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Kid Invents Machine to Save Kids in Hot Cars!

What I’m talking about!

This 11 year old from Texas is one sharp cookie!

Brilliant new device could save kids from hot car deaths — and it was invented by this 11-year-old

An 11-year-old boy in McKinney, TX has produced a prototype of a device designed to prevent the deaths of children in hot cars.

According to CBS News, Bishop Curry was inspired to invent the device after seeing a TV news report about the death of a 6-month-old baby who was left unattended in a hot car in Curry’s neighborhood.

“It made him sad, and at that point, the wheels started turning in his mind,” said Bishop’s father, Bishop Curry IV, to CBS. “He came up with a way to prevent it from happening.”

The father said that he came home from work one day to be greeted by his son waving a piece of paper saying he’d invented something called “Oasis.”

“When he showed me that sketch I was so proud of him for thinking of a solution,” Curry said. “We always just complain about things and rarely offer solutions.”

The boy created an internal cooling system with a fan mounted either on a front or rear headrest. Oasis uses GPS technology to detect when the vehicle has come to a stop and begins to monitor the air temperature. If it reaches a certain point, the fan turns on, blowing cool air on the child in their car seat.

Bishop the younger wasn’t content to stop there, however, Oasis also sends a signal to the child’s parents via WiFi and if they do not respond promptly, the device calls for help, sending the child’s location to authorities.

CBS said, “With help from a GoFundMe campaign that has raised nearly $40,000 since it launched back in January, Bishop was able to get a provisional patent and build a 3-D model of the device.”

Bishop Curry the father works for Toyota. He showed the device to his employers and they were impressed enough to send father and son to the Center for Child Injury Prevention Conference, where they presented the prototype for consideration by manufacturers.

The safety organization Kids and Cars says an average of 37 children die each year in hot cars. Texas is the No. 1 U.S. state for child hot car deaths with 121 children dying from heat-related illnesses after being left in cars since 1990.

Last week, a 25-year-old Texas woman was arrested and jailed after her 2-year-old daughter and infant son died from being locked in a hot car “to teach them a lesson.”

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2017 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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Academic Steering and Black Students

The median pay for a person in my business with (and sometimes without) a Bachelors in Computer Science or Information Technology and with a Manufacturer certification such as a JCIE/CCIE, or a cyber-security cert such as a CISSP is $120,000- $140,000 a year. No PhD required.

So WTF are you taking a degree track in basket weaving?

That same sort of math applies across several STEM based fields, including the Medical Technology industry, Chemical Engineering, some Aerospace, and other Hi-Tech areas. And yes – you have to work your ass off to get there unless you are one of those natural-born geniuses.

So tell me again, why are you enrolled in a under-graduate program where the salary average is 1/3 of that. Despite the “Diversity problems” on the left coast, there are literally tens of thousands of other jobs in the rest of the country.

About 10 percent of black computer science professors and Ph.D. students nationwide are at Clemson, thanks in large part to the work of one professor. Click pic to link.

 

How US academia steers black students out of science

When the late Justice Antonin Scalia pointed out last year that “it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas [Austin] where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less-advanced school, a less — a slower-track school where they do well,” he was roundly criticized by the left as a racist.

He was alluding, of course, to the “mismatch” problem that occurs when black students who are less qualified are admitted to more selective schools but do not graduate or do well at them as a result. Two recent studies, though, suggest that his words are truer now than ever.

The first comes from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, which found that black students are less likely to pursue lucrative majors than their white peers. According to the report, “African Americans account for only 8 percent of general engineering majors, 7 percent of mathematics majors, and only 5 percent of computer engineering majors.”

But they’re overrepresented in fields that don’t have high salaries: “21 percent in health and medical administrative services, compared to only 6 percent in the higher-earning detailed major of pharmacy, pharmaceutical sciences, and administration.”

Finally, it noted, “They are also highly represented in . . . [the low-paying fields of] human services and community organization (20%) and social work (19%).”

“There’s a huge inadequacy here in counseling,” Anthony Carnevale, director of the center and the lead author of the report, told the Atlantic.

