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Mexican Beer Company Trolls Trumpazoids

Spanish, just like any other living language, has it’s own regional colloquialisms. Americans should be familiar with this because of the number of sayings and words entering the lexicon from the popular and black American culture. Learned my Spanish by spending over a year on the border and befriending several Mexican people. Being surrounded by people who speak a different language is the fastest way I know of to learn a new language. I was initially surprised at the number of colloquialisms and sayings that they don’t teach you in Spanish class – which were relevant only to Mexican culture.

In this video, two employees of a Mexican Brewing Company are trolling Chumph Supporters with free T-Shirts. To the uninitiated, the t-shirts seem to be supportive of Trump. To any speaker of Mexican Spanish familiar with the people’s saying…It means something quite different. The saying “el que lo lea” literally means “You are what you read” It derives from a saying “Puto el que lo lea”, which means whomever reads this is a faggot”…

The T-shirt has a big picture of Trump, with a red clown nose. So what the saying on the front, “Hasta el que lo lea” means….”Whomever wears this is a clown”.

Mexican brewery trolls Trump supporters with hilarious trick T-shirts

Mexican craft brewery Cerveza Cucapá launched a hilarious campaign — not for a wall but for beer — and “Donald Trump is going to pay for our beers,” they say.

A Spanish-language video was published during the first presidential debate, showing a man who traveled to Los Angeles and sold Trump T-shirts to unsuspecting Trump supporters. While the shirt read “Donald el que lo lea,” and showed the Republican nominee in a clown nose, no one noticed it was mocking Trump. The phrase is a variation of a well-known Mexican saying that only Mexicans and Mexican-Americanswould understand.

Cucapá founder Mario García explained to Vice that the campaign came from Trump himself, who has claimed that Mexico will pay for the wall on the U.S. border. “Well, Donald Trump is gonna pay for our beers, even though he doesn’t know it yet,” García said.

While getting Trump himself to cough up the cash proved more difficult, their T-shirt trick worked wonders on the Venice Beach boardwalk, along Hollywood Boulevard and Huntington Beach.

The first sale on video shows García sitting next to an old white man at a bus stop. He asks who the man, “Are you a Donald supporter?” The man says that he is, and snags a T-shirt.

The plan worked, except with the police, who seemed to have problems with T-shirt stand and further that García was filming interactions.

“Two police officers wanted to take away our merchandise and another moved us on,” she said. “There were a lot of people that insulted us, threw our merchandise on the floor, and shouted at us for supporting Trump, but there were also a lot of people who wanted to buy the shirts.”

The border issue has always been something that the brewery has talked about. Founded in 2002, their first location was in Mexicali and gets their name from the indigenous Cocopah tribe, that settled on both sides of the U.S. and Mexican borders.

“At Cucapá we’ve always carried the theme of the border in our DNA, so it was very natural for us as a brand to want to do something about Trump,” García said.

 

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2016 in Chumph Butt Kicking

 

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Text Book Wars in Texas – Coming to Your Schools

In the School Textbook industry, the State of Texas has out sized influence because books are standardized throughout the state by an appointed Commission. The textbook manufacturers don’t make separate textbooks for every state, they instead make a few standard versions, one based on Texas, which they sell to the nation’s school systems more cheaply than the school systems cost to develop a new book.

Conservative majorities on the Texas Textbook commission the last decade or so have resulted in textbooks following the conservative, and often racist beliefs of the far right.

You get not only the Southern Myth (slaves were well treated and happy), but the introduction of their own perverted “christian” beliefs…And now Mexicans are lazy drunks, and Hispanics are inferior to whites.

Image result for mexican stereotypes

For the complete list in he “textbook” go here.

Texas teachers are rebelling against a new racist textbook that portrays Mexicans as lazy drunks

 

Texas college and high school teachers say a textbook that has been proposed for Mexican-American Studies high school class is chock-full of errors and omissions. If that isn’t enough, it’s also racist.

According to Fusion, Texas State Board of Education member Ruben Cortez Jr. demanded that the board reject the textbook on the basis of the racism but also on the 68 factual errors, 42 interpretive errors and 31 omission errors.

