Tag Archives: protest

Rev Mack Daddy is Back!

Rev James Manning, AKA Rev Mack Daddy is back at it again. This time due to demonstrations at his family “Church”, ATLAH. He calls himself a “Dr.” The Revered Doctor’s Phd was awarded to himself by himself, though his own “church” – not any accredited College or University, or even a Seminary. He is a former favorite of Sean Hannity’s Lawn Ornament Show…

Pastor Has Epic Freakout When He’s Protested For His Hate

Harlem hate pastor James Manning is back again — this time throwing an epic tantrum on the steps of his religious institution.

On Tuesday, the leader of ATLAH World Missionary Church reportedly interrupted a candlelight vigil put together by Harlem Against Violence, Homophobia, And Transphobia to spew some pretty horrific anti-queer sentiment. According to the Facebook event page, the group organized the vigil after deciding they “can’t sit back and let incitements to violence go unanswered.”

Manning’s speech escalates as the video goes on, spewing anti-LGBT rhetoric and hate in the face of peaceful protestors

“You’re Jesus haters. You are racist as well,” Manning says in the above video. “C’mon you faggots! All you lesbos! All you perverted people! All you dung eaters! Come over here? Do you think your chants are going to stop me? You can no more stop me than you can stop the power of the blood of Jesus. I declare the blood of Jesus against you faggots, you lesbos, you perverts, you sick-minded people. You are sick! You are demon possessed! Stop the demons now! Stop the demons now!”

Manning’s church, which is located in New York’s Harlem neighborhood, first made headlines in February 2014 when he posted a sign in front of his church reading, “Obama has released the homo demons on the black man. Look out black woman. A white homo may take your man.”

The sign has changed a number of times since to display equally offensive statements, including “Jesus would stone homos” and “Harlem is a sodomite free zone. Stop sodomizing our children in schools across America.”

Manning has also made some pretty bizarrely offensive public statements, including that Starbucks uses “sodomites’ semen” in their lattes. 

Our favorite line from this most recent outburst? Apparently not only are we “homos” or something “wretched, unbelievable, despicable, disgrace to humanity,” but also our “breath stinks of another man’s butthole!”

We’re sure Jesus would’ve loved that one.

Not sure what the Rev is all worked up over. After all the Rev spent 3 years in prison, by his own admission. According to Ben Carson – that would make Rev Mack Daddy as “sodomite” and “homo” hisself!

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Posted by on September 27, 2015 in Black Conservatives


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Making a Wrong Turn At Wesleyan

A white, military veteran student at Wesleyan wrote an Op-Ed critical of Black Lives Matter. That Op-Ed gained national attention not because of it’s content – but the violent reaction to the article by other students and activists at Wesleyan. Now – to be honest I read the article, and there really wasn’t anything new. As a conservative, the writer tried to tie the BLM movement into the number of murders in urban areas. That whole spiel has been debunked countless times in the last year, and he fact that the writer repeated it is more of an ode to conservative groupthink than pithy commentary. In other words, once a conservative gets a meme hammered into their head by conservative propagandist media…

It stays there, no matter the facts.

Shouldn’t be any cause for alarm or excitement – and it is the First Amendment right of every American to say what they think…Even if wrong.

Some activists at Wesleyan have gone way overboard in their denunciation of the said conservative. Proving another conservative meme that on college campuses, liberal groupthink is the only accepted norm. They have attacked the temerity of the School Paper for publishing a contrary view.

Wrong…Wrong…Wrong! Somebody please rein in these little HItler-Stalin-Putin wannabes! A conservative expressing an opinion in opposition to the beliefs of the minority community is in no way “threatening” anyone. I mean, back in my day you would find a death threat tacked to your dorm room door. The Civil Rights era was about courage. Nobody who has ever seen what those college kids endured at the Woolworth lunch counter has any question about that,

The best way to respond is to write a pro-BLM Op-Ed explaining the logical and factual fallacies of the conservative, and laying out what BLM is trying to accomplish..

Why exactly aren’t they doing that?


