Tag Archives: prosecution

Cops Who KIlled 6 YO in Louisiana Caught In a Web of Lies

Kind of amazing how Law enforcement can suddenly police itself when the wrong sort of person is killed. This article makes a few novice assumptions, It really isn’t surprising that the level of scrutiny is extraordinarily different in this case – than say the case of the man tasered to death while in handcuffs and shackles in Virginia, I wrote about in a previous post. The difference, quite simply…Is the race of the victim.

The Death of Jeremy Mardis and the Honesty of the Police

The officers who shot and killed a 6-year-old in Louisiana had been sued multiple times, and officials have now accused them of lying about every relevant detail of the incident.

Any time police shoot and kill a 6-year-old, there are bound to be tough questions. And officers in Louisiana had answers about the death of Jeremy Mardis on November 3.

They said that Mardis’s death was a tragic accident that occurred when police tried to serve a warrant on the boy’s father, Chris Few. They said Few had resisted that warrant. When he’d been cornered on a dead-end road after a chase, they said, he had tried to reverse and hit the officers. Then there was an exchange of gunshots, and Jeremy—buckled into the front seat—was tragically caught in the crossfire.

Yet almost none of that turned out to be true.

There appear to have been no outstanding warrants for Few. No gun was found in his truck. Officials said while two of the officers had claimed Few reversed his SUV and tried to ram them, that wasn’t actually true. When officials reviewed body-cam footage of the incident, they found Few actually had his arms in the air when the officers unloaded the barrage on the car. (Few survived the shooting that killed his son.)

“This was not a threatening situation for the police,”said Mark Jeansonne, Few’s attorney. Colonel Mike Edmonson, the superintendent of the Louisiana State Police, affirmed that after watching the footage.

“I’m not gonna talk about it, but I’m gonna tell you this,” he said. “It is the most disturbing thing I’ve seen and I will leave it at that …. As a father, much less the head of the State Police, [it was] extremely disturbing.”

That’s part of the reason, he said, they were charging the officers involved. Derrick Stafford and Norris Greenhouse Jr., who have been charged with second-degree murder and attempted second-degree, were working as city marshals; Stafford is also a Marksville police officer, while Greenhouse is a reserve officer. Two other marshals were also involved in the chase, and one of them was wearing the body camera that captured the shooting. That footage has not been released to the public.

The district attorney’s decision to charge them, and Edmonson’s comments, are an encouraging sign. Police are seldom charged in fatal shootings, and when they are, they are seldom convicted. There’s been a slight increase in the number of police charged this year, though experts say it’s too soon to tell whether that’s a result of closer scrutiny of police or simply a statistical blip.

Much of the attention given to Mardis’s death has been on the role of body cameras. Because the incident was caught on film, the officers’ accounts were debunked, and it’s clear from Edmonson’s comments that reviewing the footage had a strong effect on his own decision. There’s much that’s still unknown about how body cameras will effect policing and justice, and while this case is a single incident, the fact real footage can take the place of unreliable witness testimony is positive.

That’s an appropriate and important way to think about the story, but it’s not the only one. Another is about the honesty and trustworthiness of the police. Since the nation grants the police a near-monopoly on the use of deadly force, it’s important that officers be honest, reliable, and trustworthy. In the Mardis case, all signs so far suggest officers did not meet that standard.

Consider all the discrepancies in the case: the apparently nonexistent warrant, the story of Few resisting and trying to ram the marshals, the supposed threat to the officers, the suggestion that Few had hired a gun. The officers involved are alleged to have lied about the incident, and Edmonson also expressed concern about two of the officers’ refusal to speak to police. “It’s more concerning the longer it takes to talk to us,” he said. “All we want to know is what happened.” When The Guardian asked why they hadn’t been interviewed, Edmonson replied: “You’d have to ask them. We are trying to talk with them.” (It appears the shooting occurred amid a turf war between the city marshal and the police department, complicating matters.)

