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Crossing a Closed Street While a Minority

Austin, Texas…Despite its conversion into a modern Hi-Tech capital, a lot of the old ugly still resides just below the surface…

In this case – being a minority while crossing a closed off street.

WATCH: Mob of Austin cops tackle and assault two unarmed men for jaywalking

A group of friends, Jeremy Kingg, Lou Glen, Matt Wallace, and Rolando Ramiro were walking home Early Friday morning when they crossed the street in a manner unfit for a police state.

“We were walking across the street, the sign said ‘do not walk,’ but lights were already turning yellow and streets were blocked off, so we kept walking,” Ramiro says.

“[Police] flashed their flashlights at us, asked us to show them our IDs. Matt and Jeremy said to f— off,” noting that the street was barricaded so the ‘crime’ of Jaywalking was a moot point when cars are unable to drive down the street.

However, the half-dozen officers attempting to assert their authority over group did not approve of Wallace and Kingg’s tone, so they felt a gang beating was in order.

All of the sudden, multiple Austin cops coming running from their bicycles and proceed to start punching, kneeing, and kicking two young men.

When asked what crime they committed, one officer turned up and said, “crossed against the light.”

This insanely violent response from police for crossing the street is the epitome of the divide in America today that continues to grow between the police and the policed. This is not how you treat people.

After the video began to go viral, the APD released the following statement:

The Austin Police Department has been made aware of the incident that occurred Friday, Nov. 6 at 2:30 a.m. in the 600 block of E. Sixth Street. As is standard protocol, the Chain of Command will review the Response to Resistance and the incident to determine what led up to the events captured in the video and whether the officer’s actions were in compliance with APD policy.”

The APD is no stranger to violent arrests for jaywalking. Last year, 4 APD officers applied a ridiculous amount of force to a tiny college girl for jogging ‘against the light.’

When police were asked to issue a statement about the stop, which made world news, APD chief Art Acevedo implied that the girl should feel lucky that none of his officers raped her.

“This person absolutely took something that was as simple as ‘Austin Police – Stop!’ and decided to do everything you see on that video,” Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo said at a press conference Friday, according to Austin NPR station 90.5 KUT. “And quite frankly she wasn’t charged with resisting. She’s lucky I wasn’t the arresting officer, because I wouldn’t have been as generous. … In other cities there’s cops who are actually committing sexual assaults on duty, so I thank God that this is what passes for a controversy in Austin, Texas,” Acevedo said.

 

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Another Travesty in Texas – Judge Releases Cop From Murder Charge Quoting 1889 Law

It’s like convicting the Klan in Mississippi and Montgomery all over again…

Citing federal immunity, judge tosses manslaughter charge for Texas detective who shot unarmed black man in 2013

On Thursday night, just four days before the former Austin police officer was set to stand trial, a federal judge in Texas dismissed a manslaughter charge against Charles Kleinert in the 2013 shooting death of Larry Jackson Jr., an unarmed black man.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel cites a little known 1889 case that determined federal agents can be granted immunity from state criminal charges and undoes one of a handful of indictments handed down to police officers out of the thousands of fatal police shootings that have occurred in recent years.

Kleinert was one of 54 officers to be charged in connection with a fatal on-duty shooting from 2005 to 2014, according to a Washington Post analysis published earlier this year. So far in 2015, there have been more than 800 fatal on-duty police shootings that have resulted in charges for just five officers, according to a Post database.

Jackson, 32, was shot to death on July 26, 2013, after he visited his local bank.

The bank was on lockdown after a robbery earlier in the day. Austin Police have said that Jackson returned to the bank a second time, when he was confronted by Kleinert, a detective who was investigating the robbery. After a few minutes, Jackson ran.

Kleinert gave chase, commandeering the vehicle of a woman driving in the area.

“(Kleinert) was breathless and agitated and yelled, ‘Go go go’ and ‘follow him’ multiple times,” the woman, Regina Bethune, told KVUE, a local television station, in February. “He seemed very out of control and highly agitated. I was uncertain if he was really a police officer or not. I realize that either way I needed to remain calm and help him try to calm down. He did not identify himself any further once in the car. He did not tell me his name or offer any explanation as to what was going on.”

Kleinert caught up to Jackson underneath a bridge. The officer said he drew his weapon and that during a violent struggle it accidentally discharged, putting a bullet in the back of Jackson’s neck.