Activists Want Wesleyan Newspaper To Lose Funding For Running Op-Ed Critiquing Black Lives Matter

A group of activists at Wesleyan University want the school’s student government to defund the campus newspaper for publishing a controversial op-ed that criticized the Black Lives Matter movement.

At least 172 students, staff and recent alumni signed a petition asking that the Wesleyan Argus lose all funding until it meets a number of demands. Signatories pledged to boycott the Argus because it does not “provide a safe space for the voices of students of color and we are doubtful that it will in the future.”

The Sept. 14 op-ed in question was written by Bryan Stascavage, a 30-year-old Iraq war veteran who is a staff writer for the Argus and a member of the class of 2018. Stascavage criticized Black Lives Matter for its role in creating an atmosphere that facilitated and condoned violence, and questioned whether the movement had “the potential for positive change.”

He added, however, that the entire movement should not be stereotyped based on a few extreme members. Stascavage, who says he is a conservative, invoked as an example the “misguided” Kentucky clerk Kim Davis, who refused to hand out marriage licenses to same-sex couples to protest marriage equality. The op-ed argued that Davis, like the members of Black Lives Matter who Stascavage said were causing harm, was a fringe case who did not represent all the members of her cause.

Stascavage told The Huffington Post on Wednesday that he included Davis to show that more mainstream members of a movement may remain silent and allow hard-liners to monopolize the conversation.

“I’m guilty of my own criticism of the movement,” he said, “which is that I haven’t spoken out publicly.”

“I do support a lot of what the [Black Lives Matter] movement does. I was just questioning how they are going about it,” Stascavage continued. “I myself am not 100 percent sure of my own opinions. I write these pieces, put them out into the world and [look forward] to the responses. … On a college campus nuance sort of gets lost, and I realize that now.”

After the op-ed ran, critics demanded that the newspaper issue an apology. Instead, co-editors-in-chief Rebecca Brill and Tess Morgan wrote an editorial on Friday apologizing for the distress the op-ed had caused and the staff’s “carelessness in fact-checking,” but said the newspaper is “open to any writer who wants to share a view, whether or not the Opinion editors and the editors-in-chief agree with it.”

Wesleyan President Michael Roth wrote a blog post over the weekend defending the paper, saying the community should not “demand ideological conformity because people are made uncomfortable.”

The Argus was also planning a “Black Out” issue that would be entirely written by students of color. However, those plans were put to a halt when the staff received a petition Sunday calling for the paper to be boycotted until several demands were met. The organizers who brought the petition accused the newspaper of “supporting institutional racism.” Brill and Morgan declined to identify the organizers.

The petition’s demands include social justice training for all publications and open spaces on campus dedicated to “marginalized groups.”

The Argus covered the petition with a front-page story on Tuesday.…More…


Posted by on September 25, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter


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Black Protest Music …Then and Now

SO…Has the music died, or is there just another chapter? The author of this piece argues it’s come in a circle…

Sounds of Black Protest Then and Now

By William C. Anderson

The sounds Black people make are the brick and mortar of the United States. Literally. The enslaved African’s singing was a driving force for the free labor that built a young nation and put it at the forefront of empires. Historically, Black Americans have been amongst the primary influencers of music culture. The genres that were born of Black misery, triumph, endurance, protest, and expression have changed the way the entire world sounds. But it’s undeniable that many of these songs were and still are shaped by the fatigue of the constant protest that comes with Black existence.

As the son of a Black Southern Pentecostal minister, I’ve had the privilege of sitting among the serene sounds of praise that birthed a nation of noir notes. Just about every genre that has risen to popularity is from the offspring of the Black church. If you listen closely enough, you can hear Black American beginnings on this continent in our cultural songs: one part culture, one part community, one part family, one part fear of fire and brimstone. The tears that beg to line my face when I hear Mary Pickney’s “Down on Me”, Janie Hunters’ “Jonah”, or Mahalia Jackson’s “How I Got Over” retrace Fredrick Douglass’ words:

“I have sometimes thought that the mere hearing of those songs would do more to impress some minds with the horrible character of slavery, than the reading of whole volumes of philosophy on the subject could do….The mere recurrence to those songs, even now, afflicts me; and while I am writing these lines, an expression of feeling has already found its way down my cheek. To those songs I trace my first glimmering conception of the dehumanizing character of slavery.”

