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Black Feminists and the Primary

Any automatic supposition about support of Hillary Clinton by black feminists…

Would be wrong.

Black Feminism heavily influenced the Black Panther movement, and by the end, the majority of membership in the Panthers were black women. Some historians credit women in the Panthers as being the creators of the hugely successful breakfast and lunch programs for children.

Democratic Primary Finds Black Feminists Conflicted

Ask a black feminist whether she prefers Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, and you very well might hear “Neither.”

“I long for Shirley Chisholm to be running, to be really honest,” said Renee Bracey Sherman, a reproductive justice activist in Washington, D.C.

Alas for Bracey Sherman, the congresswoman who in 1972 was the first major-party black candidateto run for president, and who promised a “bloodless revolution,” isn’t running. (Chisholm died over a decade ago.) But two candidates who vow to make history in their own ways are, and Bracey Sherman, like many black feminists MSNBC interviewed, is ambivalent.

“I’m definitely weighing my options,” she said. “A lot of my beliefs on economic policies fall in line with Bernie Sanders. However, he is not able to connect the way that gender and race intersect with economic inequality the way Hillary does.”

For weeks, Sanders and Clinton and their allies have tussled over who is the genuine progressive, whose policies are more feminist and who can make the most meaningful difference in black Americans’ lives. So far, as the primary has shifted from majority white states to more diverse ones, the feminist mantle and the black vote have been talked about as if they are separate silos.

“An emphasis on not only black women, but black feminists, is long overdue,” said Lori Adelman, co-executive director of Feministing. “So often, black women’s support is taken for granted.”

The candidates are both concertedly seeking the votes of black women, long a crucial base of the Democratic Party. Both have hired prominent black women, including feminist activists, to represent their campaigns, though Clinton’s inner circle has long been more diverse. Over the weekend, entrance polls showed Clinton winning black voters in Nevada, and polls of South Carolina, which votes Saturday, show Clinton enjoys a broad advantage among African-American voters there too. But in interviews, black feminists with influential perches in activism, journalism and academia critiqued both Democrats.

“I’m glad for any feminist who feels confident that their needs will be met by Hillary or Bernie’s presidency,” Shanelle Matthews, lead communications strategist for Black Lives Matter, wrote in an email. “As a black feminist, I’m not there yet. And frankly, I’d like to stop being lectured by white feminists who would boorishly call themselves my ally while also paternalistically scolding me for not bending toward their political ideologies.”

Black feminist critics of Clinton cite in particular past support of her husband’s policies on criminal justice and welfare reform, which exacted a disproportionate toll on African-Americans. They recoil at how in 1996, Clinton referred to “super predators” who needed to be brought “to heel,” which many saw as dehumanizing language that targeted black children in particular. “If Hillary wants to court black women, she should start by apologizing for all the ways she has hurt our families and us,” said Matthews.

University of Pennsylvania professor Salamishah Tillet, who described herself as undecided but leaning Sanders, said, “It’s hard for me to champion a Clinton prosperity narrative as proof of electability of another candidate when I feel like it decimated the black community and criminalized black men.”

Still, Tillet said, she thinks Clinton has been far more adept than Sanders in using an approach pioneered by black feminists. “I’m increasingly becoming impressed with how Clinton is invoking an intersectional framework,” she said, referring to the term coined by law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw to invoke how overlapping identities shape marginalization.

Clinton even came out and used the word in her speech in Harlem last week, quite possibly a first. “We face a complex set of economic, social and political challenges,” Clinton said. “They are intersectional, they are reinforcing and we’ve got to take them all on.”

And the candidate’s recent refrain that she is not a single-issue candidate, implicitly an attack on Sanders’ relentless focus on economics, seems to evoke a much quoted line from the black lesbian poet Audre Lorde: “There is no thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.”…Read The Rest Here

 

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2016 in Black History, Democrat Primary

 

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RNC to Asians & Hispanics – All Y’all Look Alike to Us!