On Thursday night, just four days before the former Austin police officer was set to stand trial, a federal judge in Texas dismissed a manslaughter charge against Charles Kleinert in the 2013 shooting death of Larry Jackson Jr., an unarmed black man.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel cites a little known 1889 case that determined federal agents can be granted immunity from state criminal charges and undoes one of a handful of indictments handed down to police officers out of the thousands of fatal police shootings that have occurred in recent years.

Kleinert was one of 54 officers to be charged in connection with a fatal on-duty shooting from 2005 to 2014, according to a Washington Post analysis published earlier this year. So far in 2015, there have been more than 800 fatal on-duty police shootings that have resulted in charges for just five officers, according to a Post database.

Jackson, 32, was shot to death on July 26, 2013, after he visited his local bank.

The bank was on lockdown after a robbery earlier in the day. Austin Police have said that Jackson returned to the bank a second time, when he was confronted by Kleinert, a detective who was investigating the robbery. After a few minutes, Jackson ran.

Kleinert gave chase, commandeering the vehicle of a woman driving in the area.

“(Kleinert) was breathless and agitated and yelled, ‘Go go go’ and ‘follow him’ multiple times,” the woman, Regina Bethune, told KVUE, a local television station, in February. “He seemed very out of control and highly agitated. I was uncertain if he was really a police officer or not. I realize that either way I needed to remain calm and help him try to calm down. He did not identify himself any further once in the car. He did not tell me his name or offer any explanation as to what was going on.”

Kleinert caught up to Jackson underneath a bridge. The officer said he drew his weapon and that during a violent struggle it accidentally discharged, putting a bullet in the back of Jackson’s neck.

Kleinert was indicted on manslaughter charges, with a grand jury concluding that Kleinert “did then and there recklessly cause the death of Larry Jackson by striking and by attempting to strike Larry Jackson with [his] hand while holding a loaded firearm.” But Kleinert’s legal team argued that the shooting was accidental and that, because he was a member of an FBI task force that he was entitled to ‘Supremacy Clause immunity’ — a defense that argues that because the Constitution is the supreme law of the land, a federal officer who at the time reasonably believes his actions were necessary to the performance of his federal duties is immune from state criminal prosecution.

Judge Yeakel agreed, ruling that Kleinert was acting in his federal capacity while investigating the bank robbery and therefore has federal immunity.

The federal immunity defense dates back to an 1889 shooting, in which a U.S. marshal assigned to protect Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field shot and killed a man who had attacked the judge. The Supreme Court ruled that because the officer was acting in his capacity as a federal agent he could not be tried or found guilty of murder.

Kleinert’s attorney argued that while he was an Austin detective, he was also deputized as an FBI agent, and therefore immune from prosecution.

“The court concludes that from the time Kleinert began his conversations with Jackson until the time Jackson died, Kleinert was acting in his capacity as a federal officer,” Yeakel wrote. “At all times, Kleinert was attempting to detain and arrest Jackson for committing federal offenses in Kleinert’s presence — actions that Kleinert was authorized by federal law to perform.”…The rest of this travesty here

 

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Texas the new Mississippi Burning?

Here we go again, with the same Police Department as arrested Sandra Bland on diaphanous reason.

This time the out of control cops taser a City Councilman in his front yard for the crime of coming outside to see what was going on in his front yard.

Texas councilman seen on video being tased by police

A video out of Prairie View, Texas, is raising questions about police use of force. A councilman is seen getting tased while on his knees and with his back to officers. Police say he was resisting arrest.

Jonathan Miller, 26, was on his knees with his hands by his side when he was tased on Thursday night by Prairie View Texas Police.

Before using the taser, police warned the councilman, several times, to put his hands behind his back.

“He’s going to have to tase you because you’re not doing like you’re supposed to,” an officer can be heard saying on camera before tasing him.

“I live here man, I live here,” Miller is heard saying after being tased.

“I told you to back off and you didn’t listen,” said one of the officers.

Officers arrived at the scene to question Miller’s fraternity brothers, who were outside of Miller’s home. Miller came out to ask what was going on.

“I’m not trying to be combative or anything,” Miller told officers before being tased.

“I understand you’re coming in at the tale end of it,” a female officer replied. “I just told you everything is okay. They already explained everything to me.”

But the situation escalated when another officer asked Miller to move away.

“Go over there before you go to jail,” a male officer said to Miller.

Miller just stands and looks at the officer.

