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Roots of Revolution – The Chumph’s Republicans Try Repression of Dissent

White wing Republicans don’t like the fact that Americans have the right to protest. As such, what we are seeing around the country in Republican dominated legislatures is a series of laws making it illegal to peacefully protest, attaching draconian prison terms to any form of peaceful dissent.

Been round the world, and seen this approach in dictatorships and repressive governments a number of times. It usually ends with violent street riots, things getting blown up, said politicians sometimes getting assassinated, and said country devolving into something which looks like Syria.

Unlike most of these countries, there are a large number of Americans with the skills to “break things”, courtesy of the US Military, Since the US abandoned the draft, and moved to an all Volunteer Army, the vast majority of the people in the Military come from the bottom 50% of income levels. Ergo – the folks who are getting screwed by the Chumph’s budget, and Trumpcare. So the old thinking that the Military supports the right doesn’t exactly hold water anymore.

It may well be, that in order to recover democracy in America – Progressives and real American Patriots (not the fake plastic flag waving kind most often seen at Chumph rallies) are going to have to go ISIS on some Republican ass…

And real fucking soon.

Image result for trump inauguration demonstration

Putin’s Bitch and Republicans are trying to criminalize the First Amendment rights of peaceful protesters. Time for protesters to fight back.

 

In an unprecedented court escalation, Trump protesters could be facing decades in prison for Inauguration demonstrations

Nearly six months after Donald Trump was sworn into office, more than 200 protesters who gathered in Washington, D.C. to protest his inauguration are facing felony charges that carry sentences of 70 to 80 years.

According to Al Jazeera, the 212 protesters were arrested by the Metropolitan Police Department and initially charged with felony rioting, a crime that carries a 10-year prison sentence and a $25,000 fine. On April 27, the Superior Court of the District of Columbia added additional charges that include urging to riot, conspiracy to riot and destruction of property.

The possibility of long-term prison sentences for these protesters could have a chilling effect on participation in future rallies, particularly at a time of heightened levels of anti-Trump activism. While it’s unclear whether police departments will respond to large-scale political protests in a similar fashion, a dangerous precedent has been set. These legal actions may also infringe on the demonstrators’ First Amendment rights, as they directly target anti-Trump protest movements.

Olivia Alsip, a 23-year-old from Chicago, told Al Jazeera she never envisioned participating in the anti-Trump protests on inauguration day could leave her facing an 80-year prison sentence: “It seems that innocent until proven guilty is a falsehood—all the way from the prosecution and police to the people who had previously supported me in my activism.”

Alsip and the other defendants face the additional strain of having to pay for travel expenses to and from Washington for each of their court hearings before they go to trial. “Most of us don’t have a whole lot of money,” she said. “Generally we are fighting the rich because we are economically or politically disadvantaged and don’t have a lot of capital.”

As political protests and civil disobedience reach their highest levels since the 1960s, 18 states have responded by proposing over 30 bills aimed at suppressing demonstrations by increasing and expanding penalties for protesters. A new law in Missouri prohibits protesters from covering their faces with masks or other disguises. Florida, Tennessee, Georgia and Iowa have introduced bills that call for increased penalties for blocking traffic and demonstrating on private property.

The American Civil Liberties Union has called these new laws “unconstitutional,” vowing to “fight in statehouses against any bill that violates the First Amendment.”

While several defendants have pleaded guilty to shorten their sentences, about 130 of the defendants have joined a “points of unity” agreement pledging to reject any potential plea deals and cooperation with prosecutors. On May 26, 21 defendants filed motions to have their cases dismissed.

Following the January 20 arrests, lawyers for some of the arrested protesters filed a class action lawsuit against the MPD alleging that law enforcement engaged in excessive use of force and conducted false arrests. The Office of Police Complaints, a D.C. government agency, has called for an independent investigation evaluating the actions of MPD officers that day.

 

 

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Putin’s Bitch Orders Government Not to Respond to Democrat Requests

Well, I hope this dispels any illusions the weak kneed Democrats may have had about Putin’s Bitch operating a legal government.

Maybe it is time to start breaking things…Like ceasing all operations of the House and Senate until an Impeachment can be done.

Trump White House orders federal agencies to blow off requests for info from all Democrats

Image result for trump in jail

Democrats keep sending letters to government agencies requesting information — but the Trump White House is instructing those agencies to completely ignore them.

Politico reports that the Trump administration has ordered agencies to stop responding to oversight requests from Democrats, as administration officials “fear the information could be weaponized against President Donald Trump.”

One White House official told Politico that such restrictions were entirely justified because Republicans now control all three branches of government and thus don’t have to pay any attention to the minority party’s requests for information.