This seems pretty unlikely. Who doesn’t realize computer engineers get paid well? The real problem is that too many black students are getting a hopelessly inadequate K-12 education and by the time they get to college, their best bet is to major in a subject whose exams have no wrong answers and whose professors engage in rampant grade inflation.

Carnevale also argues that’s because blacks are concentrated in open-access schools that have fewer choices of majors. But this, too, is questionable. Plenty of open-access universities offer courses and majors in STEM fields.

The implication is that black students at lower-tier universities are actually less likely to graduate in STEM majors than those at higher-tier ones. Which is patently false. Indeed, the historically black colleges and universities, many of which aren’t selective at all, tend to have among the highest rates of graduating STEM majors.

And if you want to get a job in a lucrative STEM field, your chances of completing your degree are much better at a lower-tier school. But here’s the real kicker: A recent survey by the Wall Street Journal found that in “fields like science, technology, engineering and math, it largely doesn’t matter whether students go to a prestigious, expensive school or a low-priced one — expected earnings turn out the same.”

For instance, if you go to Manhattan College, where the average SAT score is around 1620, and major in engineering, your mid-career median pay will be $140,000. If you go to Rice, where the average SAT score is 2180, and major in engineering, your pay will be $145,000.

In other words, there’s not much upside financially to going to the more elite schools. But there is a huge downside: Your chances of graduating with a degree in that major fall dramatically.

If you want to know why there’s still a big salary difference for kids majoring in humanities and social sciences between elite and non-elite schools, it probably has something to do with the substance of the major.

Since most employers have no idea what you learned in your sociology classes, they’ll just assume the kids who went to Harvard are smarter.

But they’ll know exactly what you learned in your math and science classes and so they’ll compensate you well if you did reasonably well no matter where you took them.

If liberal elites really were concerned about increasing the graduation rates and career earnings of minority students, they would realize that the Ivy League is not the answer.

And forget Scalia’s racism about elite schools (UT Austin ain’t an “elite school” on the level of MIT, Stanford, or Cal Tech – although it is a good school). Nobody gives a good damn about your GPA 3 years after you graduate – they care about “what can you do for me”. While graduation from an elite school gets you a higher starting salary, which really doesn’t disappear until late career (HR in many companies never corrects that fact, leading to higher turnover of top performers from “lesser schools” and can’t figure out why their best programmer Jimmy with a degree from Downstate U quit to take a new job, while Wilberforce form Big-Name U, an average performer, stays ) – you are still making money putting you in the top 2-3% of wage earners in the US. The folks that failed at that math are generally working in HR at less than half that – and all too often don’t have a clue.

 
 

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Women in the STEM Disciplines

As a guy who has a daughter pursuing advanced degrees in one of the Science-Technology-Engineering-Math (STEM) fields, and having spent most of my professional career in Hi-Tech – I can appreciate this one from a male Mechanical Engineering student, Jared Mauldin, at Eastern Washington University, which was published in the school paper…

 

Black females (as well as black males) also face the additional burden of race, and low expectations, in terms of academic performance and ability. Good to see recognition of some of this.

 

 
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Posted by on October 9, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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The “Problem” In America Isn’t Immigrants…It’s Guest Workers

 

Been saying this for a while… “Illegal Immigration” isn’t causing a problem with jobs in America. And the conservative types who want to say that Miguel the Farm worker is stealing “back jobs” are full of crap.

Who’s stealing millions of American jobs are “guest workers” using H1 Visas. Now – to my lone conservative reader, that doesn’t mean run out and hang Iqbal in effigy from the nearest lamp post. (It isn’t Iqbal’s fault. Somebody wants to pay me the equivalent of half million a year to go to India to do what I do… I can develop one hell of a taste for curry.)  The people you ought to be hanging (and not just in effigy) have very “American” names and are at the head of the tech companies.

With 3 million black kids currently in college, a historical high – many of these kids are taking courses and earning degrees in the STEM fields. Specifically in Telecommunications and Computer Science. Several studies including the seminal “The Shape of the River” have pointed out that black kids have a harder time achieving a Bachelors than white or Asian kids – but once they do they are about 3.5 times more likely than their white American counterparts to pursue post gradate degrees. Indeed, this has been the motivation by conservatives, and the SCUMUS 5 to try and close that door to higher education through re-instituting Jim Crow in College acceptance by destroying any program where disadvantaged minority kids might get into college even distantly under the banner of Affirmative Action.