“It is an utter shame we must deal with racially offensive academic work,” said Cortez Jr. at a press conference.

The Texas Tribune cites one passage in the commission report that states, “Stereotypically, Mexicans were viewed as lazy compared to European or American workers … Mexican laborers were not reared to put in a full day’s work so vigorously … It was also traditional to skip work on Mondays, and drinking on the job could be a problem.”

South Texas College history professor Trinidad Gonzales called the book nothing but “a web of racist assertions.”

“It was very difficult to get through it because of the significant errors that kept popping up,” he said. He said that one passage was “anti-Catholic” because it claims that Catholics’ only loyalty is to the Pope.

But Republican board member David Bradley saw racism in the fact that the teachers were bringing up racism to begin with.

“Are we not being a little discriminatory in singling out one group?” he said. “I am French-Irish, and you don’t see the French or the Irish pounding the table wanting special treatment, do you?”

He believes that the course isn’t a required class and schools should be more focused on preparing students for college. Because the course isn’t required, school districts also have an option to choose whatever textbook they want for the class. Still, the members of the commission are hoping to ban the book from being used.

The full report goes line by line through the textbook with examples of attacks on Native people in North, Central and South America being far less “civilized” than Europeans. It claims that Mexicans and Mexican-Americans with “Indian heritage remain skeptical of modern society.”

The book’s racist stereotypes shouldn’t be surprising because the book was crafted by a textbook company run by former school board member Cynthia Dunbar. She is infamous for admitting that during her time on the board she worked to correct a “biblically illiterate society.” Dunbar now works at the right-wing Christian college Liberty University and worked on Ted Cruz’s campaign in Virginia.

She claimed that she tried to work with the commission but was turned away and to this day has only been told of one error in the book. The commission report, however, details all 141 errors and racist citations. She swears that she wants to create objective textbooks.

 

 
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Posted by on September 8, 2016 in American Genocide, The Definition of Racism

 

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So How Did That Trip to Mexico Work Out, Payaso?

And if you don’t speak Spanish – here is what the term “payaso” means…

 

 
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Posted by on September 1, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Understanding the War Against NAFTA

And you have to wonder why people are pissed?

Souring Chicago’s sweet treat: Corporate greed, American unions, and moving the Oreo to Mexico

Corporate executives saved $47 million by moving Oreo production to Mexico, but cost 600 in Chicago their jobs

For generations, kids from age 3 to 100 have loved munching on chocolaty Oreo cookies dipped in a glass of milk. But just over a year, ago, the tasty treat suddenly went sour.

In May 2015, bakery workers in Nabisco’s monumental 10-story plant in Chicago’s Marquette Park neighborhood had been expecting some sweet news from their corporate headquarters. Rumor had it that their renowned facility  after more than half a century and millions of Oreos — was about to receive a $130-million modernization investment to upgrade equipment and to add new production lines. So, the future looked bright and spirits were high on May 15 of last year when management convened members of Local 300 of the Bakery Workers Union to announce that the investment was indeed going to be made.

In Salinas, Mexico.

For decades, the Marquette Park community has been proud that the delectable smell of “milk’s favorite cookie” wafts through their neighborhood. But the noses of Nabisco’s corporate brass are clogged with greed, incapable of sniffing out anything but ever-fatter profits for themselves and other rich shareholders. Taking the NAFTA low road, they intend to move the iconic Oreo brand — and the jobs of 600 top-quality bakery workers — from Chicago to Mexico, where the minimum wage is a bit more than $4. Not per hour, but per day.

This is the tyranny of corporate globalization in action. In 2012 Kraft Foods split off its grocery business, which retained the Kraft name, and rebranded its remaining snack-food empire as Mondelez International, which includes Nabisco and its many brands including Triscuit, Planters nuts, Ritz crackers, Chips Ahoy and Oreos.