“You have Republicans leading the House, the Senate and the White House,” the official explained. “I don’t think you’d have the Democrats responding to every minority member request if they were in the same position.”

Politico notes that while the Obama administration regularly drew complaints from Republicans for being slow to respond to their oversight requests, the Obama White House never issued a sweeping order sent out to multiple agencies telling them not to cooperate.

“I do not remember… a blanket request from the Obama administration not to respond to Republicans,” a former GOP staffer told the publication.

 

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The Revolution Will Not be Twittered – Some Home Basics

When you say the term “survivalist” or “disaster prepper” it conjures images of some guy, armed to the gills, living in a bunker in the mountains. While those guys certainly exist, in reality there are a wide range of preparations, depending on locale and resources everyone should have. And no – this doesn’t involve various forms of guns and armaments…Unless you are preparing for the Second American Revolution against Trump and the Reich.

Now, as I have said before I live in a fairly remote area near the ocean. Common problems in my environment beyond the normal stuff other’s face  include Hurricanes, Nor’Easters (which are actually worse). There is a fault-line off the east coast which poses an average to the rest of the country outside of California threat – as well as fire and flooding in big storms (similar to what happened in North Carolina a few months ago.)

That means, I do some things that you folks living away from the coast have to do. Those issues include massive flooding (I have had 3-4′ of water under the house (It is designed to survive 12′). 140 MPH winds (It is designed to survive as Cat 5 Hurricane..and has).

Because of the flooding issue, I keep a small Jon Boat hanging up on the pilings not far from the door – so I can row or walk to dry land. Because electrical can be out for days – I keep a small generator ready to go in a box on the second floor. I also keep an indoor propane heater (get it cheaper off-season) in the event a Nor’Easter knocks the power out during the winter. A bicycle in an elevated shed on the property. Two 20 gallon propane tanks (the grill ones) as well as a couple of dozen of the little 1 lb propane bottles for use with the heater, or propane lanterns.

The point being that a emergency/disaster kit is tailored to your environment.

Then there is a list of basic stuff everyone should have for a 3-5 day outage –

A 5 or 6 gallon water storage jug per person. You need fresh water! Two types, a plastic 5-6 gallon (forget the “blob” soft side type) – and for the “prepper”. And no, you will find out very quickly should the situation arise, 6 Gallons isn’t much water. I generally use a teaspoon of Clorox to stabilize the water in the jug, but there are other ways.

Coleman 5-Gallon Water Carrier

 

 The next item is flashlights or lanterns. The choices are Battery, Solar, propane, or Coleman. 

I tend to keep a combination of the battery, Solar, and propane. Even with a stack of batteries, you are going to run out pretty fast although you get lots of light. Besides a collection of flashlights in convenient locations around the house, I keep several lanterns for area lighting. With the new LEDs you get more battery life, even though you get less light. Forget rechargeable (if you are using these you have no power to recharge!).  When buying a light, check the “Lumens” which is a measure the light puts out. Go here for a comparison. A regular incandescent 60 Watt bulb puts out 800 Lumens.

Battery area/room Lights (4 D Cells)

FL452WRBP-1

300 Lumens

ENFTL45-1

525 Lumens

A Battery-LED light claimed to be 800 Lumens. It also can be switched to lower light levels. They claim 200 hours run time at 200 Lumens. @40

Personal light – These are a take on the old Miner’s lamps, updated. Have been in tunnels underground, and these work great. Also useful for working on small objects where there isn’t any, or enough area light. They run from $5 – 20 a set. I keep several around. Makes it easy to navigate around a dark house and keep both hands free.

If you want a flashlight that is the best buy the Pelican line. I keep a Pelican Sabrelight and a Mitylight in my car and tool kit. They are waterproof, and survive almost anything. Other thing to consider is a hand-cranked flashlight.

I keep a solar/hand cranked flashlight with built in radio. These have a USB Port for phone charging. You will build muscles doing it though. The advantage to these is the radio to pick up emergency signals and directions. Under $20. Without the Radio and USB –  flashlight under $10.

Gas and Propane for lighting a room or area – Coleman is pretty much it, although there are several companies which produce lanterns a 2-5 times the price.

Coleman Premium Dual Fuel Lantern

The newest in the Coleman line. It burns either Coleman Fuel or unleaded gasoline. It produces light equivalent to a 60 Watt Light Bulb. @$65

Coleman Dual Fuel

Coleman Northstar propane lantern. About 10-15 hours on a 1 lb tank. I keep two of these around for camping or emergencies @ 800-900 Lumens @$30

Coleman Two Mantle InstaStart QuickPack Lantern. @$20. Folds up to backpack.

