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Texas…Again. This Time Murder by Gun-Gonzo

Why we don’t want guns on the street…

The accused murderer, Michelle Chase

Texas woman fatally shoots deaf man who knocked on her door — and leaves note on his body saying ‘sorry’

A Texas woman shot and killed a deaf man who apparently frightened her by knocking at the door — and she left an index card next to his body with the word “sorry” written on it.

Michelle Chase called police about 10 a.m. Sunday to report the shooting, and officers found the man’s body — along with the cryptic note — outside her apartment door.

The 49-year-old Chase initially denied killing 50-year-old William Farr, who police said showed no obvious signs of trauma or foul play.

An autopsy on Monday revealed Farr had been shot in the chest with a small-caliber bullet.

Chase admitted to police that she shot Farr, who was deaf and communicated with a computer tablet, on Saturday night because he scared her by knocking on her door.

“He was a nice little guy,” said neighbor Florida Paul. “I didn’t know him that well. He couldn’t hear so he really couldn’t talk — he just made noises, strange noises.”

The neighbor said Farr did not live at the apartment complex but frequently visited a woman who did.

Paul said the man had showed up at her own door a couple of weeks ago with multiple stab wounds to his forehead, but she refused to open the door and instead called 911.

“All I saw was like 10 holes in his forehead and blood gushing out, you could barely see his face,” the neighbor said. “But I wouldn’t open my door, because I didn’t know if whoever did that was behind him, and I’m on oxygen, I can’t fight.”

Police did not offer any details about that previous incident or say whether it was connected to Farr’s shooting death.

Chase told police she stayed with a family friend after the shooting and went to a store the next morning, before returning home to pick up clothes for church.

She told police that she called 911 after seeing Farr’s body on the sidewalk outside her door.

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2016 in American Genocide

 

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Yet Another Black Woman “Dead in Prison”

Yest another “mysterious death” of a black woman held in a jail…

The so called “choke hold” used in Martial Arts disciplines doesn’t produce unconsciousness by shutting of the air supply…It produces it by shutting off the blood supply to the brain. If you have ever watched MMA, check out how long it takes for these extremely well conditioned athletes to get up after being submitted with one of those holds. These holds can be lethal, which is why the referees in the sport are trained to jump in at the first sign of unconsciousness.

Using such on a child, with no threat of harm to anyone else is extreme. Yet another murder.

Detention staffer used martial arts hold on 16-year-old Gynnya McMillen before she was found dead: report

Gynnya McMillen

A staffer working at a Kentucky juvenile detention center used a martial arts hold on 16-year-old Gynnya McMillen hours before she was found dead in her cell,reports CBS.

According to a spokesperson for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice, the teen refused to remove her sweatshirt for a pat down search and to have her booking photo taken, leading a staffer to use an “Aikido restraint” on her in order to get her to comply.

“The staff performed an Aikido restraint hold to safely conduct a pat-down search and remove the youth’s hoodie,” spokesperson Stacy Floden stated. “The purpose of having multiple staff involved in a controlled restraint is to ensure the safety of the youth and staff.”

McMillen was found dead in her cell at the Lincoln Village Juvenile Detention Center on Jan. 11, after officials failed to check on her well-being throughout the night.

According to center policy, juvenile detainees in isolation cells must be checked on every 15 minutes by staffers.

On Thursday, Reginald Windham, a 10-year veteran of the juvenile justice department, was placed on administrative leave for failing to check on the teen.

According to the Kentucky Center for Investigative reporting, McMillen’s cold lifeless body was discovered “in a sleeping position” in a “secure” room at 9:55 a.m., after failing to respond to twice earlier when asked if she wanted to eat.

Despite her lack of communication, staffers never entered her cell to check on her.

According to the Hardin County coroner there were no obvious signs of trauma or a drug overdose, and that a toxicology report is still pending and could take two more weeks.

Juvenile justice expert Michele Deitch criticized the use of martial arts on the teen.