It’s important to note that the act of this singing was more than entertainment for plantation overseers or solely expressions of sadness. In its purest form, the slave’s singing was an act of protest. Its beauty and expression transcends the pervasive hell that was the environment that allowed them to be enslaved.

Black existence is an act of rebellion in and of itself, most especially in art. Black people have sung songs amid the persistent onslaught of struggle in the United States, though not exclusively. Enslaved Africans pioneered music like Cumbia, tango, and rumba across the Americas and integrated self-defense and music in Brazil with capoeira. Here in North America, all of the elements of our African diasporic kin’s musical instincts are present in our musical traditions, too.

Since the days of chattel slavery, we’ve heard as our songs have taken different shapes, changed. Jazz’s earliest beginnings in the Congo Square of New Orleans were moments of sanctification, through the allowance of Whites for them to congregate there, to evoke their traditions and make music. Jazz has been consistent in this way over decades. Artists like Nina Simone and Charles Mingus made outspokenness a part of their reputation over the years with songs like “Mississippi Goddam” and “Fables of Faubus”. Miles Davis became the embodiment of Black protest to many through his unwillingness to bend to White standards, insistence that Black women grace his album covers, and even making a tribute to “Black Jack Johnson”. Other imaginative artists like Sun Ra created other, better worlds for Black people through their music. Some artists like Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln infused what they could into Black protests through their art. In the song “Triptych: Prayer/Protest/Peace”, from the classic Black resistance jazz album We Insist, you can hear the waves of emotion Lincoln pours into her vocals. At one point in the song, she arguably sets a shrieking standard for punk rock before the genre officially existed, but not before evoking the symbolic moans of gospel and the blues. The revolutionary nature of Black music always comes back to that starting point.

The blues are Black survival music. While many songs deal with the everyday issues, others from blues’ earliest beginnings up to contemporary times are blatantly political. Three songs about my infamous home state of Alabama come to mind: J.B. Lenoir’s “Alabama”, Lead Belly’s “Scottsboro Boys”, and John Lee Hooker’s “Birmingham Blues”. You can find countless songs about Alabama because it was one of the starting points of the “great migration” Blacks made when they left the South fleeing oppressive violence. Furthermore, it was once the cradle of the civil rights movement and Black activism itself.

Much of the music that defines what most know as Black protest songs are civil rights era protest music. Songs like “We Shall Overcome”, “A Change Is Going to Come”, “We Shall Not Be Moved”, and “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Round” set the stage for what many millennials like myself would come to know as the movement songs. Documentaries like Eyes on the Prize were filled with these songs as soundtrack to the brutality of White supremacist violence against Black people.

I must admit that seeing these images of Black people singing while being beaten ruthlessly felt self-defeating and depressing as a child. The eternal words of Malcolm X, “stop singing and start swinging,” come to mind. Though there should not be any diminishing of the importance of any particular type of protest music, the current Black generation has moved toward a more confrontational approach….Read the rest of this outstanding piece here


Posted by on September 16, 2015 in Music, From Way Back When to Now


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And I Really Don’t Like the Curtains Either! Confederate Mania

Strange one. A Wisconsin man, enraged by the display of a Confederate Flag, barges into a woman’s home to remove it!

Wis. Man Arrested After ‘Shoving’ Woman to the Ground, Barging Into Her Home to Remove Confederate Flag: Report

This Wisconsin resident seems to really take issue with the Confederate flag.

Tajaun Boatner was arrested last week after he allegedly shoved past a woman, and barged into her home to remove the controversial flag that was hanging inside, the Daily Mail reports.

Boatner had reportedly spoken before to the woman, asking her to take down the flag, which she hung from her kitchen window. The woman moved the flag to the bathroom window, but Boatner was apparently not pleased at all.

The woman told police that she and Boatner got into a verbal argument before she ended up calling Boatner a racial slur, the Daily Mail reports. Boatner, at that point, had had enough and allegedly pushed past the woman and tore down the flag himself, according to the site.