Both Stafford and Greenhouse had been subject to multiple prior complaints—what the Associated Press characterized as “a string of civil lawsuits.” Stafford was sued for two incidents in 2012, one in which he allegedly shocked a woman with a stun gun while she was handcuffed and another in which he was accused of breaking a girl’s arm while breaking up a fight on a school bus. In 2014, a jury awarded $50,000 to a man who said Stafford had arrested him as payback for filing a complaint against him. Stafford was indicted twice for rape in 2011. In one of those cases, he was charged with raping a 15-year-old in 2004. Both charges were dismissed, but it’s not clear why…Read More Here

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Posted by on November 12, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter


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Gun Crazy…Woman Threatens to Shoot Man For Asking for a Light

Once again we see the result of NRA and conservative media fearmongering…This woman needs minimally to have her Gun Permit pulled – and shouldn’t be a gun owner. Pulling a gun for no reason, and aiming it at a group of people, including a child is reason enough. She quite simply – isn’t psychologically stable enough to be allowed on the street with a gun.

And the guy wasn’t asking for a cigarette…He was asking for light for cigarettes he had just bought.

Tenn. woman busted after pointing gun at black man asking for a cigarette from 10 feet away

A 67-year-old Tennessee woman was arrested and charged with aggravated assault after drawing her gun on a black man authorities said posed no threat to her, WTVF-TV reported.

“I have never been so afraid of anything in my whole life I don’t think,” Sherry McLain said of the encounter in a Walmart parking lot last weekend. “This guy is the bad guy and I’m the one in handcuffs walking away.”

According to the Murfeesboro Daily News Journal, security footage shows 52-year-old James Crutchfield walking past McLain and turning toward her, but not behaving toward her in a threatening manner.

McLain has insisted that Crutchfield approached her even after she drew her handgun and told him to stop. But the footage actually shows him backing away from her with his hands up before approaching another woman, Diane Miller, and telling her to call the police before running into the store. WTVF reported that Crutchfield never got within 10 feet of McLain during the encounter.

Crutchfield told police that he had asked McLain if she had a cigarette lighter since he had just bought cigarettes in the store, only for her to brandish her weapon. The footage reportedly shows McLain lowering her gun after he got away from her, only to raise it again when Crutchfield approached Miller and a child.

Miller’s daughter, Keeley Benoit, corroborated the police’s account of the incident, saying that “the gun was being pointed at the three of them and [McLain] says, ‘I’m going to shoot you. I’m going to kill you.’”

McLain, who has a legal permit for the gun, faced a $15,000 bond and was also charged with reckless endangerment.

“What are we supposed to do if we can’t protect ourselves?” she asked. “I’m 67 years old.”

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Posted by on November 10, 2015 in Faux News, The Definition of Racism


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Impact of BLM – Prosecutions of Officers Alleged Guilty of Shootings Up

Why are Republicans like Chris Christie so adamant in their opposition to BLM?

Because it is working. It is causing a new look not only at violence perpetrated by bad Police, but at the entire judicial system as well as the carceral state. It threatens to tear down a supporting pillar of white privilege and system of disenfranchising minority voters.

Prosecution Of U.S. Police For Killings Surges To Highest In Decade

A dozen officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter this year resulting from shootings.

The number of U.S. police officers charged in fatal shootings has hit the highest level in a decade in 2015, new research shows, driven by greater scrutiny over use of deadly force.

Public outrage over the deaths of black men at the hands of police in New York, Missouri and elsewhere have spurred prosecutions. Police body cameras and bystanders’ videos also have helped bring cases, but even with the upturn, only a small percentage of police killings result in charges, lawyers and analysts say.

A dozen officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter this year resulting from shootings, up from an average of about five a year from 2005 to 2014, said Philip Stinson, an associate professor of criminology at Ohio’s Bowling Green State University. He sifted court records and media reports as part of research for the Justice Department on police crimes and arrests.

The 2015 number does not include six Baltimore officers facing trial for the death of Freddie Gray. The 25-year-old black man died in April from a spinal injury after he was arrested and bundled in a transport van. Four of the officers face murder or manslaughter charges.

None of the officers has been convicted, and over the previous decade just one in five officers charged was found guilty, said Stinson, a former police officer.

Stinson, attorneys and criminologists say it is too early to tell if the upturn indicates a permanent change or is a statistical fluke.

“We can tell for one year, but is that just an anomaly or is it a trend?” said Stinson.

The prosecutions represent only a small fraction of the killings by U.S. police. A Washington Post database last week showed 796 fatal police shootings this year, and one maintained by the Guardian newspaper recorded 927 deaths from all causes.