“I’ve never heard that phrase used in the context of a corrections setting,” Deitch said, adding refusal to remove a sweatshirt is not acceptable grounds for restraint.

“As far as I’m concerned that is a completely inappropriate use of a restraint,” Deitch said. “This goes back to not being so punitive with kids. That’s not just how you interact if you want to achieve a positive social response.”

McMillen was taken into custody after a fight at at a Shelby County residence shortly before 2 a.m. on Jan. 10, according to the Shelbyville Police Department. The teen was was charged with misdemeanor assault after leaving her victim with what were described as “minor injuries.”

The family of McMillen have asked for a full investigation into the teen’s death, and video from her cell has yet to be released.

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Ga Cop Indicted on Felony Murder for Killing Unarmed Black Man

Ga Cops have killed 170 people since 2010. Apparently, this one was too brazen to cover up.

Georgia cop indicted on murder charges for shooting unarmed naked vet suffering from PTSD

Minutes before being shot to death. As an Air Force veteran who had been deployed to Afghanistan, Anthony Hill had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and PTSD after returning from combat in 2012.

Instead of reaching for his pepper spray or his Taser, a DeKalb County police officer drew his gun and killed an unarmed veteran suffering from bipolar and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Charged with felony murder and several other charges on Thursday, the officer claims the unarmed veteran was aggressively charging towards him even though witnesses dispute his “official” version of events.

On March 9, 2015, residents called 911 to report a naked man crawling on the ground and acting deranged in the parking lot of their apartment complex.

As an Air Force veteran who had been deployed to Afghanistan, Anthony Hill had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and PTSD after returning from combat in 2012. Experiencing side effects from his medication, including a locked jaw and swollen tongue, Hill had stopped taking his prescription drugs ten days before his death while waiting for a follow-up appointment at the V.A. to switch his medications.

Responding to the scene, DeKalb County Police Officer Robert Olsen shot Hill to death because he claimed the unarmed veteran was charging towards him. Although he was reportedly armed with a Taser and pepper spray, Olsen immediately drew his firearm and gunned down Hill even though witnesses assert the naked veteran had his hands up when the officer killed him.

According to law enforcement sources who wish to remain unidentified, cops are often trained to treat naked suspects as drug addicts high on PCP or bath salts. Although Olsen received training on how to handle people suffering from mental illness, the officer reportedly described the department as having failed “to train him and the other officers in the Department in identifying and deciphering nonviolent or nonaggressive psychological episodes versus the threat of a potentially violent encounter with a citizen high on PCP.”

Filing a wrongful death lawsuit, Hill’s family accused Olsen of having “a long and extensive history of aggressive conduct” and “propensity toward anger when dealing with members of the public.”

Earlier this month, DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James Jr. asked a grand jury to charge Olsen with felony murder, aggravated assault, violating his oath of office, and making a false statement. Although over 170 fatal police shootings have been recorded in Georgia since 2010, only one officer has been charged with the killing of a civilian. That charge was later dismissed.

Despite the fact that Georgia state law allows police officers to address the panel without any threat of cross-examination or a rebuttal by prosecutors, the grand jury chose to indict Olsen on Thursday. His charges include two counts of felony murder, one count of aggravated assault, one count of making a false statement, and two counts of violation of oath by a public officer.

Unable to differentiate between aggressive suspects on PCP and nonviolent mentally ill patients off their medication, cops have repeatedly taken the lives of innocent people suffering from mental disorders. Instead of giving them the attention and treatment that they deserve, we as a society have neglected the mentally ill and allowed the government to increasingly close down mental health facilities. After decades of denying treatment and shelter to patients suffering from extreme psychological disorders, they’ve been thrown onto the streets and into the hands of the trigger-happy cops. And we can no longer act like we aren’t responsible for what inevitably happens next.

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Getting Away With Murder – 10,000 Shootings…13 Convictions

Since 2005, only 13 cops have been convicted of murder. Using this year as a baseline where Police shot over 1,000 citizens…That could be 10,000 shootings in the last decade. We know that a lot of those shootings haven’t exactly been the stereotypical shootout with Bank Robbers. And to update the author of this piece…There is something wrong with this picture.

