RSS

Tag Archives: Sanders

Donna Brazile Exposes DNC

The DNC operated as a financial arm of the Hillary Campaign. And rigged the Primary against Bernie.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 3, 2017 in High Crimes, Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Bernie? Chicken Drumph!

Trump is too much of a coward to debate Bernie…

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 28, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , ,

Bernie to Debate Trump?

This could be fun. The Political whatnots and talking heads think this is a bad idea. I disagree. While Bernie is still in the race, I think he is in it more for the soul of the Democrat Party  to win the nomination at this point. Polls have consistently shown that a significant portion of Trump’s support would shift to Sanders should Trump be out of the race. Then again…Bernie may score a knockout.

Sanders camp on Trump debate: ‘We want this to happen’

The suggestion that Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump debate in California before the June 7 primaries would appear to be more than just a late-night joke.

“We want this to happen,” Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs told POLITICO on Thursday, when asked if the campaign would reach out to its counterpart, hours after Trump said on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” he would be willing to debate the Democratic candidate if the proceeds from the event went to charity.

Within minutes of Trump’s remarks, Sanders tweeted, “Game on. I look forward to debating Donald Trump in California before the June 7 primary.”

Trump spokeswoman Hope Hicks did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but senior adviser Sarah Huckabee Sanders told MSNBC that the prospect of the debate “just goes to show that Donald Trump is not afraid of Bernie Sanders nearly as much as Hillary Clinton is who refuses to debate Bernie.”

“If she can’t handle the guys in her own party, how do we expect her to take on foreign leaders that are probably much more aggressive than Bernie Sanders,” Huckabee Sanders added. “Whether it happens or not, I think we’re all waiting to see about that. But Donald Trump certainly is happy to debate Bernie Sanders, I think, at any point.”

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Democrat Primary, The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sanders Hits Electorate Issue With Clinton Dead Center

Bernie Sanders just laid out the reason many Progressives are hesitant to support Hillary Clinton. It is in no way that she isn’t qualified, However it is that “conservative” Democrat and connections to Wall Street thing.

Bernie Sanders: ‘Something Is Clearly Lacking’ In Hillary Clinton’s Judgment

“I have my doubts about what kind of president she would make.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders on Sunday questioned rival Hillary Clinton’s temperament for the highest office in the land.

In an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” the Vermont senator clarified his criticism of the former secretary of state last week, in which he said she isn’t “qualified” for the White House.

“The point that I was making, which is absolutely correct, is that if you look at where she is getting the money from Wall Street, another powerful special interest, she voted for the war, she cited Henry Kissinger, in a sense, as a model for her,” Sanders said. “I think those issues will tell the American people that in many respects, she may have the experience to be president of the United States. No one can argue that. But in terms of her judgment, something is clearly lacking.”

In a separate interview that aired Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Sanders again took a swipe at Clinton and her qualifications as president.

“I have my doubts about what kind of president she would make,” he said.

The two candidates jockeying for the Democratic presidential nomination both spent the weekend campaigning in New York, which holds its primary contest on April 19. According to a Fox News poll released Sunday, Clinton leads Sanders 53 percent to 37 percent in the state.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on April 10, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , ,

Sander Wins Big in Wisconsin, Cruz Takes Trump Down

Sanders has won the last 8 primaries. There is trouble in Clintonland.

Trumps mouth has finally got the best of him.

Wisconsin

Presidential Primaries, April 5, 2016

Democratic

92.1% Reporting

Delegates Allocated: 81/96

Delegates

Winner B. Sanders 56.3% 45
H. Clinton 43.4% 36
M. O’Malley 0.2%
Uninstructed 0.1%
Republican

92.1% Reporting

Delegates Allocated: 36/42

Delegates

Winner T. Cruz 48.5% 33
D. Trump 34.9% 3
J. Kasich 14.1%
M. Rubio 0.9%
B. Carson 0.5%
J. Bush 0.3%
R. Paul 0.2%
Uninstructed 0.2%
M. Huckabee 0.1%
C. Christie 0.1%
C. Fiorina 0.1%
R. Santorum 0.0%
J. Gilmore 0.0%
Updated: 4/6/16 12:51 AM ET | Source: AP

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 6, 2016 in Democrat Primary, The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , ,

Free Hug Project – Sanders/Trump Rallies

What sort of people attend Trump and Sanders events?