Last ditch emergency lighting – Solar

Solar lights are generally pretty crappy. But if you just need a light to get around the couch – they will do when all else fails.

Wow …That was longer than I planned and I only covered two items!

Will add more the next post…And here you thought it was only about guns.

 

 

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Living Under a Racist

Kareem is saying pretty much what many of us are saying.

Now is the time for resistance.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: What it means to be black during a Trump administration

On hopelessness — and the way to escape it.

 

Nicholas M. Butler, the Nobel Prize-winning American philosopher, once said that optimism is the foundation of courage. Today, African Americans will have to dig pretty deep to find that foundation because there’s not much optimism in sight. Yes, we’re all supposed to come together after an election, let bygones be bygones, and march forward unified as neither Democrats nor Republicans but patriotic Americans celebrating the triumph of the democratic process. But it’s difficult to link arms when the home of the free embraces the leadership of a racist.

Let the other groups denigrated and threatened by Trump speak for themselves. The women, immigrants, Muslims, Jews, the LGBT community and others who now must walk through the streets of their country for the next four years in shame and fear, knowing that their value as human beings has been diminished by their neighbors. I only speak for myself as an African American and I speak with the rage of betrayal.

After numerous police shootings of unarmed blacks every year, national Black Lives Matter protests, and unprecedented expressions of support from pro athletes, black Americans saw a glimmer of hope that white Americans were finally acknowledging the overwhelming evidence of institutional racism that had been glaringly obvious to blacks for many years. But that hope was misplaced. Instead, a majority of white America chose to swallow the blue pill, preferring to, as Morpheus explains in “The Matrix,” “wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe.”

Unfortunately, black Americans don’t get to wake up and believe what they want to believe, because they have to face another day of lower pay and higher job discrimination, less educational opportunity and greater health problems. These injustices were easier to endure when there seemed to be a sustained path to improvement that the country supported. But now we have the “What have you got to lose?” non-policy that bulldozes the path to rubble.

The white Americans who made up a vast majority of Trump’s supporters were reacting to much more than the economy (which has been steadily strengthening), or Washington gridlock (which Trump has no specific plan or power to change), or fear of terrorism (which his unconstitutional plan of extreme vetting shows no evidence of combating). What some fear most is the changing shade of skin color of America. As the Latino, Asian and black population rises, the white majority will soon disappear. Between 2000 and 2010, whites dropped from 75.1 percent of the population to 63.7 percent. By 2050, whites will be in the minority at 47 percent. Trump represents the last wisp of the rich white plantation owner holding on to the glories of the past.

His history of racism, from Justice Department lawsuits for housing discrimination to claim that Mexican heritage disqualified a federal judge, has already been well-documented. But his disconnect from black people and black culture was especially evident the weekend before the election, when he complained about the musical performances of Jay Z and Beyoncé at a Hillary Clinton rally. (Never mind that Ted Nugent, who had repeatedly threatened to kill President Obama and Hillary Clinton, was performing at his rally by using profanity and grabbing his crotch.) “Did you hear the other night?” Trump asked his audience. “So many people were insulted, they left. … They hear the worst words, the worst language ever.” What Trump fails to appreciate is that the rawness of the musicians’ language is part of the message. It is the urban-charged patois of anger, frustration and empowerment. Similar to the Trumpites’ chanting “Lock her up!” but with less violence.

How can we hope that this man understands or cares about us? Especially now that white America has rewarded his outrageous racism, misogyny, xenophobia and religious intolerance with a mandate to put those beliefs into policy. For African Americans, America just got a little more threatening, a little more claustrophobic, a lot less hopeful. We feel like disposable extras, the nameless bodies who are never part of the main cast.

What’s important now is to skip the wallowing, finger-pointing, name-calling period and begin an immediate and focused effort on dominating the 2018 midterm elections during which all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and one-third of Senate seats will be in play. People of color cannot merely play defense anymore. They must mount a long-term offensive that includes relentlessly challenging every act of institutional racism in the country. African Americans make up only 12.3 percent of the population, so it’s imperative that we form a coalition with other groups that are targeted by Trump, including women, Latinos, immigrants and the LGBT community. We have to ignore the self-loathing collaborators among those groups because they prefer the path that makes them think they will be accepted and prized as equals when, at best, they are merely patsies for Trump’s movement.

In “Formation,” Beyoncé says, “I dream it, I work hard, I grind till I own it.” Donald Trump may not appreciate those words, but those words can inspire all African Americans and others who wish to make America America again. Not hope, but action. Not later, but now.