The woman called police, who arrived at the scene and said that Boatner was combative. He allegedly struggled when they tried to handcuff him and refused to spread his legs so that they could pat him down for weapons. He allegedly continued to kick at officers as they put him in the police vehicle and attempted to close the door.

Boatner was charged with criminal trespassing, misdemeanor battery, disorderly conduct, misdemeanor theft and obstructing an officer.


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Posted by on August 14, 2015 in You Know It's Bad When...


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Take ’em Down! Woman Takes Down Confederate Flag at SC State House

This took a bit of courage. Thank you Bree, and your fellow protesters who removed the confederate flag from the South Carolina Statehouse.

The woman, identified as “Bree” in a news release by activist group Blackbird, did not act alone, but was part of a larger group of concerned citizens who wanted to see the flag come down. Bree is black, but the group she was part of is multiracial, according to the release.

“We removed the flag today because we can’t wait any longer,” Bree said in a statement. “We can’t continue like this another day. It’s time for a new chapter where we are sincere about dismantling white supremacy and building toward true racial justice and equality.”

The woman made it about halfway up the pole when authorities commanded her to come down, but she continued to go up and remove the flag, which was padlocked in place. She was arrested, along with a man and a woman who accompanied her to the Statehouse grounds in Columbia.

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Posted by on June 27, 2015 in Giant Negros, The Post-Racial Life


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Rabbis Arrested for Saying Prayers for Eric Garner

You KNOW when things are spinning out of control when the Police are arresting folks for saying a prayer.

Rabbis Recite Kaddish, Jewish Mourning Prayer, For Eric Garner, Later Arrested In NYC Protest

Four prominent New York rabbis were arrested during protests against police brutality and racial injustice on Thursday night, along with more than 200 others taken into custody throughout the city.

Rabbis Sharon Kleinbaum, Jill Jacobs, David Rosenn and Shai Held, along with Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, joined thousands of other protesters who took to the streets Wednesday and Thursday evenings in opposition to a grand jury’s decision not to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo for the death of Eric Garner.

Rabbi Jacobs told HuffPost by email that she and others arrived at the police station at roughly 11:30 p.m. and were held until 5:15 a.m. Friday morning. Despite the sleepless night, Jacobs said the protest was crucial to her as “a religious act” to highlight the “dignity of every single human being.”

“Rabbis and all Jews need to stand up and say that every single person is a creation in the divine image — that black lives matter,” Jacobs said. “We put our bodies on the line to show how crucial it is that the systems meant to protect us do protect all of us.”

The protest began at B’nai Jeshurun, a Jewish synagogue on 88th St., and proceeded along Broadway to 96th St. where the rabbis engaged in an act of civil disobedience. Many of the protesters had just attended a ceremony organized by Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ) at B’nai Jeshurun, during which Rabbi Kleinbaum was one of three recipients of the Rabbi Marshall T. Meyer Risk Taker Awards.

B’nai Jeshurun’s Rabbi J. Rolando Matalon said the ceremony was planned months in advance, and when the grand jury decision was announced it was clear to him and others that a demonstration of their concern was in order.

“It was all very peaceful and respectful but carried a great deal of concern and the commitment that we have to make serious change in our justice system and in our society to eradicate racism,” Matalon told HuffPost over the phone. “These incidents which are now a recurring pattern of the deaths of black men at the hands of police are issues of tremendous concern.”

The protesters recited the kaddish, a Jewish mourning prayer delivered in memory of loved ones — video of which several participants posted to Facebook and can be viewed below. During the prayer attendees read the names of more than 20 black individuals who had been killed by New York police, followed by the statement, “I am responsible.”

Matalon said the purpose of the kaddish was to deliver a “symbolic action” of community solidarity and to offer some hope for the future.

“This prayer is a prayer of hope,” Matalon explained. “It’s a prayer about the vision of the world redeemed. It was a desire to express in Jewish terms our outrage, our concern and also our vision for a brighter future.”

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Posted by on December 6, 2014 in The Post-Racial Life


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St Louis Baseball Fans and Mike Brown Protestors

Let you make your own mind up about this one –

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Posted by on October 8, 2014 in The New Jim Crow


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