How do the attendees handle social contact?

Ken Nwadike started his “Free Hugs” campaign after the terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon. The response was both warm and amazing and made the National News.

This year he attended both Sanders and Trump events…The differences in response were amazing and say a lot about the people who support each candidate.

 

 
 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sanders Wins Big in Idaho, Washington, and Alaska

Bernie Sanders has won big in 3 of the 4 States voting in the Democratic Primary this weekend. He also may well take Hawaii, making it a sweep this week.

Bernie Sanders Wins Washington State and Alaska; Hawaii Democrats Are Also Voting

Senator Bernie Sanders handily defeated Hillary Clinton on Saturday in theWashington State and Alaska caucuses, infusing his underdog campaign with critical momentum and bolstering his argument that the race for the Democratic nomination is not a foregone conclusion.

Mr. Sanders found a welcome tableau in the largely white and liberal electorates of the Pacific Northwest, where just days after routing Mrs. Clinton in Idaho he repeated the feat in Washington. With a handful of precincts still reporting, he was leading Mrs. Clinton by more than 40 percentage points. He performed even better in Alaska, winning 82 percent of the vote.

Washington, with 101 delegates in play, was a vital state for Mr. Sanders, whose prospects of capturing the nomination dimmed after double-digit losses to Mrs. Clinton across the South and weak showings in delegate-rich Ohio, Florida and North Carolina this month.

At a rally in Madison, Wis., late Saturday afternoon, Mr. Sanders assured more than 8,000 supporters that his victories had cleared a viable path to the nomination. “We knew from Day 1 that politically we were going to have a hard time in the Deep South,” Mr. Sanders said. “But we knew things were going to improve when we headed west.”

oting the “huge” voter turnout — in Washington, Democratic Party officials estimated more than 200,000 people participated on Saturday, close to the record set in 2008 — he told the crowd, “We are making significant inroads into Secretary Clinton’s lead.”

The victories in Washington and Alaska, which awarded 16 delegates on Saturday, slightly narrow the gulf with Mrs. Clinton in the quest for the 2,382 delegates needed to clinch the Democratic nomination. As of Saturday evening, Mrs. Clinton had roughly 280 more so-called pledged delegates, who are awarded based on voting, and 440 more superdelegates — party leaders and elected officials — than Mr. Sanders.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 27, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The HBCU As a Campaign Tool

Neither Bernie or Hillary has much of a depth of understanding about HBCUs. On the good side, HBCUs graduate a outsized number of black students in the STEM Fields. The bad news, is the bulk of those graduates actually only come from 3 schools. The worse news is that in all but the elite 3 HBCUs, the graduation rate is equal to or worse than that of even modest non-HBCU Schools.

If they really cared…or understood – what I think should be done is to finance the top 10 producing schools in terms of graduation rate. Give them the funding, grants, student of merchant loans to develop or expand curricula in the fields the country needs, and some mandates to reach certain goals such as graduation rate, acceptance to post-grad studies rates, and numbers enrolled in specific programs such as the STEM fields.

Governor Terry McAliffe of my state recently tried to attract high tech into the Norfolk area of the state by offering state incentives o Va Tech, Christopher Newport University, and UVa blindingly missing the fact that Norfolk is 53% minority, of which 42% is black, and one of the better HBCU’s with programs in the STEM Fields, Hampton University is located a stones throw away from the proposed new headquarters. And Hampton’s Engineering and Technology Department making Hampton is the first and only HBCU to have 100% control of a NASA Mission.

Would like to see something besides the usual smoke-and-mirrors here.

Misusing HBCUs as a Carrot for Black Voters

In a Democratic primary contest that hinges in part on black voters, the funding of historically black colleges and universities has become a major campaign issue. But, while both campaigns are talking about HBCUs, one is using them as a line of attack. Surrogates for Hillary Clinton have suggested that her higher-education plan is better for black students and HBCUs than that of her opponent Bernie Sanders. Not only are those surrogates wrong in their misuse of the schools, but they’re also wrong about the facts.

“By focusing exclusively on making public college free, Sanders’s plan wouldn’t spend a dime on private HBCUs and threatens roughly 50 percent of HBCUs that are not public,” said Representative Cedric Richmond of Louisiana, in a statement issued by Clinton’s campaign weeks ago. Richmond continued in his criticism that Sanders’s higher-education plan leaves HBCUs “out in the cold.”