Such corporate empires now reign over millions of working families, arrogantly and even lawlessly making self-serving decisions from within the shrouded confines of faraway executive suites — wreaking havoc on workers, local economies, democratic values, and our sense of community. People affected are given no input or warning (much less any real say-so) in the profiteering that now routinely strikes us, like a lightning bolt from hell.

Worse, the so-called humans who’ve enthroned themselves with this autocratic power find it amusing to toy with those they rule over. Mondelez executives did exactly that after their sneak attack on Chicago’s bakery workers. In a crude ploy to shift blame for the loss of jobs to the union, the plutocratic powerhouse claimed it had made an offer to Local 300 to keep producing Oreos in Chicago, but that recalcitrant union officials refused.

Of course they did, for Mondelez essentially proposed that the workers commit mass financial suicide. Here’s the “offer”: Since the move to Mexico is expected to save $46 million a year, the conglomerate would graciously let the 600 ransom their jobs by paying that $46 million themselves. Just slash your annual pay and benefits (as well as your throats) by that amount, the executives told the union, and you can keep making Oreos for us.

This act was an astonishing, unprecedented insulting slap in the face of every middle-class worker in the U.S. Mondelez sapsuckers were effectively demanding that longtime, dedicated, productive employees subsidize the conglomerate and ransom their livelihoods by reducing their income to poverty. Note that Mondelez banked $7 billion in profit last year.

If its executives are so inept that they can’t find an honest way to fill a $46-million hole, they should dock the pay of their top three executives by that amount. They can damn sure afford it, for they totaled $37 million in compensation last year. CEO Irene Rosenfeld alone took a $20 million paycheck in 2015, bringing her eight-year total pay and benefits to almost $200 million.

 
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Posted by on June 23, 2016 in American Greed

 

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When Mexico Wanted a Wall To Keep Americans Out

Seems that after the Civil War, Mexico was fine with Immigration…Just not black folks immigrating.

1.38 Million Afro-Mexicans live in Mexico today. For decades successive Mexican Governments tried to erase the fact of their existence. Only in 2015 did the Mexican Government finally recognize their existence.

When Mexicans Feared American Immigration

When the path to upward mobility for thousands of free black Americans was south of the border, Mexico stopped just short of calling for their own wall.

If there is one issue that has steered 2016 in a startling direction, it has been immigration. The GOP’s strategy to increase its appeal to Latinos after Mitt Romney’s upset in 2012 quickly unraveled once the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, charged that Mexico was sending “criminals, drug dealers, rapists” to the United States. Before long, chants of “Build that wall!”—a reference to Trump’s promise to construct a “beautiful” concrete wall along the Mexican border—could be heard at political rallies, high school sporting events and beyond. The GOP’s concerns about inclusion, it seems, pale in comparison to Americans’ anxieties about jobs, crime, national security and the sense that there is a teeming mass of people desperate to burst across the border.

It hasn’t always been this way; for much of American history, the U.S.-Mexico border has been largely unprotected. Only in 1891 did the United States start deporting illegal immigrants (a category at the time limited principally to Chinese workers as well as felons, paupers and the insane), and it wasn’t until 1924 that Congress formed the Border Patrol. And at one point, remarkably, our contemporary debate was even flipped: Hordes of Americans wanted to escape their bleak prospects for a better life—and the place they wanted to flee to was Mexico.

Carmen Robles, afromexican colonel in Mexican revolution.

But Mexico didn’t want them. The story unfolded in the late 19th century, in the form of a little-known black migration scheme to the low-lying, underdeveloped parts of south and central Mexico—Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Michoacán and San Luis Potosi—and was spearheaded by a man sparingly remembered by history. He intended [to avoid repeating scheme] to relocate thousands of black families to start a new colony in Mexico, which would have radically changed the demographics and the economy of that region, if not all of Mexico. The plan provoked sensationalist, often racist, reports in the Mexican press—one warned of a “race war”—and fiery fights in the country’s Senate. In the end, it failed—no such colony was ever settled. But the history lesson, of a time when our current debate was flipped on its head, is a timely reminder of those fluid identities, and just how easily these centuries-old, deeply ingrained fears can be stoked—on either side of the border.