The United States has lacked official numbers on police-related deaths, and Attorney General Loretta Lynch said this month that the Justice Department was trying to improve data on the use of force by police. A study for the department said in March that less than half of arrest-related deaths had been reported under two programs.

At least two states, California and Texas, and several local jurisdictions, including Houston, Dallas and Fairfax County, Virginia, have started public databases on police-related shootings or deaths.

Ezekiel Edwards, director of the criminal law reform project at the American Civil Liberties Union, said mayors, prosecutors and lawmakers were under increasing public pressure to act when a questionable police shooting occurred.

“It’s not that there has been this massive uptick in civilian deaths. It’s just that there has been this massive uptick in scrutiny and protests,” he said.

Widespread protests over police brutality exploded over the August 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by an officer in Ferguson, Missouri. A grand jury declined to indict the officer, Darren Wilson, and the Justice Department cleared him of civil rights violations.

Besides the Baltimore police, the officers charged this year include:

— Michael Slager, a former North Charleston, South Carolina, patrolman facing trial over the death of a black man who ran from a traffic stop and was shot in the back. A bystander caught the incident on video.

— Ray Tensing, an ex-University of Cincinnati officer, charged with murder for the July death of an unarmed black motorist during an off-campus traffic stop. Tensing’s body camera showed the stop and the shooting.

— Stephen Rankin, a former Portsmouth, Virginia, officer, faces a first-degree murder charge for the April shooting of a black teenager in a Walmart parking lot….The rest here


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There Is Justice For the Rich And Powerful In One Last Place In the World!

The United States is now ranked on 22nd out of 168 Countries in having the least corruption. One of the reasons is the rich and powerful in the United States very seldom go to jail for their crimes, or receive hand slaps.

Nice to see in Israel, despite there being little justice for Arabs living in the country…

There is still justice for the high and mighty.

(Ignore the dumb arsed Cisco Commercial! From my view they are part of the problem here in the US.)


Posted by on December 30, 2010 in News


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First Prosecution Under New Hate Crimes Law

A New Mexico town is the honorary home of 3 men who will be the first prosecuted under the new Hate Crimes Legislation. The town is trying to get past a bloody history of Hate Crimes. Perhaps this prosecution, like the first successful prosecution of KKK criminals during the Civil Rights era will serve notice to the scumbags …

Swastika Brand

Swastika case another race issue for NM town

Three friends had just finished their shifts at a McDonald’s when prosecutors say they carried out a gruesome attack on a customer: They allegedly shaped a coat hanger into a swastika, placed it on a heated stove and branded the symbol on the arm of the mentally disabled Navajo man.

Authorities say they then shaved a swastika on the back of the 22-year-old victim’s head and used markers to scrawl messages and images on his body, including “KKK,” ”White Power,” a pentagram and a graphic image of a penis.

The men have become the first in the nation to be charged under a new law that makes it easier for the federal government to prosecute people for hate crimes.

The case also marked the latest troubling race-related attack in this New Mexico community, prompting a renewed focus among local leaders on improving relations between Navajos and whites.

The defendants are accused of violating the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act and could face 10 years in prison if convicted. The sentences could be extended to life if the government proves kidnapping occurred.

Federal prosecutors say they were able to bring the case because the 2009 law eliminated a requirement that a victim must be engaged in a federally protected activity, such as voting or attending school, for hate crime charges to be leveled.

The law also expanded civil rights protections to include violence that is based on gender, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity.

The swastika branding has also put the spotlight back on Farmington, a predominantly white community of about 45,000 residents near the Navajo Nation.

Farmington leaders signed a historic agreement earlier this month with the Navajo Nation in which both sides pledged to work toward improving race relations.

The signing ceremony was held at City Hall and included a blessing by a Navajo medicine man who prayed for a strong, stable and long-running agreement. City officials sat cross-legged on the floor alongside Navajos during the service.

“Mistreatment of fellow humans is a learned behavior. The only thing that will address that directly is education,” said Duane “Chili” Yazzie, chairman of the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission and a participant in the signing ceremony.

The signing was significant because it put into writing what both sides have long expressed. Negotiations took almost a year as the parties discussed wording and language.