“As Senator Sanders promotes his HBCU tour, he owes it to the students to explain why half the HBCUs in the country aren’t worth any investment,” Richmond said.

James Clyburn, a Democratic Representative from South Carolina and a Clinton backer, doubled down on Richmond’s comments days before the South Carolina primary. “If you say that you’re going to have college—free two-year college—among public institutions, why would a student go to an HBCU? And most of which are private institutions,” Clyburn told NewsOne Now. “What will happen is these HBCUs will all close down all across America because they would not be able to afford to stay open.”

With both statements, Clyburn and Richmond leverage just how sacred HBCUs are to black voters while obscuring important context. HBCUs are indeed critical to the education of black students. Despite enrolling just 8 percent of black undergraduates, they award 15 percent of the bachelor’s degrees earned by black Americans. And as the congressmen suggest, HBCUs are grossly underfunded, operating on about an eighth of the average endowment of other institutions. The arguments made by the Clinton surrogates break down, however, with a close look at the composition of HBCUs and where they fit in the black education landscape.

There are an estimated 2,872,000 black students enrolled nationally at degree-granting postsecondary institutions. Of them, only 8 percent are enrolled at historically black colleges and universities. And of all the black students at HBCUs, only about a quarter are enrolled at private HBCUs. In all, a little more than 2 percent of all black college students are enrolled at private HBCUs. It is this small percentage of students that the Clinton surrogates have made the focus of their attacks on Sanders.

Then there are the details of both higher-education plans. Both Clinton and Sanders pledge to lower student-loan interest rates and allow those with existing debt to refinance their loans. That’s where the similarities end. The Sanders plan is marked by its proposal to make public colleges and universities free. In addition to that, Sanders proposes a dramatic increase to student aid, and the candidate recently stated his backing for a dedicated $30 billion fund to support private HBCUs and other “minority-serving institutions.”

The Clinton plan also has its distinctions. It proposes extending a popular higher-education tax credit, limiting student-loan repayment to just 10 percent of monthly income and increasing federal and state investment in public schools that serve low- and middle-income students. In addition, Clinton’s higher-education plan proposes that Pell grants be expanded to cover student living expenses. It also explicitly calls for a dedicated $25 billion fund to provide support to private nonprofit schools that serve low- and middle-income students.

While the Clinton plan creates and increases funding for which black students and HBCUs are eligible, it falls short of the kind of targeted investment the candidate’s surrogates suggest it has in their criticism of Sanders. And although the Sanders plan does not include institutional support for private HBCUs, it arguably does as much as Clinton’s to support their students while also proposing tuition-free education for the vast majority of black students—at public HBCUs (73 percent) and predominately white institutions (66 percent). To be sure, the private HBCU blind spot in Sanders’s higher-education plan is frustrating. Still, for black voters questioning the candidate’s commitment to black schools and higher education for black students more broadly, it’s worth considering the potential impact.

HBCUs have proven vital in educating black students and deserve the nation’s investment. They also warrant careful discussion. Painting HBCUs with broad strokes may make for an effective line of attack, but doing so obfuscates the multiple ways black students access education and the variety of support they require.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 3, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Spike Lee Endorses the Bern

Once again evidence of that generational split…

I believe we have finally reached the point of full cleavage between the Civil Rights Generation of the 60’s, and black millennials. This has some serious repercussions whatever way the Presidential election turns out in terms of local politics, and elections – and may harbor a shakeup of the current cadre of black politicians in the US Senate and especially the House. Which means a lot more focus on the economics underpinning racism than the symbolism.

 

Spike Lee endorses Bernie Sanders: ‘When Bernie gets into the White House, he will do the right thing!’

Spike Lee is asking America to do the right thing: Vote for Bernie Sanders.

The Brooklyn-bred filmmaker endorsed the Democratic presidential hopeful Tuesday, releasing a radio ad for the Vermont senator’s campaign in South Carolina.

“Wake up! Wake up, South Carolina!” the director said in the ad, borrowing a line from his movies “Do the Right Thing” and “School Daze.”

He continued: “This is your dude, Spike Lee. And you know that I know that you know that the system is rigged! And for too long we’ve given our votes to corporate puppets. Sold the okie-doke. Ninety-nine percent of Americans were hurt by the Great Recession of 2008, and many are still recovering.”