Grabbing a bowl of popcorn and a beer, and rolling up in front of the big screen each night to see recounts of the daily carnage in the inner city, as those kids kill each other over nickels and dimes is far more gratifying to conservative’s racism than potentially seeing any of those minority kids join the American commerce as productive members or business owners. It isn’t just having a black President as “the boss” thats sends those folks into racial apoplexy – they have the same reaction to black business folks in leadership positions. As such, the “program” to keep those young folks from getting an education is a Crusade on the 12th Century model of throwing the Muslims out of Jerusalem.

But it isn’t only educated and skilled black folks who are getting screwed here…

The Bogus High-Tech Worker Shortage: How Guest Workers Lower US Wages

Salzman, Lowell and Kuehn: When Bill Clinton was president, wages for American IT workers were climbing and American students were clamoring to become computer scientists. Fifteen years later, average real IT wages are no higher. It is no coincidence that high-tech industries are now using guest workers to fill two-thirds of new IT jobs.

And now they’re asking Congress to provide them with an even greater supply of guest workers — a supply that by the IT industry’s own estimates would equal 150 percent of the expected number of new IT jobs each and every year going forward. With its passage of the comprehensive immigration reform bill, the Senate has complied, putting out a sign for IT jobs that says, “We prefer guest workers.”

The IT industry and its many supporters argue that without this infusion of guest workers it will starve because of the scarcity of domestic native and foreign-born citizens with the right aptitude or interest. Researchers like us, who have the temerity to suggest that the evidence fails to justify importing ever more guest workers, are accused of being anti-immigrant, anti-capitalist, Luddites, or just plain troglodytes who can’t fathom the character of modern technology industries.

For those of us who simply want to get the policy right, however, this is a debate about America’s policies for creating good jobs, strong technology and an innovation-based economy. We welcome immigrants and support an immigration policy that draws the best and the brightest and provides opportunity to newcomers. But policy should not be about targeting government giveaways to a few industries by supplying ever more guest workers when there is an ample domestic supply of qualified graduates and workers.

We’re Already Generating More Qualified Students Than Jobs

Our analysis of the data finds that high-skill guest worker programs supply the preponderance of all new hires for the IT industry. The inflow of guest workers is equal to half of all IT hires each year and fully two-thirds of annual hires of workers younger than 30.

Can it be a coincidence that wages in IT jobs have been stagnant for over a decade? The chart below shows trends for programmer and system analyst jobs; wages for other IT occupations follow similar trends.

In the above graph of average salaries and unemployment rates for computer and IT occupations from 1992-2011, wages for IT workers have held steady over the past decade. This table is reproduced from “Guestworkers In The High-Skill U.S. Labor Market: An Analysis of Supply, Employment, and Wage Trends” (2013) by Salzman, Kuehn and Lowell.

 

At the same time, U.S. colleges are graduating more than twice as many science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) graduates than the number of STEM openings generated by our economy each year. In short, there is little justification to support the escalating numbers of new guest workers called for in the Senate’s S744 legislation.Why then did it pass?

Today’s guest worker programs target an important industry with a substantial hold on the public’s imagination. But guest worker programs should be justified by national interests, not by the shortsighted interests of a particular industry. Proclaiming “shortages” where there is no evidence of them is not only disingenuous, it obscures the likely impact of large-scale guest worker programs, which stand to hurt all STEM grads, but especially minorities who are underrepresented in high-tech, as well as other foreign-born workers who compete most with newcomers. Can anyone argue that prioritizing access to good employment for high-skill domestic workers is not in the national interest?

Isn’t Ours a Market Economy?

Markets are supposed to reflect demand through the price mechanism. In the case of labor, the “price” is wages. How can it be, then, that if the IT industry is experiencing labor shortages, wage levels in this highly profitable industry are no higher than they were in the last millennium? How can an industry expect to attract the best workers without raising wages? Is there what economists call a “market failure” here?

Or is the hidden truth quite simply that large supplies of guest workers allow many firms to swap out higher-paid, high-skill domestic workers for lower-paid, high-skill guest workers? A recent analysis by the Brookings Institution observes that “it is likely that the extra supply of foreign-born workers does bring downward pressure on the wages of incumbent workers, as research suggests.”

