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Text Book Wars in Texas – Coming to Your Schools

In the School Textbook industry, the State of Texas has out sized influence because books are standardized throughout the state by an appointed Commission. The textbook manufacturers don’t make separate textbooks for every state, they instead make a few standard versions, one based on Texas, which they sell to the nation’s school systems more cheaply than the school systems cost to develop a new book.

Conservative majorities on the Texas Textbook commission the last decade or so have resulted in textbooks following the conservative, and often racist beliefs of the far right.

You get not only the Southern Myth (slaves were well treated and happy), but the introduction of their own perverted “christian” beliefs…And now Mexicans are lazy drunks, and Hispanics are inferior to whites.

Image result for mexican stereotypes

For the complete list in he “textbook” go here.

Texas teachers are rebelling against a new racist textbook that portrays Mexicans as lazy drunks

 

Texas college and high school teachers say a textbook that has been proposed for Mexican-American Studies high school class is chock-full of errors and omissions. If that isn’t enough, it’s also racist.

According to Fusion, Texas State Board of Education member Ruben Cortez Jr. demanded that the board reject the textbook on the basis of the racism but also on the 68 factual errors, 42 interpretive errors and 31 omission errors.

“It is an utter shame we must deal with racially offensive academic work,” said Cortez Jr. at a press conference.

The Texas Tribune cites one passage in the commission report that states, “Stereotypically, Mexicans were viewed as lazy compared to European or American workers … Mexican laborers were not reared to put in a full day’s work so vigorously … It was also traditional to skip work on Mondays, and drinking on the job could be a problem.”

South Texas College history professor Trinidad Gonzales called the book nothing but “a web of racist assertions.”

“It was very difficult to get through it because of the significant errors that kept popping up,” he said. He said that one passage was “anti-Catholic” because it claims that Catholics’ only loyalty is to the Pope.

But Republican board member David Bradley saw racism in the fact that the teachers were bringing up racism to begin with.

“Are we not being a little discriminatory in singling out one group?” he said. “I am French-Irish, and you don’t see the French or the Irish pounding the table wanting special treatment, do you?”

He believes that the course isn’t a required class and schools should be more focused on preparing students for college. Because the course isn’t required, school districts also have an option to choose whatever textbook they want for the class. Still, the members of the commission are hoping to ban the book from being used.

The full report goes line by line through the textbook with examples of attacks on Native people in North, Central and South America being far less “civilized” than Europeans. It claims that Mexicans and Mexican-Americans with “Indian heritage remain skeptical of modern society.”

The book’s racist stereotypes shouldn’t be surprising because the book was crafted by a textbook company run by former school board member Cynthia Dunbar. She is infamous for admitting that during her time on the board she worked to correct a “biblically illiterate society.” Dunbar now works at the right-wing Christian college Liberty University and worked on Ted Cruz’s campaign in Virginia.

She claimed that she tried to work with the commission but was turned away and to this day has only been told of one error in the book. The commission report, however, details all 141 errors and racist citations. She swears that she wants to create objective textbooks.

 

 
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Posted by on September 8, 2016 in American Genocide, The Definition of Racism

 

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White Boys Put Rope Around Neck of Black Girl and Drag Her

This one is unbelievable in today’s world – and even worse, the school is trying to cover it up.

Rope burns on the neck of a 12-year-old girl who was allegedly dragged around by three white boys with a rope (Photo by Levi McCathern)

White boys put rope around black girl’s neck and dragged her while school looked other way: lawsuit

A shocking lawsuit this week alleges that officials at the Live Oak Classical School in Waco, Tx. looked the other way after three white boys put a rope around a 12-year-old black girl’s neck and dragged her around.

WacoTrib.com reports that Levi McCathern, the attorney representing the girl’s family, alleges that the girl was continuously bullied even as school officials downplayed her treatment. The $3 million lawsuit alleges negligence, gross negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress against the school.

The alleged incident took place during a school field trip to the Germer Ranch. The girl was watching some of her fellow students play on a rope swing when she suddenly felt a rope go around her neck. She subsequently slipped and fell to the ground while three white boys pulled on the rope, McCathern alleges.

“It looked like somebody had ripped her neck apart and stitched it back together,” the girl’s mother, Sandy Rougely, told The Dallas Morning News.

