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As Expected – Sessions Sides With Murderers and Racists in Police Murders of Citizens

AG Jeff Sessions just ordered the DOJ to “play nice” in investigating evidence of Police criminality. Setting up a system of holding Police Departments to a lower level of accountability than your average criminal. Just another racist POS in the Trump debacle.

What Sessions is protecting is the use of the Police as a method to oppress and to deny Civil Rights to minorities, turning the law enforcement and criminal justice system back into just another tool of the New Jim Crow to prevent minority voting, to assure the school to jail pipeline runs smoothly, and to deny equal rights to minorities sunder the law.

Sessions seeks to protect the murderers of the unarmed, police abuses of power, and the overboard, and to establish the Chumph’s Police State.

Sessions Signals A Rollback On Justice Department’s Police Reform Efforts

Image result for Police State“Since when did protecting civil rights take the back seat to making sure police officers don’t get their feelings hurt?” a former DOJ official says.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has ordered a wide-ranging review of the Justice Department’s efforts to rein in rogue law enforcement agencies, putting the future of police reform in doubt.

In a March 31 “Memorandum Supporting Federal, State, Local and Tribal Law Enforcement” that was released Monday, Sessions set out several principles for the Justice Department’s posture toward local law enforcement. While local agencies should “protect and respect the civil rights of all members of the public,” the memo states, “local control and local accountability are necessary for effective local policing,” and managing non-federal law enforcement agencies “is not the responsibility of the federal government.”

The memo also stresses that the “misdeeds of individual bad actors should not impugn or undermine the legitimate and honorable work that law enforcement officers and agencies perform in keeping American communities safe.” (Sessions indicated in February that he had not read the Justice Department’s reports on Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore but that he believed they were based on anecdotes and not well supported.)

The Sessions memo orders a review of “existing or contemplated consent decrees” to make sure they comply with the goals laid out in the memo.

Even before his confirmation, Sessions had indicated he was skeptical of the Civil Rights Division’s pattern-and-practice investigations, which focus on widespread constitutional abuses rather than individual incidents. The Trump administration more broadly has sought to portray itself as friendly to law enforcement.

In seeking to comply with Session’s memo, Justice Department lawyers sought Monday to delay a hearing on the ongoing case in Baltimore. They requested time as they evaluate whether the consent decree under consideration in Baltimore would “advance the safety and protection of the public, promote officer safety and morale, protect and respect the civil rights of all members of the public, respect local control of law enforcement, are rooted in timely and reliable statistics on crime and criminals, and do not impede recruitment and training of officers,” as laid out in Sessions’ memo.

Image result for Police StateKristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, called the Justice Department’s request to delay the consent decree progress in Baltimore “truly shocking.”

“Attorney General Jeff Sessions is undermining and obstructing extensive efforts that have been made to promote policing reform in a small set of the most broken police departments in our country,” Clarke said in a statement. “In a 163-page report, the Justice Department laid out extensive evidence of unconstitutional policing practices including unlawful stops, searches, and arrests; racial disparities in the rates of stops, searches and arrests; and use of excessive force. The mayor, the community and the police department all support reform, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the obstacle standing in the way. This administration is making clear its intent to delay and obstruct federal civil rights enforcement across our country.”

Sessions’ memo also places a potential consent decree in the city of Chicago in jeopardy. A report on the Chicago Police Department released just before the end of the Obama administration found widespread constitutional abuses that had damaged the relationship between law enforcement and the community in the city, deepening the city’s public safety issues. President Donald Trump frequently brought up Chicago’s violent crime problem on the campaign trail, laying the blame for the city’s issues on former President Barack Obama.

Christy Lopez, who served as deputy chief of the Special Litigation Section of the Civil Rights Division and oversaw DOJ’s Ferguson report, told The Huffington Post that sometimes reform isn’t possible without the Justice Department’s involvement.