Here’s How Many Cops Got Convicted Of Murder Last Year For On-Duty Shootings

There’s something strange about this picture.

Many people viewed 2015 as a year of reckoning for police, with continued scrutiny of the use of deadly force spurring momentum for reform. In reality, however, the road to accountability remains a long one.

That point is clearly reflected in the number of police officers who were convicted on murder or manslaughter charges last year for fatally shooting a civilian in the line of duty.

In 2015, that number was zero.

And that’s not unusual. No officers were convicted on such charges in 2014 either.

In fact, since 2005, there have only been 13 officers convicted of murder or manslaughter in fatal on-duty shootings, according to data provided to The Huffington Post by Philip Stinson, an associate professor of criminology at Ohio’s Bowling Green State University. Stinson’s data doesn’t include cases in which civilians died in police custody or were killed by other means, or those in which officers only faced lesser charges.

One of the last successful convictions came in 2013, when Culpeper Town, Virginia, police officer Daniel Harmon-Wright was sentenced to three years in jail for voluntary manslaughter charges in the slaying of Patricia Cook, an unarmed 54-year-old, a year earlier.

On Feb. 9, 2012, Harmon-Wright responded to a suspicious vehicle call and found Cook parked in a local Catholic school parking lot. In court, Harmon-Wright said when he asked Cook for her driver’s license, she rolled up her window, trapping his arm, before beginning to drive away. Harmon-Wright responded by unloading seven rounds into Cook, with fatal shots hitting her in the back and head. But a jury didn’t find the officer’s testimony credible, returning a guilty verdict on three charges in the shooting death. After serving out his sentence, Harmon-Wright was releasedin 2015.

Some officers in these cases have served out yearslong sentences for their crimes. Others were in and out of jail in months. Some even became police officers again. But only a tiny portion of cops who kill while on duty ever face charges for their actions, much less actual punishment.

The inability to convict police on murder or manslaughter charges for fatal on-duty shootings contrasts with a recent increase in prosecution, Stinson said. In 2015, 18 officers faced such charges, a significant increase from an average of around five officers each year over the preceding decade. Many of these cases involved incidents from previous years and have yet to go to trial, but if history is any indicator, it seems unlikely that many of the officers will be convicted.

The tiny number of convictions in fatal police shootings looks even smaller when you consider just how many cases the criminal justice system considers each year. Although there are no reliable government statistics on civilians killed by police, data compiled independently last year by outlets like The Guardian and The Washington Post, or civilian tracker Mapping Police Violence, have led to estimates of roughly 1,000 deadly shootings each year.

Of that total, prosecutors and grand juries around the nation each year have determined that around five of these cases involve misconduct worthy of manslaughter or murder charges. And in the end, the criminal justice system typically concludes that only around one shooting each year is consistent with manslaughter or murder.

This means the overwhelming majority of police shooting cases are ultimately determined to be justified homicides, in which deadly force was used lawfully, often in what police say was an effort to protect an officer’s safety or to prevent harm to the public.

One reason for the lack of prosecution and subsequent conviction begins with the Supreme Court’s legal standard for use of lethal force. According to Graham v. Connor, the landmark 1989 case that established the standard, each “use of force must be judged from the perspective of a reasonable officer on the scene, rather than with the 20/20 vision of hindsight.” The ruling specifically cautions against judging police too harshly for split-second decisions made in “tense, uncertain and rapidly evolving” situations. All of this gives officers plenty of leeway to explain why their actions were legal…Read the rest Here

 
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Posted by on January 13, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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First NYC Officer Charged With Eric Garner Death

Been a long time coming, and as we have seen in previous cases it doesn’t mean there will be a conviction…

New York police sergeant facing internal charges in chokehold death

A New York City police sergeant is facing internal disciplinary charges for her role in the chokehold death of an unarmed black man whose fatal police encounter in 2014 spurred nationwide protests.