For its part, the school has claimed that the entire incident was an accident and the boys were just being playful when they put a rope around the girl’s neck. The Daily Beast flags some recently released emails between Sandy Rougely and school dean Allison Buras that show Buras tried really hard to downplay the seriousness of the incident.

“It sounds like he may have pushed on the back of her leg to make her leg buckle, which is something the kids sometimes do,” Buras wrote in one email. “Rarely is that done out of meanness but more out of a desire for sport.”

 

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Life For DWI

Alcoholism is probably the hardest drug addiction to quit. The alcoholic is surrounded by a culture, which not only imbibes, but considers the consumption of alcohol an integral part of many of our social events.

However – there are some folks who take drinking and bad judgement to an extreme.

Needless to say, this guy won’t be drinking a drop of alcohol, for a very, very long time.

Mr Middleton will not have to worry about what to wear for a very long time.

 

Houston man, 56, gets life in prison for 9th DWI conviction

A 56-year-old Houston man has been sentenced to life in prison following his ninth drunken driving conviction since 1980.

Donald Middleton was sentenced Tuesday in Conroe. A Montgomery County judge decided that Middleton was a habitual offender.

Middleton last week pleaded guilty to the latest DWI charge linked to a May 2015 traffic accident. Investigators say Middleton was arrested after he fled on foot after the wreck, ran to a store and begged the clerks not to turn him in.

Prosecutors say Middleton previously served four prison terms for his alcohol-related convictions.

 
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Posted by on June 8, 2016 in Nawwwwww!, News

 

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Teaching More Than the Three R’s in Texas

Not only do the conservatwerps tweak the textbooks in Texas…They have a propensity to tweak the kids.

Texas on record-setting pace for inappropriate teacher-student relationships

Reports of Texas teachers having inappropriate relationships with students are on track to beat last year’s record total.

The Texas Education Agency reports it has launched 162 investigations of reported inappropriate teacher-student relationships between Sept. 1 and May 31. The Amarillo Globe-News reports that the agency had 188 investigations last fiscal year, marking at least the fifth year of growth in a row.

The issue in Texas shot back into the national spotlight after it was revealed last week that former Houston-area teacher Alexandria Vera, 24, had been impregnated by a then-13-year-old former student.

Court documents allege she was introduced to his family as the boy’s girlfriend, and the woman said that his parents supported the relationship and invited her to family gatherings. She reportedly said she told a school district investigator the family was “very supportive and excited” when she disclosed her pregnancy. She allegedly said she and the boy “love each other.”

According to the probable cause document, she aborted the pregnancy after a child welfare investigator questioned her in February about the relationship, which she denied at the time.

Texas lawmakers could address the topic of such relationships during next year’s legislative session. The state Senate held a hearing on the subject in December, and the Texas House Public Education Committee took similar testimony last month. At the House committee hearing, lawmakers and testimony from experts blamed social media.

 
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Posted by on June 5, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Is the Tide Turing Against the Wild-Eyed Witless Right?

One can only hope this is the proverbial Canary in a Coal Mine for the panderers of PT Barnum conspiracy stories, and salacious lies.

Candidate Who Called Obama a Gay Prostitute Loses Education Board Race

In a stunning comeback, State Board of Education hopeful Keven Ellis won Tuesday’s District 9 Republican primary runoff over Mary Lou Bruner, who drew national attention for social media posts touting far-right conspiracy theories and other fringe views.

The East Texas Tea Party activist and former schoolteacher had been favored to succeed in the race after nearly winning the March 1 primary outright and accumulating heavy support from influential conservative groups that typically hold big sway in low-turnout runoff elections. But Ellis, a Lufkin chiropractor who presides over the local school board, maintained a double-digit lead over Bruner throughout Tuesday night, and that lead widened as vote returns rolled in.

He ended the night 18 points ahead of Bruner, with the final vote showing Ellis hauling in 36,842 votes, 59 percent, to Bruner’s 25,420, according to complete but unofficial returns.

Ellis’ victory all but ensures his ultimate election to the 15-member state panel that reviews and approves textbooks and sets curriculum standards for the state’s more than 5 million public school students. District 9, a 31-county swath spanning northeast Texas, is a deeply conservative Republican stronghold. (Democrat Amanda Rudolph, a Stephen F. Austin State secondary education professor who was unopposed in her primary, will appear on the general election ballot in November.)