“These decrees create the space for innovation and reform that just doesn’t happen otherwise. So much good work has been done, and is being done, because of these decrees. It is terrible to think of all the amazing things that won’t happen in policing if the AG gets his way,” Lopez said.

Lopez, the daughter of a police officer, worked on DOJ police investigations in several cities, including Ferguson. She said she’s concerned that Sessions is “second-guessing and undoing the enforcement decisions of career staff” for “explicitly” political reasons.

“Since when did protecting civil rights take the back seat to making sure police officers don’t get their feelings hurt?” she said. “Good police officers everywhere support the work of the Civil Rights Division. They know this is a giant step backwards for our country.”

Image result for Police State

 
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Posted by on April 4, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter, Daily Chump Disasters

 

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Eye in the Sky Spying By Baltimore Police

Those of you involved in technology have probably figured it out, but a lot of the fancy gizmos and technology you see on the various”tech oriented” TV shows…

Doesn’t exist.

Technology, and the use of technology has been a moral issue for inventors and technologists since the days of the development of the Atomic Bomb. Not that the inventors of a lot of this stuff are ethicists but – it is a conversation at least some of us have.

After 9-11 and Katrina, my company was developing technology which would be capable to restoring communications over a disaster area in a matter of hours. The concept was based on putting a new type of radio communications system which could reconfigure itself by software command in either a tethered to the ground, or a geo-stationary blimp. Now, I am sure everyone is familiar with the Zeppelins of the 1930’s and the Hindenburg.

One of the big Gub’ment agencies caught on to what we were doing, and approached us to help one of BIG Gub’ment contractors on building their “Eye in the Sky” project. The idea was to mount a very high resolution video camera in a geostationary blimp over New Orleans, and tie it to behavioral analysis software. “Behaviorial” software was just being developed at that point. What it does is identify possible criminal activity by the actions of the people the camera sees. The technical problem in this case being getting the video feed  back down to the ground, and the equipment to make that happen not being too heavy to be lifted by the blimp. My partners and I figured out it was technically doable, but involved creating a bit of technology that didn’t exist yet.

First meeting, the Gub’ment guys stands up and explains what they want to do. Which was essentially put the entire city under surveillance and use the pattern recognition software to identify “bad guys” and people up to nefarious deeds. The problem being the system would spy on each and every citizen in the entire city constantly. The guy from the company developing the camera stands up and starts describing the new camera, which includes and ability to look through buildings (yes that exists).

I look at my partner, he looks at me…And I say I’m not doing this. This gives the government the ability to peer into anyone’s home, bedroom, or office without their permission, or even so much as a warrant based on criminal activity. This is unconstitutional.

We walked out and refused to do the work. It was the end of us ever doing work for these people…But that was fine.

Now I see in Baltimore some scumbag has reconstituted some of tat work, and come up with a “Poor man’s” version to spy and violate the constitutional rights of innocent citizens.

 

An experimental police surveillance program funded by Texas philanthropists John and Laura Arnold worries observers of private influence in the public sphere

Thousands of runners will sweat their way past the scenic highlights of central Baltimore in the city’s marathon on Saturday, but the action will not only be at ground level. An aircraft equipped with advanced cameras is set to circle high above their heads, as part of a secretive surveillance programme funded by Texan billionaires.

Last year, Radiolab, a public radio show, featured a company called Persistent Surveillance Systems, which specialises in wide-area eye-in-the-sky technology. It flies a small plane for hours above urban areas, taking thousands of photographs that are sent to analysts who then track movements at street level.

After the radio segment aired, the philanthropist John Arnold got in touch with the owner of Persistent, Ross McNutt. Arnold and his wife, Laura, were intrigued by the technology’s crime-fighting potential and agreed to fund a trial somewhere. With $360,000 from the Arnolds, McNutt struck a deal with Baltimore.

From January to August this year, Baltimore police said at a news conference last week, the plane flew over the city for 314 hours, taking more than a million images. The police added that the plane would operate as an anti-terrorism measure during Fleet Week, which started on Monday, and the marathon.