Sergeant Kizzy Adonis was served with departmental charges on Friday, police officials said, and placed on modified duty. Adonis is the first officer to be formally charged with wrongdoing in connection with Eric Garner’s death.

Adonis was supervising officers at the scene and the department did not specify the exact charges she faces.

Garner died on July 17, 2014, after Officer Daniel Pantaleo placed his arm around Garner’s neck. Police had stopped Garner on a sidewalk in the New York City borough of Staten Island on suspicion of selling loose cigarettes. His final words, “I can’t breathe,” were captured on video and became a rallying cry for protesters.

The Garner case was one of several high-profile instances in which unarmed black people died in police encounters, opening up a national debate over race, violence and policing.

A grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo in December 2014, sparking renewed protests throughout New York. The U.S. Justice Department is investigating the incident as a potential civil rights violation.

The police department had put its internal review on hold at the request of federal prosecutors. But police said the decision to bring departmental charges against Adonis was prompted by a disciplinary statute of limitations that applied to her case but not Pantaleo’s.

“All further proceedings concerning the Garner inquiry will continue to be stayed until the conclusion of the federal investigation,” the department said in a statement.

The sergeants’ union did not immediately comment.

The city agreed in July 2015 to pay Garner’s family $5.9 million to settle wrongful death claims. A lawyer for the family did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

 
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Posted by on January 9, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Walter Scott Murderer Granted Bail

Many states won’t grant bail in Capital crimes…Just another one of those insider deals for “special people”…

Beginning to look like they guy appointed to “oversee” the case is another one of those “special DA’s” whose job is to let the bad cop off.

Michael Slager, S.C. Cop Who Killed Unarmed Motorist Walter Scott, Granted $500,000 Bond

Michael Slager, the North Charleston, South Carolina, cop who killed Walter Scott as he was running away — which was all dramatically captured on chilling cell-phone video — was granted bond Monday after a judge expressed concerns that it was taking too long to bring him to trial.

A grand jury indicted Slager, 34, on a charge of murder after the video surfaced of him shooting Scott, 50, eight times after Scott had turned his back and fled after a daytime traffic stop on April 4.

Scott was black and Slager is white, and the shooting renewed tension in the coastal town over alleged excessive police use of force and systemic racism.

Slager was denied bond in September, but state Circuit Judge Clifton Newman, whom the state Supreme Court appointed to oversee the sensitive case, said Monday that he could go free on house arrest on a $500,000 surety bond.

The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office Monday evening had indicated that Slager was freed after posting bond, but it later said he was still in custody as of 6 p.m. ET.

Slager’s trial isn’t scheduled until Oct. 31 — more than a year and a half after Scott’s death — because prosecutors said they had to give precedence to the trial of Dylann Roof in the June shooting deaths of nine people at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, which is scheduled for July.

Slager’s lawyers argued that keeping him in jail that long without trial was tantamount to punishing him for a crime he hadn’t been convicted of yet.

Under a typical surety bond, Slager would have to put up 10 percent of the order — in this case, $50,000 of personal funds — to engage a third party to guarantee he will show up for court appearances. Newman said Slager would be able to leave his home only for court hearings and to visit his attorneys, doctors or church.

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Chicago – Judge Finds Prosecutor Hid Evidence in Police Murder

The possibility of real justice in Chicago…

Judge finds city lawyer hid evidence in Chicago police shooting, orders new trial

Chicago police officer Gildardo Sierra, left, and Darius Pinex.

A top city attorney intentionally concealed crucial evidence in a civil trial over a fatalChicago police shooting and then lied about his reasons for doing so, a federal judge ruled Monday in a scathing opinion.

In overturning the jury’s verdict and ordering a new trial, U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang imposed sanctions against the city and Senior Corporation Counsel Jordan Marsh, ordering that they pay attorney’s fees to the plaintiffs that likely will amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars even before a retrial could take place.