The 45-year-old’s win comes after Bruner nearly won a three-way GOP primary race March 1, falling less than 2 percent and a few thousand votes short of the 50 percent mark. (Ellis got 31 percent of the vote.) Her strong showing came despite extensive media coverage of her then-public Facebook posts, one of which said she had heard from a reliable source that President Obama worked as a gay prostitute while in his 20s to fund a drug habit.

With Texas GOP runoffs typically drawing the most conservative voters, Rice University political scientist Mark Jones had previously named the 69-year-old from Mineola a favorite to win the runoff while acknowledging a scenario where educators turned out in droves to vote against her.

“It would appear that a perfect storm occurred to defeat Bruner,” Jones said in an email Tuesday night. “Superintendents and teachers (and their friends and families) across the district rallied against her due to disagreement with her positions on education policy, the belief she would not be a good representative of the district’s interests, and the embarrassment they felt her election would bring to the region.”

Ellis said he felt “really confident that the educators turned out and voted.”

“They saw the importance of this,” he said. “They saw who I was and they saw who my opponent was and they made the right decision.”

Bruner did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Jones also noted the possible impact of a recent decision by an influential Tea Party group, Grassroots America — We the People, to withdraw its previous endorsement of Bruner, who worked in East Texas schools for 36 years, citing inaccurate statements she had made on the campaign trail and an apparent unwillingness to issue a statement correcting them.

In a recent speech to East Texas superintendents, for example, Bruner claimed that half of all public school students were in special education. It was the first time the group has ever rescinded support for a candidate, according to Executive Director JoAnn Fleming.

“Texas escaped an education train wreck tonight,” said Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, a left-leaning group that monitors the State Board of Education. “If Bruner had ultimately won election to the board, she would have instantly become the most embarrassingly uninformed and divisive member on a board that already too often puts politics ahead of making sure our kids get a sound education.”

 

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The Waco Horror, and Its Aftermath

Lynching in the South was a method not only t maintain white supremacy, but to intimidate and blackmail the local minority populations into staying in line. The result of lynchings in the early 1900’s for a lot of the South was the Great Black Migration, and the loss of a large part of their workforce. One of the most violent lynchings was that of Jesse Washington in Waco Texas.

Around sundown of May 8, 1916, Lucy Fryer, the wife of a well regarded cotton farmer, was found bludgeoned to death in the doorway of her seed house. Jesse Washington, who was illiterate and branded “feeble-minded”, confessed to the murder.

Soon after a jury found him guilty, a crowd of 2,000 men seized Washington, chained him, beat him and dragged him to the town square, where he was burned.

His fingers were amputated for souvenirs and his fingernails taken for keepsakes. Finally all that was left was a charred torso, but Washington’s body parts were put in a bag so they could be dragged through downtown.

About 15,000 people, half of Waco’s population, had gathered to watch the lynching.

 

A mob gathers around to watch the lynching of Jesse Washington.

The “Waco Horror” still reverberates, 100 years later

Mary Pearson doesn’t need to be reminded of Jesse Washington’s lynching.

The Robinson resident grew up hearing the stories from her grandmother, a relative of the 17-year-old farmhand who was tortured to death on Waco’s town square a century ago last Sunday. The moral was never precisely stated, but the horror has stuck with Pearson all her 67 years.

Just after the boy received a death sentence for murdering his white employer, a mob seized him and dragged him to City Hall, where they doused him with coal oil and hanged him over a pile of burning wooden crates. They carved his charred body into souvenirs and dragged it around town.

But even more troubling for Pearson was what didn’t happen: Law enforcement didn’t intervene in the lynching, nor did anyone in a crowd of 15,000 spectators.

“All the folks were standing around, most of them were white, and nobody said anything, nobody stood up to try to do anything,” Pearson said in an interview with the Waco Tribune-Herald after a recent proclamation by Waco’s mayor condemning the lynching. “It’s a hurt and frustration even to think about it. … It can cause me a heavy depression.

“Every time I think about it, I get really angry and I have to ask the Lord to help me.”