 
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Posted by on November 10, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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Love Trumps Hate

Even the little ones “Get It”

 

And across the country the revolt grows…

 
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Posted by on November 10, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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Coca Cola Shuts Down Production in Venzuela

Because they can’t buy sugar in the country! Artificially sweetened drinks are not affected.The Venezuelan economy is a rolling disaster, brought on not only by foreign embargoes, but the complete incompetence of their government starting with Hugo Chavez. The country is quite probably on the way to a violent overthrow of the current Government. The story of how this oil rich country got there is a story of rich and poor, and a story of how America controls the Western Hemisphere.

Been to Venezuela on business and pleasure several times before Chavez was elected. It is a beautiful country, and I had considered retiring there. The cost of living was very low, and and the beaches are out of this world. Actually was there during one of their government coups, which was a little crazy – as I was stranded about 5 miles from my hotel and had to walk back. I had hired a driver to take me to see some of the sights, who became afraid to be on the road due to the roadblocks. While my poor Spanish isn’t going to fool anyone that I am a local, being brown does have the advantage of being able to blend in.Buying a Panama Hat, inexpensive sunglasses, local made shirt, pants, cheap watch, and a pair of Huaraches, as well as a bundle of flowers to carry – Iooking like your average Venezuelan businessman going to meet his girlfriend or mistress…I didn’t get stopped by the authorities or a second look.

Love the Country, hate what has happened to it, and the seeming inability to share the wealth with the poor.

Coca-Cola halts production in Venezuela

Coca-Cola is halting production in Venezuela of its namesake beverage due to a sugar shortage brought on by the country’s grinding economic crisis.

The Atlanta-based company said in an emailed statement Friday said that its production of sugar-sweetened beverages will be suspended in the coming days after local suppliers reported they had run out of the raw material. Sugar-free beverages are not affected and the company said its offices and distribution centers remain open in Venezuela.

The move comes as Venezuela’s economy is teetering on the edge of collapse with widespread food shortages and inflation forecast to surpass 700 percent. Last month, Empresas Polar, Venezuela’s largest food and beverage company, stopped production of beer because of a lack of imported barley.

The Obama administration and governments in Latin America are encouraging efforts by former Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero to defuse the increasingly tense standoff in Venezuela

Zapatero said in a visit to Caracas this week that President Nicolas Maduro and leaders of the opposition expressed a willingness to launch a national dialogue aimed at resolving the country’s challenges.

Lining up to get in the State run supermarket

It’s unclear what the next steps will be but the U.S. State Department on Friday said it welcomes the initiative as a way to guarantee respect for the Venezuelan people and the rule of law. The foreign ministries of Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay also made a call for dialogue.

Zapatero’s peacemaking follows a week of violent clashes between security forces and the opposition who are demanding Maduro’s ouster.

Empty Shelves

Use your fingerprint to buy groceries.

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2016 in General

 

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Free Them All – Background and History of the Black Panthers

Watched the film discussed here last night on PBS. It was by far the most level headed and fair treatment of the Black Panther Party I have ever seen. Here is an interview of the producer of the film…

At the end of the film, they discuss the mass incarceration of the Panther members in an attempt by the Government to destroy them…It didn’t. 50 years later some of those surviving Panthers are still incarcerated. BLM can learn a lot of lessons from the experiences of the BPP.

Had this poster hanging on the wall. It is a classic of Huey Newton.

Free Em All: 50 Years Later, Black Panthers Are Still Fighting for Freedom

It’s early on the Monday morning, post-snowmaggedon 2016, and I have an unexpected 10 minutes to spare. I know I should close my eyes, center myself for the day ahead, but instead I FaceTime Baba Sekou Odinga. I don’t really have anything to say. Mostly I just pick on him, tell bad jokes, make faces, sing off-key. “Why you do that to that man,” the homie Everton who has been navigating me through the storm all weekend, asks, laughing.

And as soon he asks, it’s like I slip through a wrinkle in time, back 14 months to November 25th, 2014 when, after near 34 years in prison, more than half of which was spent in solitary confinement, former Black Panther, Sekou Odinga, walked out of a New York State prison into the loving arms his children and his wife, Dequi. Nine hours later, he would be greeted in Harlem at the National Black Theater by over 200 people who had found out 48 hours before that a day we had worked for but did not know we would ever see, was here: Sekou, one of nearly 100 American political prisoners, activists from 1960s through the 1980s, was free.

Soffiyah Elijah, executive director of the Correctional Association, former deputy director of the Criminal Justice Institute at Harvard Law School (HLS), and one of the attorneys who has worked diligently for years on political prisoner cases, including the Herculean effort to secure parole for Sekou Odinga, wrote:

Political prisoners are men and women who have been incarcerated for their political views and actions. They have consciously fought against social injustice, colonialism and/or imperialism and have been incarcerated as a result of their political commitments. Even while in prison, these men and women continue to adhere to their principles.