The new spot was released just days ahead of Saturday’s Democratic primary in South Carolina.

“That’s why I am officially endorsing my brother, Bernie Sanders,” he continued in the radio ad. “When Bernie gets into the White House, he will do the right thing!”

Lee mentioned that Sanders was a part of the 1963 March on Washington with Martin Luther King Jr. and added that the senator was once arrested in Chicago “for protesting segregation in public schools.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 23, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , ,

Black Feminists and the Primary

Any automatic supposition about support of Hillary Clinton by black feminists…

Would be wrong.

Black Feminism heavily influenced the Black Panther movement, and by the end, the majority of membership in the Panthers were black women. Some historians credit women in the Panthers as being the creators of the hugely successful breakfast and lunch programs for children.

Democratic Primary Finds Black Feminists Conflicted

Ask a black feminist whether she prefers Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, and you very well might hear “Neither.”

“I long for Shirley Chisholm to be running, to be really honest,” said Renee Bracey Sherman, a reproductive justice activist in Washington, D.C.

Alas for Bracey Sherman, the congresswoman who in 1972 was the first major-party black candidateto run for president, and who promised a “bloodless revolution,” isn’t running. (Chisholm died over a decade ago.) But two candidates who vow to make history in their own ways are, and Bracey Sherman, like many black feminists MSNBC interviewed, is ambivalent.

“I’m definitely weighing my options,” she said. “A lot of my beliefs on economic policies fall in line with Bernie Sanders. However, he is not able to connect the way that gender and race intersect with economic inequality the way Hillary does.”

For weeks, Sanders and Clinton and their allies have tussled over who is the genuine progressive, whose policies are more feminist and who can make the most meaningful difference in black Americans’ lives. So far, as the primary has shifted from majority white states to more diverse ones, the feminist mantle and the black vote have been talked about as if they are separate silos.

“An emphasis on not only black women, but black feminists, is long overdue,” said Lori Adelman, co-executive director of Feministing. “So often, black women’s support is taken for granted.”

The candidates are both concertedly seeking the votes of black women, long a crucial base of the Democratic Party. Both have hired prominent black women, including feminist activists, to represent their campaigns, though Clinton’s inner circle has long been more diverse. Over the weekend, entrance polls showed Clinton winning black voters in Nevada, and polls of South Carolina, which votes Saturday, show Clinton enjoys a broad advantage among African-American voters there too. But in interviews, black feminists with influential perches in activism, journalism and academia critiqued both Democrats.

“I’m glad for any feminist who feels confident that their needs will be met by Hillary or Bernie’s presidency,” Shanelle Matthews, lead communications strategist for Black Lives Matter, wrote in an email. “As a black feminist, I’m not there yet. And frankly, I’d like to stop being lectured by white feminists who would boorishly call themselves my ally while also paternalistically scolding me for not bending toward their political ideologies.”

Black feminist critics of Clinton cite in particular past support of her husband’s policies on criminal justice and welfare reform, which exacted a disproportionate toll on African-Americans. They recoil at how in 1996, Clinton referred to “super predators” who needed to be brought “to heel,” which many saw as dehumanizing language that targeted black children in particular. “If Hillary wants to court black women, she should start by apologizing for all the ways she has hurt our families and us,” said Matthews.

University of Pennsylvania professor Salamishah Tillet, who described herself as undecided but leaning Sanders, said, “It’s hard for me to champion a Clinton prosperity narrative as proof of electability of another candidate when I feel like it decimated the black community and criminalized black men.”

Still, Tillet said, she thinks Clinton has been far more adept than Sanders in using an approach pioneered by black feminists. “I’m increasingly becoming impressed with how Clinton is invoking an intersectional framework,” she said, referring to the term coined by law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw to invoke how overlapping identities shape marginalization.

Clinton even came out and used the word in her speech in Harlem last week, quite possibly a first. “We face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges,” Clinton said. “They are intersectional, they are reinforcing and we’ve got to take them all on.”

And the candidate’s recent refrain that she is not a single-issue candidate, implicitly an attack on Sanders’ relentless focus on economics, seems to evoke a much quoted line from the black lesbian poet Audre Lorde: “There is no thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.”…Read The Rest Here

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 22, 2016 in Black History, Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bernie v Hillary

Interesting demographics in the South Carolina and Nevada turn out. Despite some pundits claims that Hillary is in cruise mode…There still could be an upset in the making if the voting demographics hold up. Basically, Hillary won the black vote…But Bernie won the Hispanic. Hillary’s voters were older, Bernie’s under 45.