He was tased, arrested and spent the night in jail…

Coincidentally, the female officer in the body camera video is the same one who transported Sandra Bland to a county jail after she was arrested in July. Bland made national headlines after authorities say she hanged herself while in jail.

If I were that Councilman, that Police Chief better have a really good car repair shop, and be real comfortable with what he is making now…Because it will be 2050 before he gets any new cars, or a raise.

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Killer Cop in Texas

 

 

Will a killer cop go free in Texas?

ON JULY 26, 2013, Austin, Texas, police detective Charles Kleinert racially profiled Larry Jackson Jr., proceeded to chase him down over a crime he didn’t commit, and shot him in the back of the neck at point-blank range.

Last week, Larry Jackson’s family sat in a courtroom and listened as Kleinert took the witness stand and justified everything he did that day, including killing Jackson. “He showed no remorse,” said Larry’s sister LaKiza Fowler.

The police claim that they encountered Jackson while investigating a robbery earlier that day at the Benchmark Bank building. Jackson attempted to enter the bank, allegedly claiming to be someone else, but was stopped at the locked doors. He tried to run when Kleinert went to question him.

Kleinert, described by a witness as “out of control,” then pursued Jackson, even commandeering a car to catch up to him. When he did, he beat Jackson. Kleinert then placed his gun to the back of Jackson’s neck and pulled the trigger.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

TESTIMONY AT the hearing last week confirmed many of the glaring flaws in the police story that have led Jackson’s family and their supporters to condemn Kleinert and the Austin Police Department (APD) for a racist murder and cover-up.

One witness, who worked at a hospital nearby, was the woman who had her car commandeered by Kleinert. She recounted how Kleinert stopped her, ordered her to unlock her door, got in and frantically yelled to drive down the street toward where Jackson was running. Kleinert was “red in the face” and so “reckless” that she wasn’t sure if he was a police officer, the witness said.

Another witness was David Dolinak, the then-chief medical examiner for Travis County, who reported the findings from Larry’s autopsy. There was a “dark muzzle imprint” around the gunshot wound, according to Dolinak, meaning that Kleinert’s gun was pressed to Larry’s neck when the fatal shot was fired.

Recounting her experiences in court during a panel discussion at the University of Texas at Austin that evening, LaKiza said, “Being in court today and hearing the expert testimony made us realize more how much Larry suffered.”

She and her family have been struggling for justice in this case for more than two years, and she has drawn a conclusion that the audience at the meeting resoundingly agreed with:

The system is unfair. There are clauses in the law to let cops get away with what they do. What you hear in the news is not true. They only give you bits and pieces, and a certain narrative–the police narrative. I want people to see Larry’s humanity. He had three children, a mother, a father, myself, his sister, his only sibling, my daughter, and many other relatives and friends.

This humanity is flatly rejected by the APD and its powerful allies, and has been since day one. The APD stalled for a full day before informing Larry’s mother of his death, even after she filed a missing person’s report. The woman whose car was commandeered expressed similar problems with the department–she attempted three times later that day to report Kleinert’s actions, but the police didn’t take her seriously.

In fact, Austin police were busy getting their story straight and preparing a smear campaign against Larry, joined by the local media and the courts. Kleinert’s lawyers have been attempting to paint Larry as a criminal and Kleinert as the hero cop who was simply carrying out his duties. In court, they pushed the medical examiner to talk about finding traces of PCP during Larry’s autopsy, suggesting that this made him act erratically.

Currently, Kleinert’s lawyers are attempting to get him off on a technicality. He worked on a federal anti-fraud task force at the time of the murder, and duties performed in that role are immune from state prosecution. In court, Kleinert said that he suspected Larry was at the bank to “commit fraud,”, and he thus had probable cause for the chase, justified by his federal duties. Prosecutors pointed out the absurd logic, since Kleinert didn’t even have probable cause to search Larry at the bank, much less chase him down and kill him.

However, LaKiza and other activists involved in the Black Lives Matter movement know the courts work on the basis of power, not logic. It wasn’t until May 2014, almost a full year after the murder, that Kleinert was even indicted. The charge was manslaughter, not murder, and only came after months of rallying and marching–organized the People’s Task Force, a local anti-racist organization–to put pressure on the Travis County district attorney.

Since then, the case has been repeatedly delayed in the courts, and Kleinert’s lawyers have attempted a series of legal maneuvers. The federal immunity claim is the most recent, and could lead to Kleinert going completely free.

 
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Posted by on October 6, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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Sandra Bland Investigation Falling Apart

Looks like the investigation into Sandra Bland’s death  has been derailed….