White Waco spent most of the 20th century trying to forget the atrocity, dubbed the “Waco Horror” by the national press. The incident stood as a turning point in national anti-lynching efforts and helped bring to prominence the NAACP, the nation’s oldest civil rights organization. But the atrocity received no mention in local history books until the late 1960s and was largely ignored or downplayed locally until 1998, when Councilman Lawrence Johnson publicly called for a memorial to “atone” for the lynching.

Meanwhile, the story survived on the frequency of a whisper in corners of the black community, in the form of legends and admonitions to sons and daughters.

Forgetting became impossible in the mid-2000s, when a series of books, exhibits and news articles brought the incident again to national attention. In 2006, the Waco City Council and McLennan County commissioners passed a general condemnation of the area’s lynching past.

The Community Race Relations Coalition and the NAACP have headed an effort to commemorate the centennial this spring with a lecture series, a march and a push to get a state historical marker for the lynching. The observances culminated with a “town hall” meeting at the Bledsoe-Miller Community Center.

The centennial is not meant to reopen old racial wounds or cast blame on anyone now living, said Peaches Henry, a McLennan Community College assistant English professor and president of the Waco NAACP. Rather, it’s an opportunity to bring whites and blacks together to reflect on a difficult shared history.

“Here’s the importance of history: It allows us to remind ourselves of both the good and the bad, and then to correct our course,” she said.

Henry said the city and county resolution against lynching a decade ago was a good start. The question of Washington’s innocence or guilt aside, Henry said city and county leaders failed to uphold the rule of law and were complicit in a heinous crime of torture.

The recent proclamation by Mayor Malcolm Duncan Jr. went further and specifically referred to the “heinous lynching of Jesse Washington.”

“It’s important to call the names of those who were wronged,” Henry said. “The same was true of the woman (Lucy Fryer) who was murdered. She was someone’s mother, sister and cousin. She was also important. For the council to offer a proclamation naming Jesse Washington is very significant. It means that in the public record he is no longer invisible.”

Those involved in the commemorations say burying the past doesn’t keep it from haunting the present.

Scheherazade Perkins, 64, a member of the race relations board, grew up in Waco and graduated from the black A.J. Moore High School in 1969. She never heard of the lynching until she was an adult, but it helped explain anxieties she heard when she was growing up.

“Obviously there is much that has been done, much progress that has been made,” Perkins said. “But there are processes that still go on, an unspoken terror that still exists, that makes people want to stay under the radar. It makes them hesitant to come forward with concerns for fear that they will be not only labeled but mistreated.

“Some of that lingers, not only with the older people who were right on the fringes of the atrocity, but with those who pass the same sentiment down: ‘Boy, you need to watch your mouth, because you never know.’ ”

The centennial comes at a time of national debate and unrest over police killings of unarmed black males, such as Freddie Gray in Baltimore; Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri; and 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland. A Washington Post investigation found that 40 percent of unarmed men shot and killed by police in 2015 were black, even though black men make up only 6 percent of the population.

Henry, the local NAACP president, said she has high regard for Waco police leadership, but she still has anxieties for her own son, an Eagle Scout and college junior, wherever he goes.

“There’s the talk that every young African-American man receives: When you get pulled over, keep your hands on the steering wheel,” she said. “You never make a move without letting the officer know.

“There’s nothing about my son when he is walking or driving down the street that can protect him.”

It’s a more subtle version of the same fear that African-Americans had a century ago, Henry said…Read the Rest Here

 

 
 

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Angry Protesters of Police Killing Chase Mayor From City Council Meeting in Texas

People are getting pissed at this shidt. Another example of an off-duty Police Officer shooting an unarmed suspect.

Protesters in a small Texas town outside Dallas who are upset over the police killing of an unarmed Latino teenager took over a City Council meeting and ended up chasing the mayor away in a police car, WFAA reports.

The protests started in Farmers Branch on Tuesday night with just a single girl holding a sign, but protesters then started rolling in via buses. The meeting ended with about 200 people chanting the name of the slain teen, Jose Cruz, and forcing Mayor Bob Phelps to adjourn the meeting.

Farmers Branch police officer Ken Johnson was arrested and charged with murder for shooting and killing Cruz, who was 16, in March. Johnson was off-duty and not in uniform. Cruz was with a friend, Edgar Rodriguez, and Johnson had accused them of breaking into his car outside his home.

Rodriguez, who was injured in the shooting, said Johnson never identified himself.

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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