Small problem with Republican outreach Web Page to Hispanics…

The pictures are actually of Asian kids.

rnc latinos

RNC Latinos Site Removes Picture Of Asian Children

The Republican National Committee corrected an embarrassing mistake on Thursday after the children in a picture used on its RNC Latinos website turned out to not actually be Latino.

blog post on U.S. News & World Report quickly spread after the reporter found thestock photo used in the site’s header had been tagged with “asia,” “asian,” “japanese” and “thailand” — but nothing to indicate that the children were Latino.

“An outside vendor developed the site and it is being corrected immediately,” RNC Spokesperson Alexandra Franceschi told HuffPost in an email.

The site, which is in Spanish, is part of an effort by the Republican National Committee to increase outreach to Latinos, a voter bloc the GOP normally loses to Democrats.

As of 4:30 p.m. EST, the photo had been taken off the page.

It’s not the first time Republicans have misidentified Latinos: HuffPost discovered in April that the National Republican Congressional Committee’s list of supposedly Hispanic candidates included two white women who were married to Latinos.

Former senate hopeful Sharron Angle, a Republican, made a more damning comment about Latinos and Asians during her 2010 race against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), telling a Hispanic group, “some of you look a little Asian to me.”

 
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Posted by on June 15, 2012 in Stupid Republican Tricks

 

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Tea Party to Recruit Minorities

Now, I don’t know any hard working black folks who would invite, or allow their kids to invite some gang-banging drug thug into their home. Yeah, I know that in some places the line gets pretty blurred – but black dads, where there is one – and in some cases black moms and grand moms have a reputation of getting out of hand when little Sushilakawanna or Tireironrone come home with thug friends.

Here’s a hint. It’s not just the bigoted, or ignorant white folks that keep black folks away from the Tea Party.

Think you might start attracting a better class of black folks, exactly at the moment you start putting that blame thing a little closer (in your specific case – a lot closer)  to home, Mr. Armey.

Tea Party Group Wants Jews, African Americans And Hispanics

FreedomWorks, the big daddy of the tea party-sponsoring organizations, is the latest to make an attempt at shedding the movement’s all-white image. The group recently announced DiverseTea, a targeted advertising and outreach campaign aimed at extending the tea party’s reach into minority communities. After a summer of attacks on the tea party (most notably from the NAACP, which accused the tea party movement of harboring racist elements — a criticism tea partiers reject out of hand), FreedomWorks is the latest to get on the diversity train.

“We do need to reach out,” FreedomWorks president Matt Kibbe told me at a meeting sponsored by the Christian Science MonitorMonday. Kibbe said the new initiative will “build a platform” for tea party leaders from across the spectrum, including “African Americans, Jews, Hispanics,” and others. Kibbe said that though it’s important the group reach out, the talk of diversifying the tea party is more about changing the perception of the movement rather than the reality.

“There is this nagging perception that we are not diverse, and I disagree with that,” he said. Kibbe told me after the meeting that the plethora of diverse voices on stage at rallies like Sunday’s 9/12 meeting in Washington (where a virtually all-white crowd was regaled by numerous African American and Latino speakers) was part of a concerted effort to show minorities that they’re welcome at tea party events.

FreedomWorks chair Dick Armey — the former congressman and bombastic public face of the organization — was a bit more grumpy when it came to discussing the racial makeup of tea party crowds.

“I really get a little tired of diversity talk from liberals,” he said. Armey blames “liberal theology” for keeping diverse crowds away.

Armey said that members “of what the establishment calls the minority identification” face criticism from their friends and relatives if they attend tea party events — or even come out as a conservative at all. The fear of that reprisal is what keeps them away from the tea party rallies, he says.

“The difficulties, the harassment, the intolerance the abuse that they suffer comes from — for example, if you’re a black American at our rally, your own community, your own relatives, your own family,” Armey said. “So it is extremely difficult for black Americans to say, ‘I am a conservative’ because they get beset in the most vicious ways.”

This is a line shouted often by tea party leaders when asked about the often stunningly low turnout of anyone other than white people at their rallies. It’s liberals that scare the minorities from stepping out of line and joining the tea party, leaders say, not anything the tea party is doing.

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2010 in Black Conservatives, Stupid Tea Bagger Tricks

 

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