Tag Archives: Police

Pregnant Woman Shot and Killed By Police in Washington

Purportedly while sitting beside her two small children…

Native American single mom Renee Davis was five months pregnant when she was killed by deputies on Friday (

Pregnant Washington woman shot and killed by deputies during ‘wellness check’ on tribal land

A Washington woman who was five months pregnant was shot and killed by King County Sheriff’s deputies Friday night on Muckleshoot tribal lands. Now her loved ones want to know why.

The dead woman’s former foster sister Danielle Bargala told the Seattle Times that Renee Davis, 23, had struggled with depression and mental illness before her fatal run-in with police on Friday.

“It’s really upsetting because it was a wellness check,” said Bargala, who is a Seattle University law student. “Obviously, she didn’t come out of it well.”

A relative of Davis called the sheriff’s department on Friday after receiving an alarming text from the mother of three. Police records show that officers responding to a call about a potential suicide encountered a woman with a handgun and two small children in the house when they arrived at 6:30 in the evening.

What happened next, Bargala said, is still in question, but at the end, Davis — who was an avid outdoorswoman of Native American heritage — lay dead of gunshot wounds. The children, 2 and 3 years old, were unharmed. Davis’ third child, a 5-year-old boy, was at a neighbor’s house.

Bargala said she didn’t know that Davis owned a handgun, but she did own a hunting rifle.

“She loved hunting,” she said.

Davis loved working outdoors. She participated in a fisheries training program and recently had been working as a teacher’s aide.

“She was such a soft person,” said Bargala. The two grew up in a family of seven children. Bargala’s parents had three children of their own and took in four foster children.

Seattle lawyer Ryan Dreveskracht told the Times that unfortunately, these scenarios are all too common when police interact with people struggling with mental illness.

Dreveskracht is currently representing the family of a mentally ill man who was killed by police. He said that while Seattle Police are being trained in de-escalation techniques, most police forces in the state are not.


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Posted by on October 24, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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Cop Relieved for Showing His Pointy Hood

This is stuck on stupid. A cop who is supposed to uphold the law, joining an extremist right wing group (and bringing it to work) which in various turns is both racist and opposes the US Government, losing his job…

Good Riddance!

Anne Arundel officer suspended after Oath Keepers hat spotted in cruiser

Anne Arundel Co Police car.jpg

Anne Arundel County police say an officer has been suspended for displaying a hat bearing the name of an anti-government group in a cruiser.Media outlets report that department spokesman Lt. Ryan Frashure confirmed Tuesday that the officer’s police powers were suspended pending the outcome of an internal investigation. A photo of the hat, which displayed the name “Oath Keepers,” was shared with the department Monday after it was spotted in a grocery store parking lot.

The organization is made up of current and former military and police who vow to uphold the Constitution, but it has caught the attention of hate-watch groups.

Chief Timothy Altomare says the hat appears to violate the department’s policy against officers espousing political beliefs and such conduct won’t be tolerated.

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Posted by on October 20, 2016 in Domestic terrorism


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How the Police Became the Military – “Do Not Resist” Documentary

How the Police became a military force within the US…The US Army cannot operate within American borders unless Martial Law is declared. The National Guard, which reports to the State Governors can be called out in major emergencies by the Governors. Starting in  the mid 90’s the US Army began giving surplus equipment to Police Forces. This included automatic weapons, armored cars and vehicles, Military body armor, electronic surveillance systems , and even grenades and grenade launchers.

The Police in some areas have effectively become the Military, using all  this new weaponry against citizens. The Military’s job isn’t to arrest people. They will tell you quite frankly their job is to “kill people and break things”. Which is why there is so much Police violence.

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Posted by on October 19, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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President of Nation’s Largest Police Association Apologizes For Past Treatment of Minorities

Showing that there is Police leadership which aren’t the boneheads who seem to grab the right wing press…

These are good guys to work with. After the Haiti earthquake worked with them on donating Police Radio Systems to replace those that had been destroyed. Been wondering when they would step up.

U.S. police chiefs group apologizes for ‘historical mistreatment’ of minorities

Terrence M. Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and chief of the Wellesley, Mass., police. On Monday he offered an apology for historic mistreatment of minorities by police. (IACP)

Terrence M. Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and chief of the Wellesley, Mass., police. On Monday he offered an apology for historic mistreatment of minorities by police.

The president of America’s largest police organization on Monday issued a formal apology to the nation’s minority population “for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in society’s historical mistreatment of communities of color.”

Terrence M. Cunningham, the chief of police in Wellesley, Mass., delivered his remarks at the convention in San Diego of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, whose membership includes 23,000 police officials in the United States. The statement was issued on behalf of the IACP, and comes as police executives continue to grapple with tense relationships between officers and minority groups in the wake of high-profile civilian deaths in New York, South Carolina, Minnesota and elsewhere, the sometimes violent citizen protests which have ensued as well as the ambush killings of officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge.

