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Spurred on By Republican Hate Speech – Muslims Become the New N-Word In America

About 20 years ago, I was doing a project down in Mississippi. My coworker from the client side was a black man, call him Joe (imagine the kind of slow talking, quiet guy that when he says something, it is well worth listening to), and an Iranian who had come to the country after the Shah had fallen. Our Persian co-worker was amazed at the “friendliness” of the white southerners we met, The fact that they spoke, and almost always said hello, please, and Thank You. Joe explained that in the south, manners were a standard by which many people judged themselves and those they met. Didn’t mean they liked you, or wanted to invite you home to join the family. At which out rather dark skinned Persian co-worker declared that Persians were “white”. Joe laughed, and explained…”Down here we got black folks, and we go white folks, and “other”. And ‘other’ in your case is what the rednecks down here call ‘A-Rab’, which means if the isht hits the fan down here…Ain’t nobody coming to help you.”

Since that time, several hundred thousand Muslims have moved to America from other parts of the Middle East, including Iraq. Like any immigrant group to America, they are first met with insensitivity born of ignorance, and then hate, usually followed by grudging respect when the rest of America readjusts their “head” about such group. Doesn’t mean the ethno-racism, or color racism goes away…

Except when Politicians or Political parties make that racism “Acceptable”…

The next thing Muslim immigrants are going to have to realize, is the bigots go after the weak and defenseless, not someone who can fight back. As such, they are going to have to learn the lessons that black folks (and immigrants) learned a long time ago, yet again in protecting women and children.

Muslim student nearly run over by man who called her a terrorist: ‘I’m terrified to cross the street now’

A Muslim pre-med student said she was nearly run over and killed by a man who called her a terrorist.

Haneen Jasim said she was wearing her hijab as she walked home Saturday night from studying at a Starbucks near the University of Cincinnati, reported WLWT-TV.

The 22-year-old student said the driver started honking his horn, cursing and calling her a terrorist as she crossed the street — and then he drove straight toward her and didn’t stop.

Three people walking in front of Jasim grabbed her and pulled her onto the sidewalk just before the car struck her.

“Within an instant he tried to run over me,” Jasim said. “If it wasn’t for the three people in front of me, grabbing me onto the sidewalk, I would have been dead right there.”

Jasim said the man drove away before she could read his license plate number, and she wasn’t sure police could help her without that information.

So she instead called the Council on American Islamic Relations, whose officials said this was the third such incident of anti-Muslim harassment reported in Cincinnati since the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in Paris.

“It’s very disappointing, as well that people in our community would stoop so low,” said Karen Dabdoub, executive director of the local CAIR chapter. “Obviously, the people here had nothing to do with the Paris attack or any terrorist attacks or terrorist ideology for that matter.”

 

Dabdoub said a Muslim woman was assaulted in a Kroger parking lot in the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood, and another Musli woman was insulted and spat on by someone in a passing car.

 
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Posted by on November 23, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Colin Powell on Trolling Republicans

Powell went to work for George W. Bush due to loyalty to his father. That was catastrophic, not only for Powell’s reputation, but the entire country because of Dick Cheney.

Powell is not done sticking the fork in those scumbags yet…

Colin Powell admits he’s trolling the GOP: “I continue to be a Republican because it annoys them”

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell said at the Washington Ideas Forum Wednesday that he only remains a Republican “because it annoys them,” the Hill’s Mark Hensch reports.

“I continue to be a Republican because it annoys them,” Powell told host Walter Isaacson. “I think the party has shifted much further right than where the country is, and it should be obvious to party leaders that they cannot keep saying and doing the things that they were doing and hope to be successful in national-level election in the future — not just in 2016.”

Powell also claimed that the current crop of GOP candidates is mistaken in believing that the majority of the country — Republicans included — doesn’t want the next president to act on immigration reform. “I think most Republicans understand that we need immigration, we are an immigrant nation [and that] it is in our best interest to do it,” he said.

However, he added, “there are pockets of intolerance within the Republican Party [and] the Republican Party had better figure out how to defeat that.”

Powell disagreed in particular with Donald Trump, saying that “if I was around Mr. Trump — Donald, who I know rather well — I would say, ‘You know, Don, let’s see what happens — let’s tell all the immigrants working in Trump hotels to stay home tomorrow. Let’s see what happens.’”