“Attorneys who might be tempted to bury late-surfacing information need to know that, if discovered, any verdict they win will be forfeit and their clients will pay the price,” Chang wrote in his 72-page opinion. “They need to know it is not worth it.”

Chang faulted lax training and oversight at the city’s Law Department for hampering the production of records from the Chicago Police Department and other city agencies when officers are accused of misconduct.

Steve Greenberg, an attorney who represents the family of the man who was killed, said the ruling raises questions about the Law Department’s role in perpetuating a code-of-silence police culture in which officers believe they can act with impunity. If the city’s attorneys appear willing to cover up wrongdoing, the officers will feel empowered to behave in any manner they deem fit, he said.

“There’s just a total disregard for the truth, and it runs to the highest levels,” Greenberg said. “There is a culture to cover up and win at all costs.”

A Law Department spokesman had no immediate comment Monday. Thomas Leinenweber, an attorney who represents Marsh, did not immediately respond to an email or phone call seeking comment.

The embarrassing setback for the city comes amid continuing fallout over the unrelated police shooting of 17-year-oldLaquan McDonald in October 2014. The scandal that erupted in November after video was released showing Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting McDonald 16 times prompted the U.S. Justice Department to launch a wide-ranging civil rights investigation into the use of force by Chicago police.

Chang’s ruling reverses a decision last April in which a federal jury found in favor of Officers Raoul Mosqueda and Gildardo Sierra, concluding they were justified in killing Darius Pinex during a January 2011 traffic stop on Chicago’s South Side. Both officers testified at the trial that they had pulled Pinex’s Oldsmobile over because it matched a description they had heard over their police radios of a car wanted in an earlier shooting.

In a front-page story in September, the Tribune detailed how the officers’ account of what precipitated their encounter with Pinex had begun to unravel in the midst of the trial.

According to court records, Sierra and Mosqueda did not hear the dispatch as they originally claimed because it aired over a different radio zone. It wasn’t until the middle of the trial that Marsh admitted — outside the presence of the jury — that he had failed to turn over a recording of the dispatch that actually went out over the officers’ Zone 6 radios that night, a call that talked about a different Oldsmobile Aurora that didn’t match Pinex’s car and was not wanted in connection with a shooting.

Marsh first said he had learned about the recording that day, then later said he had actually found out about it the week before trial. When the judge pressed Marsh on why he hadn’t disclosed the existence of the recording as soon as he learned of it from a police sergeant, the lawyer backpedaled more, saying it hadn’t crossed his mind that it would be something that might be helpful to the plaintiffs.

“My thought process was, I want to see what is on that (recording),” he said. “You know in retrospect I think I should have, but I wanted to talk to the sergeant and to see whether it was even relevant.”

In his ruling, Chang said Marsh, a seasoned attorney who for years has defended police accused of wrongdoing, “intentionally concealed” the existence of the emergency dispatch and then misled the court about his thought process for withholding it.

“After hiding the information, despite there being numerous times when the circumstances dictated he say something about it, Marsh said nothing, and even made misleading statements to the court when the issue arose,” Chang wrote. “… That an experienced lawyer like Marsh did not even consider the possibility that this evidence might not go his way is unlikely to the extreme.”

The judge also found that Marsh’s co-counsel, city attorney Thomas Aumann, had failed to make a reasonable effort to find the dispatch recording during the initial discovery process. In sanctioning the city for Aumann’s actions, Chang said the Law Department’s practices put its attorneys “at risk” for violating discovery rules because of a lack of training on how to request and collect documents and evidence.

Chang said the city’s attorneys showed a lack of understanding about what evidence is preserved by police and how to ask for it — including detectives’ reports, emergency recordings, computer logs and inventories from arrests.

The judge said that with tight budgets and overworked staff, he understands city lawyers “have a tough job” in responding to discovery requests involving a Police Department that preserves such a massive quantity of records. But that’s all the more reason to instill procedures to minimize mistakes, he said.

“Failing to do so will cost even more in the long run, not just in dollars,” the judge wrote.

 

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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