Tag Archives: owner

Racial Attack Against Restaurant Owner In Tiny Town

Lot of the KKK, Militia, and Aryan Nation types resettled along the Va-WVa border in the Shenandoah and Monongahela Mountains, giving Va one of the larger numbers in terms of Hate Groups as identified by the SPLC. Folks have been getting along for a long time in those hills…Unfortunately the inbred hater type seems to be causing issues. The Extreme Court has made is substantially more difficult to prosecute Civil Rights violations, protecting the SCUMUS 5 base. As the owner of the Pretty Penny Cafe in Hillsboro just found out.

This is a “must stop” place on the way to the Ski Resorts, and to her credit, owner Blair Campbell has drawn a lot of business into an otherwise dead little town.

“The N-word is a horrible word, but how is it a threat?”: The search for justice after a terrifying racial violation

The man who defaced the Pretty Penny Cafe was arrested, but proving civil rights violations was more elusive

On Jan. 8, the words “nigger lover” were spray-painted in dark green onto the north-facing exterior wall of the Pretty Penny Cafe, the only restaurant in Hillsboro, West Virginia, a town of about 300 that sits near the state’s southeastern border with Virginia. The cafe, which was once the general store, is owned by Blair Campbell, a white woman raised in the area who lives down the road with her husband, originally from Jamaica, and their two children; the cafe also employs a black chef raised in Greenbrier County, just to the south. Pocahontas County, which contains Hillsboro, is 96 percent white, 1 percent black and 3 percent Latino or mixed race.

In an article that ran on Martin Luther King Day, I reported here that Hillsboro showed strong support for Campbell’s family in the aftermath of the crime and that Hillsboro might be looked to as an example of how small rural towns can grapple with racism and their histories of exclusion. A group of Campbell’s friends came out in six degree weather and helped her scrub the words off with brake fluid. In the days following, Campbell and supporters started a unity campaign called “We Are One,” which has to date just shy of 1,500 likes, and organized a “Love Fest” potluck held at the Presbyterian Church, which was attended by more than 200 people. Campbell is well known in town as the owner of this prominent business; when the Derecho wind storm of 2012 left the community without power or water for a week, her cafe became the center of relief efforts and cooked up nearly 3,500 meals.

Justice initially seemed swift: “The cops did a great job,” Campbell says. Halfway through the “love fest” potluck, an officer with the Pocahontas County Sheriff’s Department arrived saying he was on his way to interview a suspect. Robbie Ratliff, 40, of Greenbrier County, who has a record for other misdemeanor crimes, was arrested and soon confessed. His tape-recorded confession, later played in court, says he was acting solely out of a personal grudge against Campbell — that he simply wanted to hurt her feelings because of what he felt was a monetary debt owed to his girlfriend, a former employee of Campbell’s cafe, and that he is not a racist. Neither Ratliff nor his lawyer returned requests for comment.

Ratliff was charged with destruction of property — a misdemeanor carrying a maximum penalty of $500 fine or up to one year in jail — and violating Campbell’s civil rights, a felony. West Virginia state code Section 61-6-21 states, “All persons within the boundaries of the state of West Virginia have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against their persons or property because of their race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, political affiliation or sex … If any person does by force or threat of force, willfully injure, intimidate or interfere with, or attempt to injure, intimidate or interfere with, or oppress or threaten any other person in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him or her by the Constitution or laws of the state of West Virginia or by the Constitution or laws of the United States, because of such other person’s race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, political affiliation or sex, he or she shall be guilty of a felony, and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both.”

But enforcing this statute is another matter. Ratliff’s trial on Aug. 28 was inadequate and disappointing to Campbell, her husband, Charlan, and their supporters. It took less than five hours and Pocahontas County Prosecutor Eugene Simmons only questioned Campbell about how she felt when she saw the racist graffiti: “Scared. Sad.”

“I had no voice,” Campbell says. In addition to two witnesses who testified that they saw Ratliff’s truck in the area of Campbell’s business the night of the crime, the only other witness called by the prosecution was Pocahontas County Sheriff’s Department Capt. McCoy who introduced the tape of Ratliff’s confession. According to local attorney Clint Carte who was observing the proce

Pretty Penny owner, Blair Campbell

edings, “They had him nailed dead to right on the destruction of property. But when he discussed his own internal motivations he was careful to say, hey, this wasn’t a racial thing. I came away thinking, gosh, this confession may actually help him.”

After deliberating for 20 minutes, an all-white jury found Ratliff guilty of destruction of property but not of the civil rights violation. To Campbell, the jury’s verdict was insulting and devaluing. “There was nobody there to testify to how fundamentally terrifying that word is for people of color,” Campbell says. “That was really frustrating.”

Robert Leslie, senior deputy for the West Virginia attorney general, says that the statute was a difficult one that is not widely used. “It must be proved beyond a reasonable doubt. That is a very hard conviction to get.”

Why? According to ACLU executive director Jennifer Meinig, a conviction on a civil rights violation charge rests on proving that the perpetrator was motivated by discriminatory intent. “Prosecutors have to prove some sort of motive based on a protected class,” says Meinig. “Proving someone’s motive or state of mind is always difficult to do.”