This spurt of transparency was more than a little tardy. Until Bloomberg Businessweek ran a story in August, virtually no one knew about the surveillance programme, not even the mayor. Yet the technology raises obvious civil liberties questions, as does the way the plan was funded: by unaccountable private citizens in Houston whose wealth silently enabled a blanket tracking tool in a large city with notoriously strained relations between police and residents.

“[John Arnold] called me, and he just heard it on the Radiolab piece and asked what he could do to help, and he thought we could run a test with the system and I said we would love to and we appreciate his help,” said McNutt. “They’re fantastic people, they really are, and they’re doing great things and trying to help out as much as they can.”

The Arnolds are not universally loved. Two years ago, a Bloomberg profile of John Arnold was headlined: Giving Back Has Made This 41-year-old Retired Billionaire Less Popular.

The Dallas-born Arnold was a millionaire Enron trader who became a billionaire hedge fund manager. He quit at 38, having amassed a reported $4bn fortune, and started the Laura and John Arnold Foundation with his wife, a former attorney. They have committed to giving the bulk of their wealth to philanthropic causes and have an appetite for forensic examination of complex and often divisive issues.

According to the Foundation, it has awarded more than $617m in grant money since 2011, in line with its aim of seeking “transformational change” through “strategic investments in criminal justice, education, evidence-based policy and innovation, public accountability, and research integrity”….

A sceptic might argue that society cannot understand something it does not know about. David Rocah, senior staff attorney at the ACLU of Maryland, said his organisation was concerned by the nature of the surveillance and the opaque way it was adopted.

“What the secret funding from the Arnolds meant,” he said, “is that it didn’t even have to be disclosed to the city’s purchasing folks and the mayor didn’t know, the city council didn’t know … nobody knew.

“The fact is that surveillance technologies are acquired by police departments all over the country all the time with zero public input, even where the Arnolds aren’t secretly funding it. This case is just an extraordinary, an extreme, example of a larger problem.”

Most of the money was passed to Baltimore through the Police Foundation, a not-for-profit research body in Washington that previously worked with the Arnold Foundation on a study of eyewitness identification procedure. As soon as next week, the Police Foundation intends to release a report that will examine the potential value of McNutt’s surveillance technology.

 

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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BLM Activist Convicted For “Lynching”

Going back to the days of the Civil Rights Movement when Police spied on, persecuted, and murdered black leaders…

Black Lives Matter Activist Sentenced to 90 Days in Jail for ‘Lynching’

For the first time in American history, a Black woman has been convicted of “lynching.”

Last week, a California judge sentenced Jasmine Richards, a 28-year-old Black Lives Matter activist to 90 days in jail for lynching, defined in California as “the taking by means of a riot of another person from the lawful custody of a police officer”, reports Vox.

The conviction stems from an incident that took place last August, in which police were called because a Black woman had been accused of exiting a restaurant without paying.

As police attempted to arrest the woman, Richards, who was nearby at a Black Lives Matter protest, approached the officers. Video shows Richards standing by the woman, but police claim she was trying to pull her away.

Richards was arrested and charged with delaying and obstructing peace officers, inciting a riot, child endangerment and lynching.

Though other African-Americans in the state have been charged with lynching, Richards is the first to be convicted. Lawyers for Richards say that this is an attempt at silencing the activist.

“Clearly this is a political prosecution,” her attorney, Nana Gyamfi said to Vox. “Its intention is to stop people from organizing and from speaking out and challenging the system. There’s a political message that’s been sent by both the prosecutor and the police and, by conviction, the jury.”

 
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Posted by on June 9, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Taxation Through Citation

Larry Lessig, here being interviewed by Cenk Uygur lays out the corrupt system of Civil fines… And while Ferguson may be the most exposed example, as we have seen in Biloxi and other areas, this isn’t just an isolated systemic-abuse problem.

 
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Posted by on October 25, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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