It is still a horse race.

What is interesting is the if Sanders were the candidate – he beats all the Republicans handily in polls… The outlier here being positive poll numbers for Rubio. I just don’t see a third rate candidate like Rubio not losing by double digits.

Clinton v Republicans

RCP Average- Trump 2/2 – 2/17 45.3 42.5 Clinton +2.8
RCP Average – Cruz 2/2 – 2/17 45.3 44.5 Cruz +0.8
RCP Average – Rubio 2/2 – 2/17 47.5 42.8 Rubio +4.7
RCP Average – Kasich 2/10 – 2/17 47.7 40.3 Kasich +7.4
RCP Average – Carson 12/6 – 2/3               46.3 45.0 Clinton +1.3

Sanders v Republicans

RCP Average – Trump 1/9 – 2/17 48.8 41.0 Sanders +7.8
RCP Average – Cruz 2/2 – 2/15 44.0 44.0 Tie
RCP Average 2/10 – 2/15 43.0 42.5 Sanders +0.5
RCP Average 2/2 – 2/15 45.7 41.0 Sanders +4.7
RCP Average 10/29 – 2/3 45.3 44.0 Sanders +1.3

 

Sanders may have lost Nevada, but he won over the crucial Hispanic vote

Bernie Sanders may have fallen short against Hillary Clinton in Nevada today (Feb. 20), but there was a silver lining: The Vermont senator won 53% of the vote among Hispanic voters, in the first diverse state to hold its caucus, according to entrance polls.

Young voters were the difference: Sanders won 68% to 28% lead among minorities under 45 years old, showing that he resonates with millennials in Nevada, regardless of race, just as much as he did in New Hampshire and Iowa.

But, as FiveThirtyEight noted, Nevada’s voters are mostly old. And the support of millennials and the Latino community wasn’t enough to edge out Clinton, who won the Nevada Democratic caucus with 52% of the vote.

Entrance polls aren’t foolproof. As some pundits have said, in this particular case, they leave out Nevada’s most-populated county—Clark County. And, as Vox notes, they have incorrectly predicted the Latino vote in the past.

But based on the data currently on hand, 70% of voters who showed up to the polls today were over the age of 45. Among that group, Clinton led with two-thirds of the vote. She was also ahead with non-white voters overall, winning by a huge margin with black voters.

Clinton still has strong support among older Hispanic voters—a divide that was highlighted when Sanders supporters reportedly interrupted efforts by civil-rights leader Dolores Huerta, to provide Spanish translation at a rally at Harrahs casino.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 21, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Cenk Uygur Hammers Keli Goff of The Daily Beast Article on Black Folks Voting

Cenk goes off on Daily Beast columnist Keli Goff! And he is right. There is no reason to believe that voting for Sanders is against black folks interests. Or for that matter that Hillary Clinton will tackle the tough issues of race and racism in America if elected to be President.

BTx3 is not ready to go with or endorse either side at this point.

The only major satisfaction I see in electing Hillary is, after 8 years of a black President, shoving that sharpened stake up the nether parts of conservatives further by (probably) 8 years of a woman being President. And I have no doubt she is ruthless enough to deal with the conservaturd set, unlike Obama. However I have doubts whether any progress made under her leadership would be more than cosmetic in terms of the black community, in large part because of folks like the CBC supporting her.

What Bernie would do though is to attack the structural supports of racism in America – through reforming elements of the financial system. Providing black families the ability to gain wealth and pass it on is key to reforming the culture enabling racism and discrimination in this country. So when he says “bust up the big banks” – the impact of that is a lot broader than most folks understand. And Bernie has walked the walk supporting Civil Rights – for a long long time. Whether he is strong enought o dirve that legislation though is up to conjecture.

 

 
4 Comments

Posted by on February 18, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Black Lives Matter Shakes Up the Democratic Primary and Message

The Republican Party is getting shaken up by the Trumplodytes…

The Dems are finally coming to grip with their Minority constituency.

This is just one of the steps that need to be taken to reinvent and create a new Democrat Party responding to it’s modern constituency.

The Republicans…well…Not so much.