Navajo and city leaders agree race relations have improved dramatically since May 1974, when the beaten and burned bodies of three Navajo men were found north of town. Three white high school students were linked to the crime and sent to reform school, outraging the Navajo community.

More recently there were other events.

There was the 2006 kidnapping and beating of a Navajo man by three young white men. Six days later, a Navajo man was shot to death in a Walmart parking lot by a Farmington police officer responding to a domestic violence call.

The shooting was ruled justified by sheriff’s investigators and the Justice Department determined there was no basis for a civil rights investigation. Still, the incident touched off a round of protests by angry Navajos.

When a New Mexico advisory committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights visited Farmington in 2004 to assess the city’s progress 30 years after the canyon murders, several speakers at a forum complained that harassment of Indians by white youth continues.

In the current case, defendants William Hatch of Fruitland and Paul Beebe and Jesse Sanford, both of Farmington, have pleaded not guilty. Their court-appointed lawyers have declined comment. They have also been charged with state crimes.

Yazzie and Mayor Tommy Roberts said despite the history of problems, there is evidence of substantial progress in Farmington, including the recent agreement between city and tribal leaders.


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Posted by on November 30, 2010 in The New Jim Crow


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FDIC Begins Bank Prosecutions

Seems like it took forever, but the FDIC has finally begun to go after the tip of the iceberg of Bank Fraud.

Now, if the SEC will only follow suit with Wall Street.

One for You, Two for Me...One for You, Three for Me...


U.S. Sets 50 Bank Probes

FDIC Steps Up Investigations at Failed Lenders; ‘These Numbers Will Increase’

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. is conducting about 50 criminal investigations of former executives, directors and employees at U.S. banks that have failed since the start of the financial crisis.

The agency responsible for dealing with bank failures is stepping up its effort to punish alleged recklessness, fraud and other criminal behavior, as U.S. officials did in the wake of the savings-and-loan crisis a generation ago. More than 300 banks and savings institutions have failed since the start of 2008, but just a few have led to criminal charges being filed against bank officials.

In an interview, Fred W. Gibson, deputy inspector general at the FDIC, which works with the Federal Bureau of Investigation to investigate crime at financial institutions, said the probes involve failed banks of all sizes in cities across the U.S. The FDIC is also ramping up civil claims to recover money from former bankers at busted lenders. He declined to identify any of the people or banks under investigation.



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Posted by on November 17, 2010 in American Greed


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Orange Tapdance Award! Tom Delay Investigation Dropped

Tom Delay on Dancing With The Stars

The Obama Administration Justice Department prosecution of Republican political crime bosses has led to the need for the creation of a new type of orange finery beyond the normal orange jumpsuit these guys should have been wearing…

Tom DeLay cleared in federal probe, but Texas charges loom

After a six-year investigation, the Justice Department ended its probe into former House majority leader Tom DeLay’s relations with convicted ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff, without bringing criminal charges. The announcement did not come from the Justice Department, which typically does not comment on investigations that do not result in charges, but from Mr. DeLay’s legal team, as reported by Politico. “Six years is a long time, and I’m sure he wishes it had happened years ago,” Richard Cullen, attorney for the former Texas Republican lawmaker, told Politico Monday. The broad investigation of Mr. Abramoff and his connections stirred up a storm of allegations and led to convictions or charges for some 20 House staff, former lobbyists, and Bush administration officials. One member of Congress, Rep. Robert Ney (R) of Ohio, former chair of the House Administration Committee, was convicted for doing official favors for Mr. Abramoff in exchange for campaign contributions, trips, gifts, sports tickets, and meals. House Democrats used such allegations as Exhibit A in their successful bid to take back the House in 2006. Other members of Congress, including former Sen. Conrad Burns (R) of Montana, Rep. J. D. Hayworth (R) of Arizona, and Rep. Richard Pombo (R) of California lost their 2006 reelection bids in the midst of allegations of involvement in such pay-to-play schemes, but, like DeLay, were not subsequently charged with a crime.

So what was Tom using to Tango away from the Justice Department?

The Orange Tap Dance Award - To Tap Dance Away From Federal Prosecution

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Posted by on August 16, 2010 in Stupid Democrat Tricks


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