Prosecutor Eugene Simmons ran for the office as an Independent and has supported some progressive policies in the county such as gun control. Simmons, who did not return requests for comment, argued that Ratliff used force to put the words on Campbell’s wall, but did not present witnesses testifying that Ratliff’s words were intended to intimidate Campbell or that Ratliff had a pattern of racist behavior.

“It’s pretty obvious that’s racist,” Campbell says. “I don’t know how you can get any more threatening or intimidating than that word on my business.”

Unfortunately, the law does not agree. “The N-word is a horrible word we don’t use,” says Phil Morrison, executive director of the West Virginia Prosecuting Attorney’s Institute, “but how is it a threat?

“They have to prove a threat under this statute. The N-word is not a threat in and of itself. It has to be combined with other words to create a clear threat, as in, N-lover, I’m gonna kill you.”…

The place also has live bands, with Bluegrass, Country, and Blues. Here is the Daddy Mack Blues Band playing…

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Posted by on November 8, 2015 in The Definition of Racism


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Stupid Deal of the Decade? Magic Johnson Group Buys LA Dodgers for $2 billion…

There are good investments…and bad.  Paying out $2 billion for a Sports Franchise in a sport which is on the way down – is definitely one of those “bad” investment ideas. Seems to me $2 b could be better spent buying a NFL Franchise (Several of which are actually worth $2 B or more) or investing in Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), which is about the fastest growing professional sport out there right now. The list of the Top 50 Professional Sports Franchises in the World looks like this.

So… Why but the Dodgers?

I hope Magic hasn’t lost his business “magic”!

Group Led by Magic Johnson Wins Auction to Buy Dodgers for $2.15 Billion

In a quick, dramatic end to the year-long financial crisis of the Los Angeles Dodgers, the team’s owner, Frank McCourt, agreed to sell the team Tuesday night for $2.15 billion to a group headed by Magic Johnson, the Lakers’ Hall of Famer.

The Johnson group’s deal, financed largely by Guggenheim Partners, a Chicago-based financial services firm, includes $2 billion for the team (minus $412 million in debt) and $150 million to create a joint venture with McCourt on the parking lots and land surrounding Dodger Stadium. The deal is valued at $2.3 billion.

If the all-cash deal is approved by the judge overseeing the Dodgers’ bankruptcy, the price will be the most ever paid for a professional sports team.

The most ever paid for a franchise is at least $1.4 billion for Manchester United. The Miami Dolphins were sold for $1.15 billion and the Chicago Cubs were acquired for $845 million. McCourt, who bought the team in 2004 for $421 million, had resisted selling the real estate, preferring to rent the lots for $14 million a year to the team’s new owner. But the Johnson group suggested the joint venture on the land, said a person briefed on the sale but not authorized to speak publicly.

The deal will let McCourt repay a $150 million loan made to the team last year by Major League Baseball and his $130 million divorce settlement to his ex-wife, Jamie.

The winning bid defeated one by Stan Kroenke, the billionaire owner of the St. Louis Rams, Colorado Avalanche and Denver Nuggets, and a second from two other billionaires: Steven A. Cohen, the hedge-fund manager who recently bought a small share of the Mets, and Patrick Soon-Shiong, who made his money in pharmaceuticals.

The final steps in the process came rapidly. McCourt’s investment banker, Blackstone, asked each bidder to raise their offers Monday night.

Baseball owners approved all three bidders Tuesday afternoon and later in the evening McCourt selected on the Johnson group. An announcement was made shortly after 11 p.m. eastern.

In addition to Johnson and Guggenheim Partners, the winning group includes Stan Kasten, the former president of the Atlanta Braves and Washington Nationals, and Peter Guber, the film producer and head of Mandalay Entertainment.

The agreement to sell the Dodgers to Johnson’s group appears to end an extraordinary year for the team. It filed for bankruptcy last June after Selig blocked a new, long-term billion-dollar cable TV deal between the Dodgers and Fox Sports. Selig had sharply criticized McCourt’s management of the team — in particular his use of team money for his and his ex-wife’s personal use — and installed a monitor to oversee the team’s operations. McCourt called that a hostile takeover.


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Bad Doggie! Baaaaaad Doggie!

Good reason to own a cat!

Dog Runs Over Owner With Truck

Lesson learned the hard way: Never trust canine drivers.

Tassey's Mug Shot

A Florida man was taken to the hospital yesterday after his dog ran him over with the man’s own pickup truck. Christopher Bishop, 43, made the mistake of putting his Ford F-150 in neutral as he got out to check for oil leaks, the St. Petersburg Times reports. As he checked under the front, his bulldog Tassey leapt into the front seat and knocked the truck into gear.

The truck rolled over the left side of Bishop’s body. He managed to get up and get into the truck to stop it. After several hours of intense pain, he called an ambulance and was taken from his home to a nearby hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. He said he’d waited so long because he doesn’t like doctors.

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Posted by on June 24, 2010 in Nawwwwww!


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