The following from the Benjamin Dixon Webcast Show

 

#BlackLivesMatter Is Winning the 2016 Democratic Primary

A disruptive protest leads candidates to change rhetoric

When Black Lives Matter protestors stormed a room at a meeting in Phoenix and demanded that the 2016 presidential candidates say the names of black people killed by the police, the response was swift: Bernie Sanders did it the next day.

“I wish that in the year 2015, I could tell you we have eliminated racism in this country, but you all know that is not true,” said Sanders, to a crowd of more than 11,000 in Houston on Sunday, and then listed the names: “Sandra Bland, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Freddie Gray and many, many others.”

It’s a testament to the influence Black Lives Matter activists are already having on the 2016 presidential race. Since the raucous protest of a few dozen mostly African-American activists brought the biggest meeting of progressives in the country to a screeching halt, Hillary Clinton repeated her calls for body cameras and improved early childhood education, and wrote “Black lives matter” in a Facebook post. Martin O’Malley promised to roll out a comprehensive plan to reform the criminal justice system, and Sanders has repeatedly brought up race on the campaign trail.

Now, Black Lives Matter leaders are preparing an agenda of policy demands and requirements designed to push Clinton, Sanders and O’Malley to embrace broad reforms to address systemic racism head-on. Activists foresee a series of demonstrations to call attention to racial injustice in the United States.

“What does the Democratic camp have to say about our society? We are in a crisis,” said Opal Tometi, cofounder of the Black Lives Matter movement. “If they want our vote, they’re going to have to speak to the death of black people at the hands of law enforcement, and create a racial justice agenda that cuts across all major issues.”

Black Lives Matter activists meeting in Cleveland this weekend will formulate a long list of policy demands for candidates, Tometi said, intended to shape the 2016 presidential race and help form the basis for candidates’ talking points.

Some of the agenda will likely include anti-bias police hiring, the demilitarization of police forces and external reviews of police practices, activists told TIME. But leaders are also calling for more sweeping reforms that include a package of progressive packages intended to help poor blacks, including lifting the minimum wage, aggressive education reform, housing protections, protecting access to the ballot box and ending mass incarceration.

A number of racial justice groups including the Black Youth Project, Million Hoodies Movement for Justice, the Dream Defenders and others are expected to be in Cleveland.

“Body cameras and dash cameras are clearly not enough, because Sandra Bland still ended up dead,” said Alicia Garza, a second cofounder of the Black Lives Matter movement, referring to a civil rights activist who was found dead in a jail cell in Texas, in what authorities have called a suicide. Many observers have called her arrest violent and excessive.

“I want to see from all these candidates is program for how they’re going to aggressively work to ensure that black lives matter,” Garza continued. “Not just in relation to policing: we have to dive into questions of economics and democracy.”

Black Lives Matter grew out of the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012 and the violence last year in Ferguson, when Michael Brown, an unarmed black man was killed by the police. Over the past year, the organizationally diffuse movement has mounted large protests against police violence and incarceration policies. The movement is fueled by a widespread anger over police violence against black citizens.

Of the Democratic candidates, Clinton has perhaps addressed race in the most detail since launching her campaign. She has called for automatic voter registration and protecting the rights of black Americans at the ballot box, body cameras on police officers, early childhood education directed at low-income families and overhauling the criminal justice system. She has called for greater gun control and raising the minimum wage, and spoken specifically to the persistence of racism.

“Our problem is not all kooks and Klansman,” Clinton said in a speech in June. “It’s also in the cruel joke that goes unchallenged. It’s in the off-hand comments about not wanting ‘those people’ in the neighborhood.”

Sanders led anti-segregation efforts in Chicago in the 1960s and participated in the Million Man March, but does not frequently talk about racism on the campaign trail. He has become increasingly vocal about racism, particularly since Saturday, calling for more accountability among police and larger steps to address prison reform. O’Malley has called for better funding of independent external review boards and reducing penalties for nonviolent criminals.

The spectacle on Saturday at the Netroots Nation conference in Phoenix, Arizona began during former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley’s presidential town hall question-and-answer session, when several dozen Black Lives Matter protestors marched into the conference room, chanting, “What side are you on black people, what side are you on!” and chanted “Say her name! O’Malley was silenced for some ten minutes before finally addressing the protestors and calling for broader criminal justice reforms. Sanders nearly left the stage in frustration as the chanting continued.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: