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How the Chumph Became a KGB “Asset”

How the Chumph was recruited as a KGB Useful Fool

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The Hidden History of Trump’s First Trip to Moscow

In 1987, a young real estate developer traveled to the Soviet Union. The KGB almost certainly made the trip happen.

It was 1984 and General Vladimir Alexandrovich Kryuchkov had a problem. The general occupied one of the KGB’s most exalted posts. He was head of the First Chief Directorate, the prestigious KGB arm responsible for gathering foreign intelligence.

Kryuchkov had begun his career with five years at the Soviet mission in Budapest under Ambassador Yuri Andropov. In 1967 Andropov became KGB chairman. Kryuchkov went to Moscow, took up a number of sensitive posts, and established a reputation as a devoted and hardworking officer. By 1984, Kryuchkov’s directorate in Moscow was bigger than ever before—12,000 officers, up from about 3,000 in the 1960s. His headquarters at Yasenevo, on the wooded southern outskirts of the city, was expanding: Workmen were busy constructing a 22-story annex and a new 11-story building.

In politics, change was in the air. Soon a new man would arrive in the Kremlin, Mikhail Gorbachev. Gorbachev’s policy of detente with the West—a refreshing contrast to the global confrontation of previous general secretaries—meant the directorate’s work abroad was more important than ever.

Kryuchkov faced several challenges. First, a hawkish president, Ronald Reagan, was in power in Washington. The KGB regarded his two predecessors, Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, as weak. By contrast Reagan was seen as a potent adversary. The directorate was increasingly preoccupied with what it believed—wrongly—was an American plot to conduct a preemptive nuclear strike against the USSR.

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It was around this time that Donald Trump appears to have attracted the attention of Soviet intelligence. How that happened, and where that relationship began, is an answer hidden somewhere in the KGB’s secret archives. Assuming, that is, that the documents still exist.

Trump’s first visit to Soviet Moscow in 1987 looks, with hindsight, to be part of a pattern. The dossier by the former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele asserts that the Kremlin had been cultivating Trump for “at least five years” before his stunning victory in the 2016 US presidential election. This would take us back to around 2011 or 2012.

In fact, the Soviet Union was interested in him too, three decades earlier. The top level of the Soviet diplomatic service arranged his 1987 Moscow visit. With assistance from the KGB. It took place while Kryuchkov was seeking to improve the KGB’s operational techniques in one particular and sensitive area. The spy chief wanted KGB staff abroad to recruit more Americans.

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In addition to shifting politics in Moscow, Kryuchkov’s difficulty had to do with intelligence gathering. The results from KGB officers abroad had been disappointing. Too often they would pretend to have obtained information from secret sources. In reality, they had recycled material from newspapers or picked up gossip over lunch with a journalist. Too many residencies had “paper agents” on their books: targets for recruitment who had nothing to do with real intelligence.

Kryuchkov sent out a series of classified memos to KGB heads of station. Oleg Gordievsky—formerly based in Denmark and then in Great Britain—copied them and passed them to British intelligence. He later co-published them with the historian Christopher Andrew under the title Comrade Kryuchkov’s Instructions: Top Secret Files on KGB Foreign Operations 1975–1985.

In January 1984 Kryuchkov addressed the problem during a biannual review held in Moscow, and at a special conference six months later. The urgent subject: how to improve agent recruitment. The general urged his officers to be more “creative.” Previously they had relied on identifying candidates who showed ideological sympathy toward the USSR: leftists, trade unionists and so on. By the mid-1980s these were not so many. So KGB officers should “make bolder use of material incentives”: money. And use flattery, an important tool.

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The Center, as KGB headquarters was known, was especially concerned about its lack of success in recruiting US citizens, according to Andrew and Gordievsky. The PR Line—that is, the Political Intelligence Department stationed in KGB residencies abroad—was given explicit instructions to find “U.S. targets to cultivate or, at the very least, official contacts.” “The main effort must be concentrated on acquiring valuable agents,” Kryuchkov said.

The memo—dated February 1, 1984—was to be destroyed as soon as its contents had been read. It said that despite improvements in “information gathering,” the KGB “has not had great success in operation against the main adversary [America].”

One solution was to make wider use of “the facilities of friendly intelligence services”—for example, Czechoslovakian or East German spy networks.

And: “Further improvement in operational work with agents calls for fuller and wider utilisation of confidential and special unofficial contacts. These should be acquired chiefly among prominent figures in politics and society, and important representatives of business and science.” These should not only “supply valuable information” but also “actively influence” a country’s foreign policy “in a direction of advantage to the USSR.”

There were, of course, different stages of recruitment. Typically, a case officer would invite a target to lunch. The target would be classified as an “official contact.” If the target appeared responsive, he (it was rarely she) would be promoted to a “subject of deep study,” an obyekt razrabotki. The officer would build up a file, supplemented by official and covert material. That might include readouts from conversations obtained through bugging by the KGB’s technical team.

The KGB also distributed a secret personality questionnaire, advising case officers what to look for in a successful recruitment operation. In April 1985 this was updated for “prominent figures in the West.” The directorate’s aim was to draw the target “into some form of collaboration with us.” This could be “as an agent, or confidential or special or unofficial contact.”

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The form demanded basic details—name, profession, family situation, and material circumstances. There were other questions, too: what was the likelihood that the “subject could come to power (occupy the post of president or prime minister)”? And an assessment of personality. For example: “Are pride, arrogance, egoism, ambition or vanity among subject’s natural characteristics?”

The most revealing section concerned kompromat. The document asked for: “Compromising information about subject, including illegal acts in financial and commercial affairs, intrigues, speculation, bribes, graft … and exploitation of his position to enrich himself.” Plus “any other information” that would compromise the subject before “the country’s authorities and the general public.” Naturally the KGB could exploit this by threatening “disclosure.”

Finally, “his attitude towards women is also of interest.” The document wanted to know: “Is he in the habit of having affairs with women on the side?”

When did the KGB open a file on Donald Trump? We don’t know, but Eastern Bloc security service records suggest this may have been as early as 1977. That was the year when Trump married Ivana Zelnickova, a twenty-eight-year-old model from Czechoslovakia. Zelnickova was a citizen of a communist country. She was therefore of interest both to the Czech intelligence service, the StB, and to the FBI and CIA.

During the Cold War, Czech spies were known for their professionalism. Czech and Hungarian officers were typically used in espionage actions abroad, especially in the United States and Latin America. They were less obvious than Soviet operatives sent by Moscow.Image result for trump KGB

Zelnickova was born in Zlin, an aircraft manufacturing town in Moravia. Her first marriage was to an Austrian real estate agent. In the early 1970s she moved to Canada, first to Toronto and then to Montreal, to be with a ski instructor boyfriend. Exiting Czechoslovakia during this period was, the files said, “incredibly difficult.” Zelnickova moved to New York. In April 1977 she married Trump.

According to files in Prague, declassified in 2016, Czech spies kept a close eye on the couple in Manhattan. (The agents who undertook this task were code-named Al Jarza and Lubos.) They opened letters sent home by Ivana to her father, Milos, an engineer. Milos was never an agent or asset. But he had a functional relationship with the Czech secret police, who would ask him how his daughter was doing abroad and in return permit her visits home. There was periodic surveillance of the Trump family in the United States. And when Ivana and Donald Trump, Jr., visited Milos in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, further spying, or “cover.”

Like with other Eastern Bloc agencies, the Czechs would have shared their intelligence product with their counterparts in Moscow, the KGB. Trump may have been of interest for several reasons. One, his wife came from Eastern Europe. Two—at a time after 1984 when the Kremlin was experimenting with perestroika, or Communist Party reform—Trump had a prominent profile as a real estate developer and tycoon. According to the Czech files, Ivana mentioned her husband’s growing interest in politics. Might Trump at some stage consider a political career?

The KGB wouldn’t invite someone to Moscow out of altruism. Dignitaries flown to the USSR on expenses-paid trips were typically left-leaning writers or cultural figures. The state would expend hard currency; the visitor would say some nice things about Soviet life; the press would report these remarks, seeing in them a stamp of approval.

Despite Gorbachev’s policy of engagement, he was still a Soviet leader. The KGB continued to view the West with deep suspicion. It carried on with efforts to subvert Western institutions and acquire secret sources, with NATO its No. 1 strategic intelligence target.

At this point it is unclear how the KGB regarded Trump. To become a full KGB agent, a foreigner had to agree to two things. (An “agent” in a Russian or British context was a secret intelligence source.) One was “conspiratorial collaboration.” The other was willingness to take KGB instruction.

According to Andrew and Gordievsky’s book Comrade Kryuchkov’s Instructions, targets who failed to meet these criteria were classified as “confidential contacts.” The Russian word was doveritelnaya svyaz. The aspiration was to turn trusted contacts into full-blown agents, an upper rung of the ladder.

As Kryuchkov explained, KGB residents were urged to abandon “stereotyped methods” of recruitment and use more flexible strategies—if necessary getting their wives or other family members to help.

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As Trump tells it, the idea for his first trip to Moscow came after he found himself seated next to the Soviet ambassador Yuri Dubinin. This was in autumn 1986; the event was a luncheon held by Leonard Lauder, the businessman son of Estée Lauder. Dubinin’s daughter Natalia “had read about Trump Tower and knew all about it,” Trump said in his 1987 bestseller, The Art of the Deal.

Trump continued: “One thing led to another, and now I’m talking about building a large luxury hotel, across the street from the Kremlin, in partnership with the Soviet government.”

Trump’s chatty version of events is incomplete. According to Natalia Dubinina, the actual story involved a more determined effort by the Soviet government to seek out Trump. In February 1985 Kryuchkov complained again about “the lack of appreciable results of recruitment against the Americans in most Residencies.” The ambassador arrived in New York in March 1986. His original job was Soviet ambassador to the U.N.; his daughter Dubinina was already living in the city with her family, and she was part of the Soviet U.N. delegation….more…

 

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Sugar Coated Kisses for Putin From the Chumph

Putin’s boi toy rushed to arrive early in Hanoi met his master privately. Leaving the Chumph to breathlessly explain how good Putin was for him.

Noe – there are a few terabytes of hard information connecting the Russians to hacking the election. Putin’s bitch will have none of it.

 

 

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Chumph Campaign Staffer Pleads Guilty to Treason

The MSM is watching the wrong guys – Manafort and Gates.

The guy with the information to sink the Chumph is George Papadopoulos, who just pled “Guilty” to  lying to the FBI about his setting up meetings and the relationship between the campaign and Putin’s spies.

Looks like “Svetlana” had him dangling on a string as well.

This one could get real interesting because of his plea – he has agreed to be a Stoolie… And the fact he reported to Jefferson Davis Sessions who has lied continuously about meeting the Russian Agents. Indeed, it appears that Papadopoulos set up meetings between Jefferson Davis and Russian Agents. While the case against Manafort leads to Chumph criminal activity and how the Russians bought the Chumph – this one leads to Treason.

Russian-linked Trump campaign aide pleads guilty to making false statements to FBI

George Papadopoulos, the former Trump campaign aide who repeatedly tried to set up meetings with Russian government officials, has pleaded guilty to making false statements to FBI agents.

According to the indictment, Papadopoulos made his false statements to agents earlier this year in January. The former Trump campaign aide, who joined the campaign in March of 2016, made false statements about the nature of his contacts with Russian-linked figures.

“Papadopoulos claimed that his interactions with an overseas professor, who defendant Papadopoulos understood to have substantial connections to Russian government officials, occurred before [he] became a foreign policy adviser to the campaign,” the indictment (PDF) alleges.

“Papadopoulos acknowledged that the professor had told him about the Russians possessing ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Hillary Clinton in the form of ‘thousands of emails,’ but stated multiple times that he learned that information prior to joining the campaign. In truth and in fact, however… Papadopoulos learned he would be an advisor to the campaign in early March, and met the professor on or about March 14, 2016.”

The indictment also alleges that Papadopoulos told FBI agents that the professor in question was an unimportant figure — even though agents later determined that Papadopoulos knew full well about the professor’s deep ties to the Kremlin.

Additionally, Papadopoulos told FBI agents that he had very limited interactions with an unidentified Russian woman — but agents later learned that he reached out to her with the specific intention of arranging meetings between the Trump campaign and Russian government officials.

“After his trip to Washington, D.C. defendant PAPADOPOULOS worked with the Professor and the Female Russian National to arrange a meeting between the Campaign and the Russian government, and took steps to advise the Campaign of his progress,” the indictment states.

 

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Source of North Korea ICBM? Putin’s Bitch’s Master

One of the questions about North Korea’s missile program is how exactly did the improve from basically short range missiles capable of reaching Japan, to true ICBMs capable of reaching the East Coast of the US in a little more than a year?

Turns out the answer to that question isn’t aid from China. It is Missile Technology given to the North Koreans by the Chumph’s butt-buddy, Putin.

Putin has transferred SS-18/19 capability to the North Koreans. More than likely, the Russians have also given the North Koreans the miniaturized W-31 Warhead capability, first  stolen from the US during the Reagan Administration. Below is a graphic of potential North Korean Nuclear targets captured by the Washington Post..

If the Chumph wasn’t so busy sucking Putn’s man parts, he would have the courage to cut off the NK Missile pipeline.

 

To understand how “rapid” this missile “development” has gone , the following with the leftmost red line being the NK launch on July 4th of this year, and the rightmost red line being the July 28th launch. –

 

NORTH KOREA’S NEW MISSILES CAME FROM UKRAINE AND RUSSIA, REPORT CLAIMS

The speed at which North Korea has ramped up its missile and nuclear defense programs within the last two years is reportedly due to purchases Kim Jong Un’s regime has made on a weapons black market linked to the Ukraine and Russia as the United States and the globe frets over a potential military conflict.

A new report released Monday by the International Institute for Strategic Studiesexplained the North has made “astounding strides” in missile development and explained it could not have done so without a high-performance liquid-propellant engine, or LPE, provided by a “foreign source.”

“Claims that the LPE is a North Korean product would be more believable if the country’s experts had in the recent past developed and tested a series of smaller, less powerful engines, but there are no reports of such activities,” the report, penned by missile expert Michael Elleman, read.

Citing available evidence, which can be sparse due to the secretive ways of the North and its isolation from the rest of the world, the report states that North Korea’s ability to jump from short- and medium-range missiles and a flawed type of intermediate-range missile to a more advanced and successful intermediate Hwasong-12 and an intercontinental ballistic missile, called Hwasong-14, could only have occurred with an LPE related to the Soviet RD-250 engines.

Stating that it was “less likely” that Russian engineers could have directly worked on the North’s missiles, the conclusion is drawn that the Soviet Rd-250 missiles and the requisite experience with that class of missile stemmed from factories either from the top Russian rocket engine manufacturer Energomash or the Ukraine’s KB Yuzhnoye.

“One has to conclude that the modified engines were made in those factories,” the report read.

The latter company has a factory based in Dnipro, Ukraine, located inside a part of the country attempting to break away and join Russia amidst a military conflict, and U.S. intelligence agencies believe the Soviet rockets at use by the North were likely made there as the state-owned factory has struggled, The New York Times reported.

Also, back in 2011, North Koreans were caught attempting to steal missile secrets from the factory and that the North may have tried to infiltrate the factory another time.

The rocket engines also are believed to be the very ones the North used to test two missiles last month, which has led to more threats from Kim and calls for diplomacy by China—the North’s sole ally—and even threats from U.S. President Donald Trump.

 

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Killing off the Witnesses – GOP Operative in Russia Scandal “Commits Suicide”

The coverup continues…Now the elimination of witnesses.

GOP operative who tried to get Hillary’s emails from Russian hackers committed suicide after talking to WSJ

 

The bizarre story of Peter W. Smith, the Republican donor who attempted to extract Hillary Clinton’s missing emails from Russian hackers profiled in the Wall Street J

ournal last month, just got even stranger.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Smith committed suicide in the days after speaking with the Journal about his quest for Clinton’s emails.

According to the report, Smith killed himself in a hotel room in Rochester, Minnesota on May 14, 2017 — 10 days after speaking to the Journal. He left a “carefully prepared file of documents” including his suicide note, which claimed he was in “ill health” and had an expiring life insurance policy. He was 81 at the time of his death.

The day after the story broke in late June, Shane Harris, the Journal reporter who broke the story, revealed nobody would tell him how Smith had died.

 

 

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All of Putin’s Bitch’s Men Who Lied About Meeting With Russian Spies

Halderman, Ehrlichman, Mitchell and Dean. It follows a pattern if you dig what I mean.

Halderman, Ehrlichman, Mitchell and Dean. It follows a pattern if you dig what I mean.

Halderman, Ehrlichman, Mitchell and Dean. It follows a pattern if you dig what I mean. 

From the H2O Gate Blues by Gil Scott Heron

It sounds like Treason, you know what I mean.

These top Trump associates have all lied about contacts with Russia — and the list is growing

The recent revelation that Donald Trump Jr. met with a Russian attorney with close ties to the Kremlin is just another in a long line of coincidental meetings that President Donald Trump’s friends, family, and associates had with Russians.

A number of people close to Trump have claimed they never had contact with Russian operatives — only for their denial to be proven wrong later. Below is a list of some of the most prominent people:

1. Donald Trump Jr.

The most recent in the list of Trump allies is Trump’s own son. In a March interview with the New York Times, he denied having any campaign-related meetings with Russian nationals.

“Did I meet with people that were Russian? I’m sure, I’m sure I did,” he said. “But none that were set up. None that I can think of at the moment. And certainly, none that I was representing the campaign in any way, shape or form.”

That was a lie.

The New York Times reported Sunday that Trump Jr., Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and former campaign chair Paul Manafort met with Natalia Veselnitskaya, who had claimed that she had information on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Trump Jr. has admitted he attended the meeting to see what the “dirt” was, but that the conversation resulted in nothing meaningful.

Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA) noted that the meeting is important because it was the first indication that someone in the campaign demonstrated they were willing to collude with Russians.

2. Jeff Sessions

While under oath in his Jan. 10 confirmation hearing, Attorney General Jeff Sessions was asked by Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) about any connections to Russians.

Sessions replied that he “did not have communications with the Russians” during the campaign. He also made the same statement in writing on the official questionnaire. He was told that any communications he had “as a senator” did not need to go on the form since that was as his capacity as an elected official.

That was a lie.

Sessions met with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak at least twice during 2016. One meet up was even photographed during the Republican National Convention, where Sessions was taking meetings for Trump. The second took place in September.

3. Mike Pence

No one has denied the Russian collusion or connections more publicly than Vice President Mike Pence, who was allegedly setup to lie on national television just before Trump was inaugurated. Specifically, Pence claimed that retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn never discussed sanctions with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during their introductory phone calls.

That was a lie.

While Pence might try to maintain plausible deniability, the evidence is stacking up that over and over Pence was warned about Flynn’s contacts with Russia. In May, it was revealed that Flynn was warned by the transition team about his contacts with the Russian Ambassador on the day then-President Barack Obama issued sanctions against Russia for hacking. Pence was the head of the transition team after Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ) was replaced.

Before the inauguration, Pence was sent a letter by Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) warning the transition that Flynn had concerning lobbying contracts.

It was also revealed that acting Attorney General Sally Yates warned the White House Counsel Don McGahn that Flynn’s communications with Russians put him in a compromised position. She had two in-person meetings and one phone call specifically because she was concerned about Pence’s comments on “Face the Nation.”

When Yates testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee in May, she said that she told White House officials on Jan. 26 that Pence deserved to know that Flynn had not been truthful about his communications with Russian officials. Flynn was not asked to resign until Feb. 13.

“Either they were criminally negligent — or they weren’t and they knew,” MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow said about Pence and the Trump team in March.

4. Michael Flynn

Flynn told anyone who asked him about his communications between the Russian Ambassador Kislyak that he didn’t recall the issue of sanctions coming up, but “isn’t completely certain.”

That was a lie.

It was further found that Flynn lied to investigators about payments from work that Flynn had done with Russians so that he could get his security clearance.

5. Jared Kushner

To gain his top-secret security clearance, Trump’s son-in-law was required to disclose any encounters with foreign government officials for the past seven years. Kushner did not list at least three such meetings.

Kushner’s attorney said that the omission of dozens of contacts with Russians was nothing more than an error. It’s also a lie.

Kushner’s first meeting that we know of came during that June 9, 2016 meeting with Veselnitskaya, in which he, Trump Jr. and Manafort were told the Kremlin-linked lawyer had damaging information on Clinton.

Another meeting was in December with Ambassador Kislyak and the third was with the leader of the Russian state-owned bank Vnesheconombank, which was arranged at Kislyak’s command.

Kushner’s attorney claims that the form was submitted prematurely and that they informed the FBI they would be sending supplemental information. In the absence of that information, Kushner was issued an interim clearance.

After the evidence was revealed that Kushner lied about the meetings, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, called for Kushner to lose his top-secret clearance until questions can be answered.

6. Paul Manafort

In a July 2016 interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week,” Paul Manafort claimed that there were no ties between him or Trump’s campaign and Putin.

“That’s absurd…there’s no basis to it,” Manafort said.

In another July interview, this time with CNN’s Erin Burnett, Manafort swore that any allegations about links between Putin and Trump, including his own personal role, was “crazy.”

Also around that time, Manafort was asked in a “CBS This Morning” interview if Trump had any financial relationships with Russian oligarchs.

“That’s what he said. That’s what I said, uh, that’s obviously what my position is,” Manafort stammered.

All of that was a lie.

In March, the Associated Press broke a story that Manafort “secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin a decade ago and proposed an ambitious political strategy to undermine anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics.”

The AP quoted “interviews with several people familiar with payments to Manafort and business records obtained by the AP,” who revealed that Manafort’s secret work for Putin. It “appears to contradict assertions by the Trump administration and Manafort himself that he never worked for Russian interests,” the AP said.

7. Carter Page

In a Feb. 2017 interview with Judy Woodruff on the PBS NewsHourforeign policy advisor Carter Page said that he had “no meetings” with Russian officials last year.

That was a lie.

Page later told MSNBC’s Chris Hayes, “I do not deny” meeting with the ambassador last summer in Ohio at the RNC convention.

“I will say I never met him anywhere outside of Cleveland. Let’s just say that much,” he added.

It was then revealed that Page went to Russia with a secret recording of Trump asking Putin to hack 2016 election to be hacked.

While close friend and ally of Roger Stone had communications with those involved in the Russian hack, he didn’t lie about it, in fact, he bragged about it. It is unclear if there are others close to Trump, but the list might expand as the investigations continue.

 

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Will NSA Mike Rogers, and James Comey Finally Drop the Rock on the Chumph?

There is a big difference between what the American Public knows about the Chumph’s treason, and what is still locked away under the steel vault of “Classified Information”. Even Congress has not seen all of the evidence. This has left a lot of wriggle room for the Chumph’s propagandists and co-dirtbags to deflect and deny.

Things are coming to a head. It is past time to “Open the Kimono” on that information.

Will Rogers and Comey finally cut loose with what they know?

We, the American people, are owed and answer.

 

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