This, Elijah writes, is the internationally accepted definition of political prisoners, and most of us rightly associate it with people like Nelson Mandela. What we don’t generally jump to, is that apartheid was the progeny of Jim Crow, and the struggle against apartheid was deeply informed by the struggle against Jim Crow and for human rights for Black people living in America. In short, what we believe is deserved for people living in other countries, we don’t always appreciate should apply to us. We should.

From the Black Panther Newspaper, the art of Emory Douglass is classic.

Indeed, as I write this, many of metrics that quantify what makes a life quality–fair employment, decent education, affordable housing and meaningful health care–are as disrupted today as they were for Black South Africans during apartheid and African Americans pre-Civil Rights Movement. In other words, the name-calling leveled against the Black Panthers, resurrected recently because of imagery in Queen Bey’s Formation, was ahistorical (read: a outright fucking lie). The Panthers were a human rights organization and as we know given the history of the slave patrols, the three branches of the US government, the KKK and today’s police forces from Ferguson to Baltimore, from LA to New York, any organization or person calling for the full human rights of Black people has been met with, um, resistance.

Which is why it’s infuriating to hear some people argue that the Rapture or some shit has come because the Obamas look mighty fine and Oprah has a network where you can experience Tyler Perry’s imagination to your heart’s content, no disrespect. I mean, rock on and whatnot but let’s understand at least this: elevating the exception to the rule to the level of the rule itself doesn’t make for sound reasoning–anymore than toxic water poured down the throats of Black people by a governor who probably washes his ass with bottles of Voss or Black people getting dead every 28 hours by police, is progress just because we can hashtag it.

Two generations ago, the man who was born under a Gemini sun in 1944 and raised up in Queens, New York in a world where poverty in Black communities left children hungry and hurting, and where killer cops regularly cut #BlackLivesShort with impunity, Sekou Odinga was inspired to revolution by Minister Malcolm X. He would hang around Malcolm’s organization, the OAAU (the Organization of African American Unity) but didn’t officially become a member until after Minister Malcolm was assassinated. Roughly 18 months later, on October 15, 1966, two young men who were also inspired by Minister Malcolm, Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, would stand on the steps of the Alameda County Courthouse in Oakland, California and announce the birth of The Black Panther Party and its 10-point program that demanded human rights for all Black people. Two years after that, Seale traveled to New York to get things kicked off in the City that Stays Woke, and talked that good Let’s Get Free talk to group of young brothers and sisters who’d gathered in an apartment in the East Village where Sekou Odinga was in the mix.

When I tell Sekou I am writing this piece he says, “Tell them how we just wanted our people to be safe. Tell them how we fed our children. Tell them how we opened the first-ever free health clinic in America and that it was in the Bronx. Tell them we stood with mothers who were being harassed at welfare offices. And yes, tell them we fought police, but tell them we did it to defend ourselves because what we, a bunch of 20-year-old kids did, exposed what the government with billions of dollars refused to do. And they couldn’t take that. Ultimately, that’s what made us political prisoners. That’s why we were targeted. That’s why we were killed.”

In fact, in FBI documents on the Party, the government noted that far more dangerous than any gun brandished by a Panther, was the fact that they fed children.

But in the Black Panther Party, Sekou, like thousands of young people across the country, found a place where he could lean in–elbows, shoulders and back–on the question of how we were going to finally demand and realize our human rights. It was a seminal moment in the long Black history of Black people giving no more fucks because then, like now, our lives were at risk simply by walking outside and say, not having taken a dog to the vet in 1967 or buying a bag of skittles for our little brother in 2012. And despite all the variance in stories I’ve heard about the Panthers since I was an undergrad in the late 80s and early 90s majoring in political science and Black studies, in the more than quarter century I’ve known Sekou, it seems that to a person, everyone agreed that he was kind of stand-up, straight-backed soldier you’d want on your side.

Which is why, I suppose the decision was made that he be the one to walk into Clinton Prison in New Jersey on November 2nd, 1979. And six years and six months to the day that unarmed/hands up Assata Shakur, was shot and arrested on the New Jersey Turnpike, Sekou would enter that dungeon, take his friend and comrade by her hand, and walk her the fuck out that joint….Read the Rest Here

The catcall “Pig” as a slang description of the Police was initiated by the BPP and co-opted by virtually every protest group in the 60’s.

 

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2016 in Black History, BlackLivesMatter

 

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