The Sandra Bland Investigation Is In Trouble

Sandra Bland

On July 13, Sandra Bland, a 28-year-old black woman, was found dead in her jail cell in Waller County, Texas, three days after being arrested over a traffic stop gone wrong. Sheriff Glenn Smith, who oversees the county jail and had been fired from a previous job after allegations of racism and police brutality, promised an all-access, top-to-bottom investigation to uncover what happened to Bland. He set up an “independent” commission to review the sheriff’s department. Smith tapped Paul Looney, a local criminal defense lawyer, to lead the probe and to pick the commission’s other members.

“The whole nation, the whole world is looking at us,” the sheriff said.

But from the beginning, Looney’s investigation was beset by a conflict of interest: His law firm had a financial relationship with Carbett “Trey” Duhon III, Waller County’s top elected official — and the man who’d likely have to write the Bland family a large check out of county funds if that inquiry turned up wrongdoing. (Duhon, who referred clients to Looney in exchange for a monthly retainer, has since severed that relationship.)

Now, despite Waller County officials’ vows, Looney says his panel isn’t looking for possible wrongdoing at all and is simply compiling recommendations that Smith can “throw in the trash” if he chooses.

“I am not looking forward to sharing this information with the Reed-Veal and Sandra Bland family at all,” Cannon Lambert, a Bland family attorney, said when told about Looney’s comments. “I am dreading this conversation. It’s stunning.”

Duhon, for his part, clearly recognizes the value to Waller County of a fair investigation by an untainted commission. “To avoid the appearance of impropriety,” he told The Huffington Post, he asked Looney to serve as a nonvoting member of the six-person panel. Duhon cited worries that “somehow I could influence the outcome of that investigation. That’s the insinuation that people have made.”

Looney agreed not to vote on the panel’s recommendations. He’s still running the probe.

Duhon, who was elected county judge in 2014, is relatively new to Waller County. He moved from suburban Houston a decade ago and started a solo law practice, doing a lot of title insurance work. He also began involving himself in the kinds of local groups and governance boards that ingratiate a new guy with the old guard, such as the chamber of commerce, a toll road authority and a sub-regional planning commission.

When the county judge slot opened up, Duhon won the Republican primary and then a gently contested general election last year. In Texas, a county judge, though properly addressed as “judge,” is not a judicial official. He’s the executive officer of county government and presides over the elected commissioners’ court, which is not a court but the county’s legislative body. In other words, Duhon straddles the executive and legislative branches of local government, much like a mayor who votes with the city council.

With the new job, his law practice got squeezed. “There’s only so many hours in a day,” Duhon said. “The county judge position in Waller County just absolutely requires an incredible amount of time, day in and day out.”

So from June 2015 — a month before Bland’s death — until Sept. 1, Duhon was “of counsel” at Looney & Conrad. What that meant, Duhon explained, is that Looney’s firm paid him a fixed amount each month, and in exchange he passed along potential clients he didn’t have time to help.

Despite his wide network in Waller County, Duhon told HuffPost he is “the anti-good ol’ boy.”

 

“I am not about sheltering elected officials or anyone else,” he said. “If people need to be responsible for their actions, they need to be responsible for their actions. I am not about to sacrifice my integrity for another elected official.”

Duhon wanted to be clear that he is not somehow profiting, or helping others profit, from the independent investigation run by Looney. He pointed out that Looney and the others on the panel are not being paid and that, in any case, the monthly retainer he received from the firm was not tied to its revenues. He also expressed hope that Looney serving as a nonvoting member would alleviate any suspicions about deals among political insiders.

The county judge is likely best-known for two ill-conceived tweets that he sent after Bland’s death. The first referred to “high levels of active THC in her system at time of death.” In the second, Duhon tried to explain why he mentioned Bland’s possible marijuana use by writing, “It goes to her mental state. Also relevant if she was self-medicating for depression.” He quickly deleted his Twitter account.

Concerns about potential conflicts posed by the county judge’s recent relationship with the law firm of the man probing the sheriff’s work cannot be so easily erased, for they go beyond private profit. Duhon writes the county budget, including funding for the jail and the sheriff’s department. (The commissioners’ court then votes on it.) Waller County collects about $1.23 million in fines a year — otherwise known as revenue — thanks in large part to the sheriff’s department. And county funds could take a serious hit, in the form of a settlement with the Bland family, if Looney’s investigation turns up civil rights violations, criminality by government employees or other wrongdoing.

Looney told HuffPost last week that Duhon’s ties to his firm posed no conflict of interest. He also said that their arrangement ended as of Sept. 1 because it was scheduled to run just three months.

Duhon has a slightly different take. He told HuffPost he ended the relationship because of an Aug. 3 advisory opinion from the chair of the ethics committee of the State Bar of Texas’ Judicial Section. Evelyn Keyes, who also sits on an appeals court in the Houston area, indicated that a county judge being of counsel to a law firm did indeed pose a conflict for that firm within that county’s courts.

Whatever the reason, Duhon’s departure seems to resolve the appearance of at least one conflict that hung over the Looney-led commission, leaving it free to uncover malfeasance and root out wrongdoing in the sheriff’s department and the Waller County Jail.

Waller County Courthouse

But that still isn’t what the commission is doing.

“We’re not trying to do an exposé,” Looney told HuffPost. “It’s more in the nature of a consultant report for the sheriff to use as he wants.”

Looney emphasized that his independent commission would make its report public at the same time the findings went to the sheriff — but the sheriff has sole discretion over what to do with the report. “He can read it or not read it,” Looney said. “If he wants to throw the whole thing in the trash can, he can.”

Duhon, who said he’s had no involvement with the panel since asking Looney to be a nonvoting member, had a different impression of its mission. “I was told early on that they would be doing a comprehensive review,” he said. “If that’s changed, that’s not anything I would have any knowledge of.”

According to Looney, the voting members of the commission are taking their jobs seriously and pursuing their review earnestly. “It’s kind of cool to see,” he said, although they are mostly just “observing and taking notes” at this point.

There is no deadline for Looney’s panel to finish its work. Meanwhile, local and outside critics have begun calling on the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate potential civil rights violations in Bland’s case.

Unprompted, Duhon raised the possibility that the federal government could conduct its own inquiry.

“Waller County has been open to that since day one,” said Duhon. “We are OK with the Justice Department. We have never been opposed to that.”

 

 
 

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Story Deepens on Texas Football Players Who Hit Ref

This one has taken a strange twist. Shortly after punishment was announced for the two Texas High Schoolers shown in the shocking video below, one or both of them told the authorities that they had been told to hit the ref by a coach!

Texas coach accused of ordering players to hit referee resigns

Mack Breed, the assistant football coach from John Jay High School in San Antonio, Texas, who is accused of directing two players to target a referee during a game, has resigned, Northside Independent School District Superintendent Brian Woods said Thursday.

Head football coach Gary Gutierrez spoke during the University Interscholastic League hearing, both defending Breed and deriding his “poor judgment call.”

“I love coach Breed. He was on staff already when I became head coach. He is an upstanding man, he is a man of integrity,” Gutierrez said, but “he violated the sanctity of what coaches are” by telling the players to hit a game official.

Breed joined the coaching staff in 2010. He played quarterback at John Jay before attending theUniversity of Missouri, where he played safety. On Thursday, Breed’s lawyer issued the coach’s first public statement on the incident, saying “some people are unfairly blaming one man, Mack Breed, for everything that happened at that game.”

According to Breed’s version of events, after a black John Jay wide receiver was ejected from the game, another black player told Breed that umpire Robert Watts had said to the player, “Throw the f***ing ball at me again, n****r.”

Watts, through his attorneys, has repeatedly denied uttering racial slurs toward the players, says he is considering lawsuits and is urging criminal prosecutions of the assistant coach and the two players.

“As a black male, nothing offended Mack Breed more than being called a racial epithet, except someone in a position of authority calling his players racial epithets. The slur was heard by multiple players, some of whom were not involved in the hit,” Breed’s statement said.

The player that reported hearing the slur was later tossed from the game for throwing a punch even though, according to the statement, a white player on the opposing team had allegedly punched the wide receiver multiple times and avoided ejection.

Describing the atmosphere on the John Jay sideline as “a powder keg,” Breed said that another John Jay coach was penalized for yelling at the officials about the alleged racist comments. Gutierrez also notified the officials about the slurs, according to Breed, but was told the officials wouldn’t use such language.

“Succumbing to the racially charged atmosphere, Coach Breed let his anger get the best of him and he made some regrettable comments. Witnesses can’t agree on what the comments were, but they were interpreted by two players to mean ‘hit the referee.’ The witnesses agree that Breed never explicitly told them to hit the referee, except for Michael Moreno, whose story continues to evolve,” the statement said, referring to one of the two players in question.