 
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Posted by on October 1, 2015 in Giant Negros

 

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That Muslim US President Thing

Once again – Ben Carson’s statement that a Muslim cannot be President of the United States has no Constitutional basis. Indeed, there is no religious requirement in the Constitution.

There are two serving Muslims in Congress, Reps. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and Andre Carson (D-Ind.).

Their thoughts on Uncle Ben’s latest outrage…

Muslim Congressmen Condemn Ben Carson Over Anti-Muslim Comments

Rep. Andre Carson (D-Ind.)

Reps. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and Andre Carson (D-Ind.), the two Muslim members of Congress, on Sunday condemned GOP presidential candidates Ben Carson and Donald Trump for making offensive comments about Islam.

Carson told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he would not support a Muslim becoming president because Islam is “inconsistent with the values and principles of America” and is incompatible with the U.S. Constitution. At a town hall event on Thursday, Trump declined to correct a man who claimed President Barack Obama is Muslim.

“For Ben Carson, Donald Trump, or any other Republican politician to suggest that someone of any faith is unfit for office is out of touch with who we are as a people,” Ellison, the first Muslim elected to Congress, said in a statement. “It’s unimaginable that the leading GOP presidential candidates are resorting to fear mongering to benefit their campaigns, and every American should be disturbed that these national figures are engaging in and tolerating blatant acts of religious bigotry.

Rep. Andre Carson (D-Ind.) called the famed neurosurgeon’s comments “simply ridiculous.”

Rep Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

“Saying that the U.S. shouldn’t elect a Muslim U.S. president is absurd as saying we shouldn’t elect a neurosurgeon as president,” he said in a radio interview with Roland Martin.

“The comments made by Dr. Carson show, I think, he isn’t ready to be commander-in-chief of this country,” he added.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, which calls itself the largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S., will on Monday call for Carson to withdraw from the race.

Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Carson’s rivals for the Republican presidential nomination, also rebuked the neurosurgeon over his anti-Muslim comments.

And if it is any consolation, at least two Republican candidates, Ted Cruz, and Lindsay Graham “get it”

“You know, the Constitution specifies there shall be no religious test for public office and I am a constitutionalist,” Cruz said on Iowa public television. He also again declined to weigh in on President Barack Obama’s faith, saying it was a matter between him and God.

Earlier Sunday, Graham reacted to Carson’s remarks on Twitter by claiming the doctor “is not ready to be Commander-In-Chief. America is an idea, not owned by a particular religion.”

The presidential hopeful further called on Carson to apologize to American Muslims, arguing that although Carson was a “good doctor,” he was “clearly not prepared to lead a great nation.”

 
 

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Kid Arrested for Building a Clock

 

Most of us in the electronics business would recognize the above as a “project board”. You can buy these at the few still existing Radio Shacks or online and add electronic components to them to make a radio, a clock, or most anything you want confined to the capability of he device type…Including a Bomb timer.

What makes this a school project instead of a bomb, is the absence of something which goes “boom” like C4 or Semtex, which is pretty hard to come by by domestic or international terrorists inside the US…and virtually impossible to obtain as a High School kid. Which is a big part of the reason Timothy McVeigh used a fertilizer-oil (AMFO) bomb to blow up the Murrah Center, and the 9/11 terrorists…Used airplanes. The second reason this is a school project, is some of the little pieces on that green board are traceable to whomever purchased them.

Why someone should confuse the two things – a bomb and a kids electronic project, is an issue involving stereotypes and racism. Obviously this High School doesn’t offer any advanced college prep classes in Chemistry.

Muslim teen arrested after Texas teachers believe homemade clock is a bomb

A Dallas-area teen with a knack for tinkering built a homemade clock for his engineering teachers. Ahmed Mohamed never expected the reaction he’d receive for his invention. The 14-year-old Irving ISD student was arrested.

Despite repeated explanations that the device is a clock and no proof of explosives, police could charge Mohamed “with making a hoax bomb,” the Dallas Morning News reported.

The event has caught the attention of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and  ignited outrage on social media. A hashtag #IStandWithAhmed has began trending early Wednesday morning.