All the evidence suggests the IT labor market is still bound by the usual dynamics of supply and demand. When we look at the trends of the past 20 years, we see that when wages increase, the number of computer science graduates increases. When wages fall, the number of graduates falls. When the supply of guest workers increases, wages stay flat, and too many domestic students must find employment in other fields.

Some commentators argue that this last result is good for the economy: science and engineering skills are now being used in millions of non-STEM jobs. But an alternative view is that far too many domestic STEM graduates are in jobs that do not fully use their education, which represents a loss of our greatest source of innovators.

Yes, employers claim they have thousands of unfilled job openings, but the evidence is hardly compelling. Only about half of engineering graduates find engineering jobs, down from previous rates of about two-thirds before the current recession began in 2007. At the largest IT jobs website DICE.com, over half of the advertisements are for contract, short-term and part-time jobs — assuming these jobs exist at all. (A recent Making Sen$e story suggested they well may not.) But even if they are available, these are not the types of jobs that U.S. graduates will find attractive, nor are they the types of jobs that will allow these graduates to pay off student loans, much less enter the middle class….(…more…)

 

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2013 in American Genocide, The Post-Racial Life

 

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Moss Hollow – STEM Summer Camp for Girls

 

‘Bout time. As the father of a daughter who is degreeing in the Bio-Tech field, I am aware of the shortage of women in these fields…

And the shortage of Americans in the STEM fields nation wide.

Maybe the coming generation of girls can save us from becoming a Third Rate, Third world nation.

At Moss Hollow, a tasty start to a space race

The way Darrian Loganexplained it to the 20 or so 7- to 11-year-old girls seated around four tables in a summer camp dining hall, the future of American space travel rested on their little shoulders.

“NASA gave us a little project to do,” Darrian said. “In a few years, they need people like you ladies to build rockets for them.”

Then he and his fellow Camp Moss Hollow staffer Evan Simmons put a bowl of marshmallows and a pile of uncooked spaghetti at each table.

The link to rockets may not have been obvious, but this was part of a new class at Moss Hollow. It’s part of an effort by NASA’s education office to teach STEM concepts — science, technology, engineering and math — in interesting ways. Earlier this year, representatives from the space agency taught the curriculum to camp staffers. Other lessons include making paper airplanes and building tiny cardboard cars propelled by balloons.

This afternoon’s assignment: the Leaning Tower of Pasta. The girls of the Boxwood cabins had to work in teams to design and construct spaghetti-marshmallow towers capable of holding a Ping-Pong ball. If the Ping-Pong ball was safely cradled, a highlighter and then a pair of scissors would be added to see if the towers could stand the strain.

“And, yes, you can eat the marshmallows,” Darrian said. “At the end of the exercise.”

I don’t know what motivates NASA engineers, but marshmallows seem to work with 7-year-old girls.

“Let’s make a castle,” one camper shouted.

“Who wants to make a rectangle?” asked another.

“How many corners does a rectangle have?” asked counselor Rani Lewinson.

The girls from her cabin — Boxwood 3 — decided that a rectangle has four sides and proceeded to sketch out their design on construction paper. It was a basic cube, with a marshmallow at each corner and spaghetti struts in between.

The girls of Boxwood 1 went for something more pyramidal in shape. The girls from Boxwood 4 had an organic shape, semi-pentagonal. It looked a bit like a model of a newly discovered molecule: marshmallonium, perhaps.

Boxwood 2 started out with a wall — tall and narrowly horizontal — until the girls realized it wouldn’t stand up on its own and disassembled it to make something a little more sturdy.

Marshmallows were precious — there was a finite supply — but the spaghetti seemed endless. A lot of measure-once-and-cut-twice was going on as lengths of pasta were snapped in half or quartered, only to discover that they were now too small.

The girls had 12 minutes to construct their towers. When they were done, they admired their sticky handiwork. None of the creations were particularly soaring. Saturn V’s they were not. But they didn’t have to be graceful. They only had to work…

 

 
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Posted by on July 18, 2013 in The Post-Racial Life, Women

 

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