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Best Educated Janitors…

Fresh on news that there are 21 million Americans out of work – there is the question of the undremployed–

Why Did 17 Million Students Go to College?

Two sets of information were presented to me in the last 24 hours that have dramatically reinforced my feeling that diminishing returns have set in to investments in higher education, with increasing evidence suggesting that we are in one respect “overinvesting” in the field. First, following up on information provided by former student Douglas Himes at the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), my sidekick Chris Matgouranis showed me the table reproduced below (And for more see this).

Over 317,000 waiters and waitresses have college degrees (over 8,000 of them have doctoral or professional degrees), along with over 80,000 bartenders, and over 18,000parking lot attendants. All told, some 17,000,000 Americans with college degrees are doing jobs that the BLS says require less than the skill levels associated with a bachelor’s degree.

Now I’ve said for a while that one the the great myths of the new depression is the existence of high tech jobs needing high education. At this point there are millions of college educated out of work or substantially underemployed. You cannot fix the roots of the current economic malaise by by generating more job seekers – no matter how well educated or qualified. The brutal fact is, very little of our current economy is actually dependent on new technology. Think of it this way – the leading cell phone platform is dependent on thinking and aa technology concept first developed in Xerox Labs in the 70’s. Very little of the development today of “new technology” is actually “development’ = it is actually execution against old technology. So if you trin them – what would this new legion of scientists and engineers do?

And there is the crux of the problem.

 
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Posted by on January 8, 2012 in Great American Rip-Off, The Post-Racial Life

 

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A Faster Internet?

I see MIT has finally caught up with some of the work being done in the late 90’s on Flow Switching, a technology variant of optical switching.  These are not “routers” as described in the article, neither can the be made to operate utilizing the current TCP/IP variants in the Internet today as anything except “passengers” within the core structure.

I don’t believe PC speed drives this. The reason is the software overhead of bloated functions is the principal consumer of processor power in consumer PCs – not network functions. Nor does file size drive the need. What drives it is the evolution of personal and home “cloud” type computing wherein you have clusters of smart, and not smart devices performing various functions in the home and business which interact with each other and data sources on the internet. Instead of 1 or 2 computing devices per person, you evolve to 10 or 12.

Fascinating though…

MIT Researchers Promise an Internet That’s 100x Faster and Cheaper

MIT researchers have developed technology that they say not only will make the Internet 100 to 1,000 times faster, but also could make high-speed data access a lot cheaper.

The trick to such dramatic performance gains lies within routers that direct traffic on the Internet, according toVincent Chan , an electrical engineering and computer science professor at MIT, who led the research team. Chan told Computerworld that replacing electrical signals inside the routers with faster optical signals would make the Internet 100, if not 1,000 times faster, while also reducing the amount of energy it consumes.

What would the Internet be like if it ran that much faster?

Today, a user who has a hard time downloading a 100MB file would be able to easily send a 10GB file, with the Internet running 100 times faster, according to Chan.

“We’re looking to the future when computer processors are much more powerful and we have much bigger downloads and applications,” Chan said. “When we get more powerful processors, people will be clamoring for more speed. The question is, can these new processors and their powerful applications be supported over the Internet? Everyone will be using more high-rate applications, like 3D, interactive games, high-speed financial trading.”

And when that happens, Chan said users of those large applications will run intochoke points on the Internet. And that could happen as soon as 16-core processorshit the market, if not sooner. “I think the Internet will not be fast enough within three to five years,” he added.

The answer, he said, is optical fibers, which carry light pulses.

Optical fibers are used widely on the Internet, spanning great distances and even continents. While they transmit information more efficiently than electrical signals, optical signals are complicated to deal with. A router, for instance, has problems handling optical signals coming from different directions at the same time. To get around that problem, routers on the Internet generally take in optical signals and convert them to electrical signals so they can be stored in memory until they can be processed, said MIT’s report. After that, the electrical signals are converted back to optical signals so they can be sent back out.

That process eats up chunks of time and energy. Chan and his team have developed technology that would eliminate the need for such conversions.

Chan’s architecture, which is called “flow switching,” establishes a dedicated path across the network between locations that exchange large volumes of data — from Silicon Valley to Boston, for instance. MIT explained that routers along that path would only accept signals coming from one direction and send them off in only one direction. Since the optical signals aren’t coming from different directions, there’s no need to convert them to electrical signals for storage in memory.

“If this can truly jack up Internet data speeds by 100 times, that would have a huge impact on the usability of the Net,” said Dan Olds, an analyst at Gabriel Consulting Group Inc. “We’d see the era of 3D computing and fully immersive Internet experiences come much sooner…. If this turns out to be practical, it could be a very big step forward.”

Dealing with network bottlenecks would be a huge accomplishment, said Rob Enderle, principal analyst at Enderle Group.

“Right now, the network is the bottleneck for hosted computing. This change could transform the industry as we know it,” said Enderle. “We are going to need a faster Internet. We need it now. Currently, we only have about 20% [of available bandwidth] in many places.”

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2010 in News

 

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