“I think this wouldn’t even be a question if his name wasn’t Ahmed Mohamed,” said Alia Salem, executive director of CAIR’s North Texas chapter, according to ABC affiliate WFAA. “He is an excited kid who is very bright and wants to share it with his teachers.”

A photo circulating on Twitter — of a slight student in a NASA T-shirt in handcuffs — appears to show the end of the incident that occurred Monday. The Dallas Morning News described Mohamed as a skilled engineer who can build “his own radios and repair his own go-kart.”

The freshman at MacArthur High School received a three day suspension. Police are investigating the case even though they acknowledge that the student had not made any references to a bomb. From the Morning News:

“We have no information that he claimed it was a bomb,” [Police spokesman James] McLellan said. “He kept maintaining it was a clock, but there was no broader explanation.”

Well, Ahmed, I have some sympathy for you borne out of personal experience. I built some rather powerful rockets back in my day, scrounging parts from junkyards and Edmund Scientific on my small allowance budget. Capable of launching well over 10,000 ft. Got arrested for trying to shoot down an airplane by a local rooter-tooter cop, because I launched my rocket 20 miles from an airport. Local reporter came to my defense and threatened a critical article…

Hope the Internet world hearing about your case has a positive result!

 

 

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Thomas Jefferson and the Defense of Muslim Citizens

Thomas Jefferson would be the first in the history of American politics to suffer the false charge of being a Muslim. Slavery hid the fact that some of the slaves imported to America were Muslim. This is an interesting treatise on how early Americans views Islam, and how things today are more similar that we would believe.

 

Our Founding Fathers included Islam

At a time when most Americans were uninformed, misinformed, or simply afraid of Islam, Thomas Jefferson imagined Muslims as future citizens of his new nation. His engagement with the faith began with the purchase of a Qur’an eleven years before he wrote the Declaration of Independence. Jefferson’s Qur’an survives still in the Library of Congress, serving as a symbol of his and early America’s complex relationship with Islam and its adherents. That relationship remains of signal importance to this day.

That he owned a Qur’an reveals Jefferson’s interest in the Islamic religion, but it does not explain his support for the rights of Muslims. Jefferson first read about Muslim “civil rights” in the work of one of his intellectual heroes: the seventeenth-century English philosopher John Locke. Locke had advocated the toleration of Muslims—and Jews—following in the footsteps of a few others in Europe who had considered the matter for more than a century before him. Jefferson’s ideas about Muslim rights must be understood within this older context, a complex set of transatlantic ideas that would continue to evolve most markedly from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries.

Amid the interdenominational Christian violence in Europe, some Christians, beginning in the sixteenth century, chose Muslims as the test case for the demarcation of the theoretical boundaries of their toleration for all believers. Because of these European precedents, Muslims also became a part of American debates about religion and the limits of citizenship. As they set about creating a new government in the United States, the American Founders, Protestants all, frequently referred to the adherents of Islam as they contemplated the proper scope of religious freedom and individual rights among the nation’s present and potential inhabitants. The founding generation debated whether the United States should be exclusively Protestant or a religiously plural polity. And if the latter, whether political equality—the full rights of citizenship, including access to the highest office—should extend to non-Protestants. The mention, then, of Muslims as potential citizens of the United States forced the Protestant majority to imagine the parameters of their new society beyond toleration. It obliged them to interrogate the nature of religious freedom: the issue of a “religious test” in the Constitution, like the ones that would exist at the state level into the nineteenth century; the question of “an establishment of religion,” potentially of Protestant Christianity; and the meaning and extent of a separation of religion from government.

Resistance to the idea of Muslim citizenship was predictable in the eighteenth century. Americans had inherited from Europe almost a millennium of negative distortions of the faith’s theological and political character. Given the dominance and popularity of these anti-Islamic representations, it was startling that a few notable Americans not only refused to exclude Muslims, but even imagined a day when they would be citizens of the United States, with full and equal rights. This surprising, uniquely American egalitarian defense of Muslim rights was the logical extension of European precedents already mentioned. Still, on both sides of the Atlantic, such ideas were marginal at best. How, then, did the idea of the Muslim as a citizen with rights survive despite powerful opposition from the outset? And what is the fate of that ideal in the twenty-first century?

