spread the word via social media of the not-so-secret lives of folks who can’t seem to help themselves when it comes to posting hateful memes and horrific comments.

With a helpful submission button, Hello Bigot followers must provide their own names and other personal information, along with a link to the offending post and screenshots.

Case in point: Danny Clayton of Texas who posted an old black and white photo of “Legal Italian immigrant” children holding American flags, with the comment: “That’s because they are white and have common sense and loved being American citizens not like the n****rs, sandn****rs or wetbacks we have in this country now.”

In an interview with Nancy Laws of HuffPo, the founder of Hello Bigot  — who wishes to remain anonymous — explains why they feel the need to, as they call it: “Expose a racist.”

“There are still so many people and segments of society who are still stuck in a place where, for whatever reason, be it hate, ignorance, how they were raised, where they live, etc., racism is still acceptable behavior. It’s still systematically a part of some people’s cultures, lives, and mindset,” they explained, before adding that those people need to be “confronted with their actions.”

“There are still a surprising number of people who are racist who really shouldn’t be because of who they are and what they do professionally. Who, if they are racist, they have the potential to ruin people’s lives when they let their racial biases and prejudices creep in and affect their professional decisions and judgments in ways that are completely incomprehensible and illegal. And that really shouldn’t happen in today’s society,” the site founder continued. “I’m speaking about people who serve society in roles as police officers, teachers, public officials, doctors, bankers, realtors, judges, CEO’s, and others. It’s very critical information to understand if people filling important roles in society are racist and are making decisions and judgments that affect people of all races.”

Asked how the site can make a difference by “outing” bigoted or racist commentary, the answer was fairly simple.

“I think when some people are confronted and called out about their racism, it actually does change them. They become ashamed and embarrassed. But they learn not to do it again. People learn to be racist. And I like to believe that most people at heart don’t really believe in racism or subscribe to it. They just are because that’s what they learned to do and were never told not to or confronted by anyone to tell them that it’s wrong”

Pressed about their own anonymity, threats and lawsuits came to mind, they explained to Laws.

“Legal threats. Threats of violence. Some are laughable. Some are very real and concerning. To the extent possible, I’d like to keep these threats out of other aspects of my life. Being anonymous allows me do that.”

 
 

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Tamir Rice – Racist Trolls Destroy Comments Section

Coordinated attacks by racist trolls on comments sections aren’t unusual anymore. Here, the Cleveland Newspaper discovers just how damaging to sensible discussion they are…

 

Cleveland paper nixes Tamir Rice comment section: ‘A small army’ couldn’t stop the ‘cesspool’ of racism

The Cleveland Plain Dealer explained this week that it had disabled comments on all of its stories about a 12-year-old black child who was shot by police because “a small army” of administrators could not delete the racist comments fast enough.

In a column on Monday, Chris Quinn, the Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Vice President of Content, said that the paper had hoped that articles about the shooting of Tamir Rice would be “an ideal subject for us to meet one of our chief goals at cleveland.com, hosting community conversations on topics of widespread interest.”

But he noted that comments had been disabled in October because “we don’t fancy our website as a place of hate, and the Tamir Rice story has been a magnet for haters.”

“We enlisted a small army on our staff to monitor the comments and delete any that violated our standards,” Quinn wrote. “The trouble was that we couldn’t keep up. Just about every piece we published about Tamir immediately became a cesspool of hateful, inflammatory or hostile comments.”

“Rather than discuss the facts of the case, many commenters debased the conversation with racist invective. Or they made absurd statements about the clothing and appearance of people involved in the story. Or they attacked each other for having contrasting viewpoints. In many cases, well over half of the comments on Tamir stories broke our rules and had to be deleted.”

Observing that the comments were “overrun as they were by wickedness,” the staff decided to shut down the comment section on stories about Rice.

Quinn pointed out that some had tried to move their “odious comments” to unrelated stories, and that those users’ accounts were deleted.

At the time of publication, Quinn’s column had nearly 1,500 comments, and a number of them had already been removed for violating the paper’s commenting policy.

 

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2015 in The Definition of Racism

 

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Exposing Online Bigots

I think just about everyone who has participated in any public online discussion on the internet has seen the work of racist trolls. Believing they are anonymous, such racist trolls regularly attack black forums. It would seem in Brazil, they have developed a partial solution…

Your Next Racist Tweet Could Go on a Billboard Outside Your House

Spend a little time on Twitter and you’ll quickly find out that for every empowering Black Lives Matter or Hispanic Girls United message posted, anonymous users of the social media platform also churn out plenty of hate—without any repercussions for their name-calling or threats. Back in October, author and economist Umair Haque wrote over at Medium that Twitter is becoming a ghost town owing to the amount of abuse on the platform, “and the fact that the average person can’t do anything about it.”

But perhaps the people who make racist comments on social media could be put on blast through the magic of geotagging. That’s the idea at the heart of “Virtual Racism, Real Consequences,” a Brazilian campaign that posts billboards with offensive online comments in the neighborhood where they were published—potentially squashing the idea that social media platforms such as Twitter or Facebook are an anonymous Wild West of bigoted name-calling.

The campaign was launched this summer by Criola, an Afro-Brazilian civil rights organization, after a black weather reporter in Brazil was the object of severe racial harassment on Facebook. The effort tracks down the geotagged locations of the authors of anonymous comments posted on social media; Criola then purchases space on billboards or on buses nearby. Although the campaign blurs out names and profile pictures, the bigoted postings are exposed for everyone to see.

“Those people think they can sit in the comfort of their homes and do whatever they want on the Internet. We don’t let that happen. They can’t hide from us; we will find them,” Criola’s founder, Jurema Werneck, told BBC Trending.

A 2014 analysis by the U.K.-based think tank Demos of nearly 127,000 English-language tweets written over a nine-day period found that 10,000 tweets with a racial slur are posted daily. While the report’s authors noted that “the overwhelming majority of them are not used in an obviously prejudicial or hateful way,” it’s one thing for black folks to tweet each other the lyrics of a popular rap song that contains the n-word and quite another to be on the receiving end of the hate that some people of color experience on social media (particularly if they are active in social justice work). Shaun King, an activist who is the senior justice writer at the New York Daily News, wroteearlier this month that racial abuse on Twitter is so bad that “I almost need to pray before I use it.”

King wrote that he’s blocked 20,000 people on the platform so far this year owing to the bigoted hate that comes his way. “Racists now post messages on every single hashtag of interest to black folk. Almost always without their real names or faces, racists will use racial slurs in messages to or about people thousands of times per day on Twitter,” he wrote. “It’s so prevalent, so pervasive, that it’s basically impossible to use the service as a person of color and not have to face it down every single day.”

When a person’s identity is known, the consequences for posting offensive comments online can be severe. In 2013, former public relations executive Justine Sacco was axedafter her tweet “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!” went viral. And in October, 20-year-old Erika Escalante was fired from her internship at a health and wellness company in Arizona after she posted an image on Twitter of herself in a cotton field. The caption for the photo: “Our inner n—– came out today.”

Meanwhile, Werneck told BBC Trending that although Brazil has laws against hate speech, they are not always enforced, and some people may be afraid of speaking up. To that end, she hopes the campaign will empower people to expose the abuse they encounter online. And perhaps with their anonymity in doubt, some folks might choose to keep their prejudiced thoughts to themselves.

WOuld work in the US in my view – if the billboards did full exposure.

 

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2015 in The Definition of Racism

 

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How the White Supremacists Punked the Tea Party and Republicans…

And created little monsters like Dylann Root.

This is a great article discussing how the white supremacist type flood the web with lessons learned from a site called 4CHAN.

 

Dylann Roof, 4chan, and the New Online Racism

To understand Dylann Roof’s thinking, he tells us, we have to go back to 2012. To Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman, the moment that Roof writes in his manifesto that he was reborn as a white nationalist. Roof’s inspirations are clear in a way that his psychology is not. They go back further than the Martin case into centuries of American history and, along another path, less clearly marked, to the peak years of a now widespread Internet culture, when a new kind of reactionary sensibility was hatched.

A reactionary, defiantly anti-social politics has been emerging for the last decade. It was well known under the auspices of “trolling” and well hidden by its pretense of trickstersism. It was actually juvenile fascism and vitriolic racism but, because it grinned and operated in cyberspace, it was a sensation when it first appeared less than a decade ago. Excitable theorists, bored journalists and naive political activists looked at its strange, adolescent face and pronounced on its revolutionary potential.

According to the accepted wisdom, trolls were fiercely apolitical pranksters up until they put on Guy Fawkes masks and became the radical progressives known as “Anonymous.” But Anonymous doesn’t have a monopoly on trolling’s political legacy. They are only its nominally left-wing manifestation. Something else has been growing in the online ferment they came out of—something that Anonymous and its supporters want to disown—a politics that is temperamentally of the right, not quite coherent, though Anonymous isn’t always either, but unified by certain passions, a conspiratorial bigotry and anti-black racism above all.

This is another legacy of 4chan, the infamous online message board that spawned trolling culture. It is a different branch of politics than the hackitivism associated with Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring, but its roots are the same. While Anonymous has gotten most of the attention, the trolls they left behind on 4chan have seen their influence spread as well, though without a catch-all name or striking avatar to easily refer to them. You can see this other side of trolling’s inheritance spreading on popular sites like Reddit and in the widespread adoption of the rhetorical style they developed: using bombast and absurdism to hide racist tropes in conceptual riddles.

If Roof was not directly shaped by that Internet culture, he nonetheless moved in the world it helped create.

We know that Dylann Roof had a history of taking drugs and that friends say he had expressed interest in committing a mass shooting, but little else about his psychological state leading up to his massacre. We know from what he told the woman he left alive to explain what he’d done, since he apparently intended to kill himself, and from his manifesto that he believed he had no choice but to murder defenseless black people—he specified defenseless; he wanted a slaughter, not a fight—in service to his white nationalist ideology. And we know where the ideas in Dylann Roof’s manifesto first appeared: almost verbatim on a neo-fascist website inspired by 4chan’s politics.

Back to Trayvon Martin. If there is a single event that sparked the current period of social unrest, the national controversy around race and policing, and the largest protest movement of President Obama’s second term, it is the night in February 2012 when a mixed-race Florida man, alarmed by the presence of an unarmed black teenager in his community, confronted and killed him after a struggle.

The fault line exposed by the killing of Martin is still sending out aftershocks. It inspired the Black Lives Matter movement and its more radical offshoots, including a group that named itself after Martin, despite objections from his family, and became notorious after leading a chant calling for “Dead cops” in New York.

The Martin case, and the mainstream media’s handling of it—marred by bothcasual slanders of Martin and outright distortions about Zimmerman—reverberated in the Internet’s ideological echo chambers, the former inspiring the nascent protest movement that reemerged in Ferguson, the latter inspiring a right-wing counter-movement online.

A story that had started on Twitter before it was picked up by news continued to spread on the populist Internet.

The racial and political divisions revealed by perceptions of Martin’s death and the media’s handling of it attracted activists to the cause. Some organized protests. One anonymous Internet user hacked Martin’s email and social media accounts and posted the results online in an effort to depict him as a thug and drug user, and justify his shooting death. The hacker, who went by the name Klanklannon, posted an edited, slideshow version of the messages stolen from Martin’s accounts. Klanklannon, as the name suggested, was a white supremacist, and a member of 4chan’s political message board, “/pol/,” which is where the hacks were first posted.

“The event that truly awakened me,” Dylann Roof wrote before walking into a church in South Carolina and killing nine of the black parishioners who had invited him into their Bible study group, “was the Trayvon Martin case.”

It’s not all that far from the mainstream of American discourse to the places where Roof dwelled online, but the distances get skewed by perspective.

The organized political groups that inspired Roof, like the Council of Conservative Citizens, have, while courting influence, been considered disreputable for decades. That’s a far cry from the kind of ambivalent, if not adulatory treatment, offered to the avatars of 4chan’s bleeding-edge web culture, who were fêted by academics and journalists even as their much pondered trolling cleared out a space online for a new breed of fascist websites, like the one Roof appears to have visited online.

There’s something immediately familiar about The Daily Stormer, where whole passages from Roof’s manifesto first appeared. Its name is taken from Hitler’s paper of record, the Nazi propaganda organ Der Stürmer. The site owes as much, perhaps more, to the style and mode of political rhetoric developed on the 4chan message board as it does to any tract published by the KKK or American Nazi party. (…the nitty gritty here…)

Now – there is a way to fight this – and I will get more into that over the next few weeks (hopefully). Some people have already started using the trolling method to counter, making most conservative sites even quicker on the trigger to ban liberal folks than usual. You also have to be prepared to be persistent, as in many places where there are racist types working the board – you will get a slew of complaints instantly from the trolling group to try and knock you off almost immediately, for even mild deviance from the racist mantra being spewed. They truly hate it when you blow up one of their racist memes with facts.

Step 1 always is to understand the problem.

 
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Posted by on June 30, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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