Born as a slave in 1894 on a cotton plantation in the small South Texas town of Victoria, William Henry Ellis managed in his early 20s to transform himself into a successful merchant in San Antonio. To do so, however, he had to craft an alternative persona for himself as a Mexican named Guillermo Enrique Eliseo (his name translated into Spanish) to gain entry to the all-white business settings that would have otherwise been closed to him. To further his ethnic charades, Ellis cultivated a showy Mexican-style mustache, dressed in the Mexican fashion, and used the fluent Spanish that he had learned in Victoria as a child.

In the 19th century, during the administration of President Porifirio Díaz, Mexico was hoping to modernize its economy by attracting more immigrants. Ellis did much of his business across the border in Mexico, and he saw the United States’ southern neighbor, with its lack of legal segregation, as a place of great promise not only for himself but for other African-Americans as well. He thus set in motion in 1889 an ambitious plan to facilitate the large-scale migration of African-Americans to Mexico.

Vicente Guerrero, a mulatto and Mexico`s 2nd president, was a hero in Mexico`s War of Independence from Spain, and an active abolitionist. The state of Guerrero in Mexico was named in his honor. His grandson, Vicente Riva Palacio y Guerrero, was one of Mexico`s most influential politicians and novelists.

Taking advantage of new railroad connections between the U.S. and Mexico, Ellis journeyed to Mexico City. Tucked in his luggage, he carried letters of introduction from the Mexican consul in San Antonio to Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Ignacio Mariscal, and Secretary of Fomento (Public Works), Carlos Pacheco Villalobos. Once in the Mexican capital, Ellis persuaded Pacheco, a grizzled former general who had lost both an arm and a leg in Mexico’s recent war against the French-backed emperor Maximilian, to grant him a 10-year contract to colonize up to twenty thousand settlers in Mexico. Although the race and nationality of the colonists was not specified in the contract—only that each colonist would have a certificate attesting to their “morality, honesty and diligence”—Ellis’s comments to the press left little doubt that he intended to fill the colonists’ ranks with African-Americans.

The colonization movement represented one of the most divisive fault lines running through African-American politics in the late 19th century. Even as they defended the right of blacks to live wherever they pleased, most black leaders, from Frederick Douglass to Norris Wright Cuney, the influential chairman of the Texas’ Republican Party, decried efforts to relocate African-Americans (a movement known in the language of the day as colonization). These figures charged that colonization not only diminished the pool of African-American voters in the United States; it also encouraged long-standing white fantasies of solving the United States’ “race problem” by ethnically cleansing all blacks from the nation. Even the great liberator Abraham Lincoln had briefly entertained thoughts of colonizing freed slaves on Mexico’s Tehuantepec isthmus or Yucatán peninsula. Above all, by presenting blacks’ real home as elsew

The most famous black Mexican was Gaspar Yanga, whom was a Mandingo slave brought to Mexico from Cuba to work the sugarcane Plantations. He successfully led a series of revolts resulting in the slaves overthrowing the Plantation owners, and founding the first free slave town in the Americas, which bears his name.

here, emigration diverted attention from what many African-Americans perceived as the more pressing task: achieving their full civil rights in the United States. “I cannot see wherein [African-Americans] would gain anything [by colonization],” contended Cuney. “They are so thoroughly identified with the perpetuity of our American institutions, that it seems to me to be rather late for them now to seek homes in a new country with the customs, government and people of which they are thoroughly unacquainted. There is much more glory, honor and gain for the colored man here in the land of his birth, and here he should stay and fight his way to the front.” 

Relocating to Mexico, however, did not necessarily represent a retreat from politics in Ellis’s eyes. Rather, it highlighted the shortcomings of Reconstruction—in particular, the federal government’s failure to support blacks’ economic aspirations. Whites blamed the poverty in which blacks found themselves trapped after Emancipation on a lack of work ethic. Ellis, in contrast, knew that the problem lay not with African-American character but rather with their lack of access to land, the foundation of wealth in a predominantly agricultural society. If the place of their birth would not facilitate black access to property, perhaps Mexico, in its desire to attract immigrants, would. “The idea of Mr. Ellis,” explained one observer, “is that the colonists will become self-sustaining farmers.”