Singling out the teen, Breed said “Moreno paints himself as a saint on television” when he was actually “out of control” during the game. Not only did Moreno allegedly allow another player to be ejected for Moreno’s hit on Watts, he flagrantly hit a kneeling quarterback — a no-no in football — on the next play, according to the coach.

“His behavior is exactly what one would expect from a rogue player blaming a coach for the player’s actions,” Breed’s statement said.

Breed concluded his statement by saying he “feels that he could have handled the situation better. For that reason, Mack has submitted his resignation and will move forward taking responsibility for his role in the events that occurred. Mack never intended for the kids to hit or hurt the referee, but the result was the same.”

Jay Downs, an attorney for Watts, took the stand, reiterating another Watts attorney’s assertion that the allegations of racism are false. Watts, who has provided a statement to law enforcement, is suffering from post-concussion syndrome and didn’t attend the hearing, the attorney said. Doctors have yet to clear him to return to refereeing.

News of Breed’s resignation came a day after the players, who intentionally hit an official during a game this month and were suspended from school, attended a disciplinary hearing.

Pascual Gonzalez, a spokesman for the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, said that because Moreno and Victor Rojas are minors, no information about the hearing would be released.

This 1955…or 2015? This racial name calling went on in sports until the late 60’s, when it pretty much ceased due to pressure by the fans, coaches, and leagues who decided not to tolerate it anymore. The only response in the 50’s and early 60’s was to walk away. The coach – in exposing the two boys to punishments is wrong.

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2015 in You Know It's Bad When...

 

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Is Rick Perry and Texas Tea Party a Commie Plant?

Back in 2010, the former Governor of Texas, Rick Perry caused a big kerfuffle about Texas seceding from the union. Could he have been working for the commies in the Kremlin the whole time?

Russia Wants Texas and Puerto Rico to Secede

A sham conference held in Moscow this week was all about getting Western regions to break away.

It’s an open secret that the current Kremlin coterie has an obsession with “sovereignty.” Moscow may push the oddest version of sovereignty in the international arena. Not only was the country the progenitor of the notion of “sovereign democracy”—the ability to entrench autocracy, disguised as democracy, without foreign interference or pushback—but Moscow’s also lobbed recognitions of sovereignty far more frequently than any of its nearest competitors.

Are you a Georgian seaside region tired of Tbilisi’s demands? Are you a forested stretch of eastern Moldova, grating under Chisinau’s Western approach? Are you a landlocked Caucasian enclave, heaving with an independent streak? Then here you are, Abkhazia, Transdnistria, South Ossetia—here’s the recognition you wanted, courtesy of your patrons in Moscow. Here’s the independence, here’s the special status, you desired. Don’t worry about Western opposition, about the Westphalian order propping the decades-long streak of peace. If you want recognition, Moscow can provide it in droves.

Of course, there’s a double standard to Moscow’s call to break away. While these enclaves wishing recognition find a Kremlin ready to help, the sovereignty card becomes unplayable the moment they appear within Russia’s borders.

On Sunday, the Anti-Globalization Movement of Russia hosted the first “Dialog of Nations” conference in Moscow. Seeking to represent the “many small nations that have historical experience of political independence” and who “think about their revival”—and including a shot of shredding the U.S. flag — the conference was helmed by Alexander Ionov, a supporter of Western secession with ties to both a fundamentalistOrthodox party, Rodina, and Russia’s Anti-Maidan movement, a well-spring of pro-Moscow voices seeking to combat anti-Putinist ferment in Russia.

The conference hosted separatists from multiple Western nations—Ireland, Italy, Spain—in addition to a Western Sahara contingent. The greatest plurality of representatives, however, came from the United States. Russia has prior cultivated relations with separatists in Texas—who are currently attempting to land the question of secession on Texas’s GOP ballot—but Ionov and his organization have since expanded their reach among American separatists. (Ionov also lists the UK’s Stop the War Coalition, linked to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, as one of his group’s foremost partners; a representative from Stop the War denied the partnership, saying they have “never had any dealings with it.”)

While the Texas contingent slotted for the conference did not arrive, and while no Native American representatives originally planned ended up showing—although Ionov met with a Native American representative earlier this summer—the meeting saw leaders of independence movements from Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the “Uhuru” black nationalist movements in attendance.…More…

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2015 in Stupid Tea Bagger Tricks

 

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