This book provides a new history of the founding era, one that explains how and why Thomas Jefferson and a handful of others adopted and then moved beyond European ideas about the toleration of Muslims. It should be said at the outset that these exceptional men were not motivated by any inherent appreciation for Islam as a religion. Muslims, for most American Protestants, remained beyond the outer limit of those possessing acceptable beliefs, but they nevertheless became emblems of two competing conceptions of the nation’s identity: one essentially preserving the Protestant status quo, and the other fully realizing the pluralism implied in the Revolutionary rhetoric of inalienable and universal rights. Thus while some fought to exclude a group whose inclusion they feared would ultimately portend the undoing of the nation’s Protestant character, a pivotal minority, also Protestant, perceiving the ultimate benefit and justice of a religiously plural America, set about defending the rights of future Muslim citizens.

They did so, however, not for the sake of actual Muslims, because none were known at the time to live in America. Instead, Jefferson and others defended Muslim rights for the sake of “imagined Muslims,” the promotion of whose theoretical citizenship would prove the true universality of American rights. Indeed, this defense of imagined Muslims would also create political room to consider the rights of other despised minorities whose numbers in America, though small, were quite real, namely Jews and Catholics. Although it was Muslims who embodied the ideal of inclusion, Jews and Catholics were often linked to them in early American debates, as Jefferson and others fought for the rights of all non-Protestants.

In 1783, the year of the nation’s official independence from Great Britain, George Washington wrote to recent Irish Catholic immigrants in New York City. The American Catholic minority of roughly twenty-five thousand then had few legal protections in any state and, because of their faith, no right to hold political office in New York. Washington insisted that “the bosom of America” was “open to receive . . . the oppressed and the persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges.” He would also write similar missives to Jewish communities, whose total population numbered only about two thousand at this time.

One year later, in 1784, Washington theoretically enfolded Muslims into his private world at Mount Vernon. In a letter to a friend seeking a carpenter and bricklayer to help at his Virginia home, he explained that the workers’ beliefs—or lack thereof—mattered not at all: “If they are good workmen, they may be of Asia, Africa, or Europe. They may be Mahometans [Muslims], Jews or Christian of an[y] Sect, or they may be Atheists.” Clearly, Muslims were part of Washington’s understanding of religious pluralism—at least in theory. But he would not have actually expected any Muslim applicants.

Although we have since learned that there were in fact Muslims resident in eighteenth-century America, this book demonstrates that the Founders and their generational peers never knew it. Thus their Muslim constituency remained an imagined, future one. But the fact that both Washington and Jefferson attached to it such symbolic significance is not accidental. Both men were heir to the same pair of opposing European traditions.

The first, which predominated, depicted Islam as the antithesis of the “true faith” of Protestant Christianity, as well as the source of tyrannical governments abroad. To tolerate Muslims—to accept them as part of a majority Protestant Christian society—was to welcome people who professed a faith most eighteenth-century Europeans and Americans believed false, foreign, and threatening. Catholics would be similarly characterized in American Protestant founding discourse. Indeed, their faith, like Islam, would be deemed a source of tyranny and thus antithetical to American ideas of liberty….(More)

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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Kenya Sends Troops into Somalia to Hunt Down Al Shabaab Terrorists

Tourism is a major contributor to the economy of Kenya, contributing about 60% to the GDP. So when you start kidnapping, abductingforeign aid workers,  and murdering tourists in Kenya – killing their tourist business

The normally pacifist Kenya has to do something.

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 20, 2011 in Africa

 

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Cain Apologizes to Muslims

Not being surrounded by a bunch of white Tea Baggers out west – Herman tries to do the buckdance to moonwalk back on his vitriol…

Cain apologizes after meeting with Muslim leaders

 Republican Herman Cain is apologizing to Muslim leaders for vitriolic remarks he made about Islam while campaigning for the presidential nomination.

The former Godfather’s Pizza CEO has said communities have a right to ban Islamic mosques because Muslims are trying to inject sharia law into the U.S. He’s also said he would not want a Muslim bent on killing Americans in his administration.

On Wednesday, Cain met with four Muslim leaders in Sterling, Va. He said in a statement later he was “truly sorry” for comments that may have “betrayed” his commitment to the Constitution and the religious freedom it guarantees.

He also acknowledged that Muslims, “like all Americans,” have the right to practice freely their faith and that most Muslim Americans are peaceful and patriotic.

 

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