Colonization tended to draw its support from the most marginalized members of the black community—those, unsurprisingly, who suffered the worst oppressions and therefore had the least to lose in relocating to an unfamiliar land. Even before Ellis finalized his contract with the Mexican government, he had compiled a list of several hundred families from four adjoining Texas counties— Fort Bend, Matagorda, Brazoria and Wharton, all “places where the colored people have been having trouble” in Ellis’s apt phrase—who had expressed interest in moving to Mexico. These counties were home to the largest African-American majorities in all of Texas. Not only had these conditions led unsympathetic whites to dub the region “Senegambia”; it also spawned fierce racial strife as local whites endeavored, despite the demographic imbalance, to “free . . . themselves from Negro rule” by threatening the area’s black elected officials….Read The Rest of This Engrossing Story Here

The Los Angeles Pobladores, or “townspeople,” were a group of 44 settlers and four soldiers from Mexico who established the famed city on this day in 1781 in what is now California. The settlers came from various Spanish castes, with over half of the group being of African descent.

 

 
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Posted by on June 5, 2016 in Black History

 

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PGA Dumps Tournament at Trump Course and Goes to Mexico

Mexico Birdie…Trump double Bogey…

The Trump “brand” is taking a whipping from the reactions to his racist comments. His Hotel bookings are down as much as 62%. His Casino is bankrupt, Major corporations have pulled support for the Republican Convention…

And now in a double slap, the PGA is not only yanking their major Spring event from Trump’s Doral Golf Course after 54 years – but they are moving it “across the wall” to Mexico. And did I mention, Cadillac has dropped sponsorship?

Not to mention the first of several cases against Trump’s fraudulent business practices (Trump University) are getting hot. Next in line is his fake drug supplements.

Golf tournament leaving Trump’s Doral course for Mexico, chairman says

The annual event, in Doral since 1962, is moving to Mexico City

The PGA gave Doral no indication if it will ever return to South Florida

This comes six months after the PGA said it reevaluate the future of the tournament because of Trump’s controversial comments about Muslims

The annual PGA golf tournament at Doral, a staple of South Florida sports for 54 years, is relocating to Mexico City, the tournament’s outgoing chairman said Wednesday.

Butch Buchholz, who ran the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral, said the PGA informed him on Tuesday night that it made the decision to leave South Florida because it couldn’t find a title sponsor to replace Cadillac.

“I believe they are sincere when they said they didn’t want to leave an event with a 54-year history,” Buchholz said. “They’ve got an obligation to their board and they couldn’t find a sponsor so they had to move. They don’t have a choice. The PGA Tour didn’t have a choice, If you don’t have a sponsor what can you do?”

Donald Trump foreshadowed the news on an interview with Fox’s Sean Hannity on Tuesday night.

“I mean, I just heard that the PGA Tour is taking their tournament out of Miami and moving it to Mexico as an example,” Trump said. “They’re taking it — it’s at Doral, it’s at — they used one of my places. They’re moving their tournament, it’s the Cadillac World Golf Championship. And Cadillac’s been a great sponsor, but they’re moving it to Mexico. They’re moving it to Mexico City which, by the way, I hope they have kidnapping insurance. But they’re moving it to Mexico City. And I’m saying, you know, what’s going on here? It is so sad when you look at what’s going on with our country.”

The PGA said in December that it would “explore all options regarding the event’s future” in the wake of Trump’s controversial proposal last year to ban Muslim immigrants from entering the United States.

Buchholz said he did not know whether Trump’s comments were the primary reason why the PGA was unable to find a sponsor to replace Cadillac, which informed the tour a year ago that it would not renew.

PGA Tour officials could not immediately be reached.

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Mexicans Feeling the Love for Trump

As is a custom in Mexico, the effigies of the evil are burned at Easter…This year, Donald Trump and “El Chapo” the drug kingpin were quite popular.

 
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Posted by on March 27, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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