Police chiefs have long recognized the need to maintain good relations with their communities, of all races, and not allow an us-versus-them mentality to take root, either in their rank-and-file officer corps or in the neighborhoods where their citizens live. Cunningham’s comments are an acknowledgement of police departments’ past role in exacerbating tensions and a way to move forward and improve community relations nationwide. Two top civil rights groups on Monday commended Cunningham for taking an important first step in acknowledging the problem.

“Events over the past several years,” Cunningham said, “have caused many to question the actions of our officers and has tragically undermined the trust that the public must and should have in their police departments…The history of the law enforcement profession is replete with examples of bravery, self-sacrifice, and service to the community. At its core, policing is a noble profession.”

But Cunningham added, “At the same time, it is also clear that the history of policing has also had darker periods.” He cited laws enacted by state and federal governments which “have required police officers to perform many unpalatable tasks…While this is no longer the case, this dark side of our shared history has created a multigenerational — almost inherited — mistrust between many communities of color and their law enforcement agencies.”

Cunningham continued, “While we obviously cannot change the past, it is clear that we must change the future…For our part, the first step is for law enforcement and the IACP to acknowledge and apologize for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in society’s historical mistreatment of communities of color.”

He concluded, “It is my hope that, by working together, we can break this historic cycle of mistrust and build a better and safer future for us all.”

Jeffery Robinson, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, applauded Cunningham’s statement. “It seems to me that this is a very significant admission,” Robinson said, “and a very significant acknowledgement of what much of America has known for some time about the historical relationship between police and communities of color. The fact someone high in the law enforcement community has said this is significant and I applaud it because it is long overdue. And I think it’s a necessary first step to them trying to change these relationships.”

Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, said, “I think Chief Cunningham correctly identifies the need to acknowledge and apologize as a first step, and I don’t want to diminish how important the first step is,” because many police organizations have been reluctant to grapple with racial issues. She said the Legal Defense Fund has been speaking with the IACP about the role the Legal Defense Fund can play in improving policing. “They know that there’s a problem,” Ifill said. “They know that it’s a complicated and difficult one. They know there are problems in their own departments. And now we’re trying to take tentative steps toward what we hope will be productive measures.”

After his comments, Cunningham told The Post in an e-mail that, “We have 16,000 police chiefs and law enforcement officials gathered here in San Diego and it is an important message to spread. Communities and law enforcement need to begin a healing process and this is a bridge to begin that dialogue. If we are brave enough to collectively deliver this message, we will build a better and safer future for our communities and our law enforcement officers. Too many lives have been lost already, and this must end. It is my hope that many other law enforcement executives will deliver this same message to their local communities, particularly those segments of their communities that lack trust and feel disenfranchised.”

The IACP members present for Cunningham’s speech gave him a standing ovation, IACP spokeswoman Sarah Guy said. Cunningham made the remarks on behalf of the membership, Guy said….Read the rest here

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Posted by on October 18, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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Cops Raid House …Because Man Had Dreds

Guy is at home asleep with his wife and two kids. Suddenly there are flashing lights everywhere and a cop on a bullhorn shouting for him to come out with his hands up….

Cops pull innocent family from home at gunpoint because dad has dreadlocks like murder suspect

An Illinois family was the subject of a racist police raid on Friday as officers were searching for a murder suspect. The police, the DeKalb County sheriff’s deputies, and the Sycamore police showed up at the family home of Eric Nabors and surrounded the place with guns and dogs, according to the Elgin Patch.

The family was in bed when police surrounded their home with rifles and pulled the man and his wife, their son, 10, and daughter, 13 out of their home with their hands up.

The father, Eric, apparently matched the profile of the man they were searching for; however, Nabors was also a victim of racial profiling by police.

He told ABC News, “I stepped out and I took not even three steps out the door, and I see a whole bunch of people running saying, ‘He’s got a gun.’”

He continued, “I didn’t have nothing on me, nothing in my hand, I don’t own a gun. After they searched me, then they told me what they were looking for. ‘We’re looking for a black male suspect with dreads for a possible homicide in DeKalb.’”

Nabors said the police did not believe he was innocent until running his name through their system. His daughter Briana told ABC 7 Chicago, “It’s terrifying to see like all the guns being pointed at me and my family and my brother.”

The kids’ mother Deana Brown told the station, “I feel like it could have been better done. They could have had better intel, they could have had a better description before they put my family through all of this.” The family is now considering whether to file a lawsuit.

Police arrested the two suspects the next day. Both were charged with murder in the first degree and weapons offenses.

In 2016, police have killed a total of 856 people, according to the Guardian‘s The Counted. Of the total victims, 204 are black. Racialized police violence and profiling has been an serious issue facing the country.

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Posted by on October 17, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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Black Man Literally Gets Arrested for Walking Down the Street

UN-freaking believable. This sidewalks in this section of the road were closed while under repair. A cop pulls up and arrests a black man for walking along the white lane to get past the construction.


Video Shows Black Man Being Arrested For Apparently Walking In Street

The NAACP has since slammed the police officer’s actions as “dehumanizing and degrading.”

Cell phone video of a black man’s arrest is drawing outrage with footage showing the man being handcuffed after allegedly walking in the street where a sidewalk was under construction.

In the seven-minute video, posted to YouTube Wednesday, the man is first seen arguing with a white Edina, Minnesota officer who tightly holds the back of his jacket in an apparent attempt to prevent him from running away.

“You’re walking down the middle of the street,” the officer says in the video, as he appears to forcefully pull the man toward the center lane and around a parked car.

“I’m on the damn white line!” answers the man. “You can’t just put your hands on me like that!”

The woman filming the incident is repeatedly heard suggesting to the police officer that, instead of arresting the man, he show him where to walk.

“He’s scared, sir. It’s scary,” the woman calls out during the heated scene.“It’s because he’s black,” she adds, in a lower voice. The Minnesota NAACP identified the woman as Janet Rowles.

The city, responding to the video in a statement Friday, confirmed that one of two surrounding sidewalks were closed because of construction but said that the video only captured a portion of the incident….

“Watching that video and seeing a black man being manhandled and emasculated by Edina Police was not only painful and humiliating, it was a vivid reminder that blacks are still too-often seen as second class citizens in the State of Minnesota and in this nation,” stated Nekima Levy-Pounds, a civil rights attorney and president of the Minneapolis NAACP. “It is sad to say, but that man in the video could easily have been the next Philando Castile or Jamar Clark, two unarmed black men who were killed by police within the last year.”

Rowles, the woman who filmed the scene, also spoke out against the man’s treatment, which she called “overzealous.”

“There was absolutely no reason for the officer to stop him from walking. I easily passed him in my vehicle because he was hugging the right side next to the construction, literally walking on the white line that marks the shoulder,” she said in the NAACP’s release. “I have no interest in vilifying the police, but obviously I got out of my car in the first place because I perceive the pedestrian might not get treated fairly because of his ethnicity.”

In addition to asking for an apology, the NAACP has asked that an outside investigation be conducted into the incident and that the officer be suspended without pay.

The police department could not immediately be reached for comment Sunday; nor could the man whom the NAACP identified as the person arrested.


Posted by on October 16, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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Justice Department to Track Police Brutality

This one is badly needed, A centralized database clearing up the fog around Police actions…

Image result for number of  people killed by police

Justice Department Will Track Police Killings And Use Of Force

Promising information that is more standardized and complete than has previously been available, Attorney General Loretta Lynch says the Department of Justice will collect data on the police use of deadly force in the line of duty.

Lynch’s announcement amplifies a statement by FBI Director James Comey at the end of September, when he told a congressional panel that the bureau is in the process of setting up a database that can track police killings and other use of force during interactions with the public.

The Justice Department plans to have a pilot program collecting data in early 2017.

“Accurate and comprehensive data on the use of force by law enforcement is essential to an informed and productive discussion about community-police relations,” Lynch said today. “The initiatives we are announcing today are vital efforts toward increasing transparency and building trust between law enforcement and the communities we serve.”

In addition to collecting data, the FBI’s pilot program will study the methodology used to collect that information. The agency’s announcement of the pilot program also calls for public comment — “from all interested parties, including local, state, tribal and federal law enforcement, civil rights organizations and other community stakeholders.”

A lack of a national database became a sticking point in recent years, particularly after a string of high-profile cases in which unarmed black men died at the hands of police. Attempts to fill that void have included the website Fatal Encounters, as well as aWashington Post database that tracks how many people are shot and killed by police. So far in 2016, the Post reports that law enforcement officers have killed 754 people.

According to the FBI, “The pilot study participants are expected to include the largest law enforcement agencies, as well as the FBI, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Drug Enforcement Administration and U.S. Marshals Service.”

The push for collecting such data has also brought legislative action. From the Justice Department announcement:

“In 2014, Congress passed the Death in Custody Reporting Act (DCRA), which required states and federal law enforcement agencies to submit data to the department about civilians who died during interactions with law enforcement or in their custody (whether resulting from use of force or some other manner of death, such as suicide or natural causes) and authorized the Attorney General to impose a financial penalty on non-compliant states.”

Noting that the law doesn’t require the collection of nonlethal force, the Justice Department says it will also work to amass that data.

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Posted by on October 13, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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