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VP Elect Mike Pence Booed at Hamilton Play

Don’t hold back!

And a few choice words from the cast of Hamilton to the most racist presidential administration since Wilson…

“We are the diverse America that are alarmed and anxious that you and your administration will not protect us, our planet, our children, our parents or defend us and uphold our inalienable rights, sir,” he began. “We hope that this show has inspired you to uphold our American values and work on behalf of all of us.”

 
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Posted by on November 19, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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Queen Bey and Old White Republicans

Queen Bey’s Superbowl appearance and dropping a new song has apparently set off the conservative Viagra set… Mere mention of blackness, the original Black Panthers, police, and BLM will do that.

Rudy Giuliani rips Beyoncé’s Super Bowl halftime as an “outrageous … attack on police officers”

Beyoncé anticipated this. She knew the backlash was coming as she sings in her new single “Formation,” “You know you that b**ch when you cause all this conversation.” With her imagery of police officers lined in riot gear with their arms in the air in her music video and her background dancers dressed as Black Panthers during her halftime performance at Super Bowl 50, Beyoncé is undoubtedly making a bold political statement and as she surely expected, people are talking.

“I thought it was really outrageous that she used it as a platform to attack police officers who are the people who protect her and protect us, and keep us alive,” former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani said Monday on “Fox & Friends,” ripping the performance as “ridiculous.”

Cuz nothing brings us all together better than angry @Beyonceshaking her ass & shouting “Negro” repeatedly.

“The vast majority of police officers risk their lives to keep us safe,”Giuliani explained, taking issue with what he deemed an inappropriate “political position” at the Super Bowl. “What we should be doing in the African-American community, and all communities, is build up respect for police officers,” he offered. “You’re talking to middle America when you have the Super Bowl,” Giuliani reminded the co-hosts. “Let’s have, you know, decent wholesome entertainment, and not use it as a platform to attack the people who, you know, put their lives at risk to save us.”
Bobbye Bogart Orona

I don’t usually hashtag but the fact that they invited Beyoncé to perform an anti-police song during the Super Bowl is infuriating & inflammatory. They should be ashamed of themselves.
‪#‎NFL‬‪#‎Beyonce‬
‪#‎BoycottBeyonce‬
‪#‎BoycottNFL‬
‪#‎BoycottPepsi‬

According to the Washington Examiner, Members of the National Sheriffs’ Association meeting in Washington, D.C. collectively turned their backs during the halftime performance to protest Beyoncé. The group’s president, Sheriff Danny Glick of Laramie County, Wyoming, “called on the NFL to choose less controversial half time entertainment in the future.”

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in Giant Negros, Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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On Nikki Haley and BLM

Interesting article over at Slate by  claiming that Governor Nikki Haley’s SOTU speech included barbs against BLM. I think that is a faulty analysis. Specifically Bouie has problems about the part of her speech where she discusses Haley’s description of South Carolina’s response to the Charleston Massacre, and compares that to the rioting in Baltimore and Ferguson. That’s false equivalency on multiple levels..Here are two:.

First, the bad actors in Ferguson and Baltimore were representatives of Law Enforcement and the Judicial in the states. Dylaan Root was not. Nor did the State of South Carolina in any way sanction or support Root’s actions, unlike in Ferguson. Black folks in this country riot in frustration of powerlessness which is state sanctioned. White folks may riot simply because they have run out of beer.

So far from being “noble”, the simple fact is – black folks are likely to respond to heinous acts by a lone individual for exactly what it is…Murder and domestic terrorism.

Second, BLM had nothing to do with starting, formulating, or participating in either the Baltimore or Ferguson “riots”. Claiming they are somehow “responsible” is a stretch, unless you buy into the old racist axiom that “three black people on a street corner is a riot”. Bouie’s piece facilitates, instead of exposes that sort f thinking for what it is.

Nikki Haley’s Family

A little on Haley’s background

Yet Haley’s approach to South Carolina has not been simply an empty deployment of stale rhetoric. She opened her first inaugural address, in 2011, by remarking on South Carolina’s contributions to the Revolutionary War, but then offered a notable departure from that theme. “Of course, when talking about our past, it would be wrong to mention our greatness during the revolutionary period without noting the ugliness of much that followed. The horrors of slavery and discrimination need not be retold here. They, too, remain a part of our history and a part of the fabric of our lives.”

It was an exceptional moment. Haley, the first Indian-American and first female governor of South Carolina, had begun her first official address to the state—about sixty-eight per cent white—with a reference to the historical fact of slavery and its contemporary significance. Haley has also spoken about the prejudices she encountered as part of the only Sikh family in Bamberg, South Carolina, which was “not white enough to be white, not black enough to be black.” Three months after the shooting in Charleston, Haley, addressing the National Press Club, described seeing her father, a botany professor at a historically black college, racially profiled at a farmers’ market when she was ten years old.

So…While Haley is undoubtedly a Republican, and has been seduced by the false and corrupted canards of conservatism…Nikki doesn’t buy in to the racist memes of those elements of her Party. Ergo – Simply believing in “smaller government”…Doesn’t make you a bigot. I’m sure of you that have read Sun Tsu…There is a part in there about picking the right enemy along with the know your enemy part. Nikki isn’t your friend from a policy and politic standpoint, but unlike some of the black conservative blowmonkey Lawn Jockeys who prostitute their race…She isn’t entirely your enemy.

Which isn’t to say she didn’t take a shot at BLM as being responsible for the now thoroughly discredited “Ferguson Effect”

To an even greater extent than Obama, Haley, as a Republican, is dependent upon the narrative of apparent progress. Obama’s first Presidential campaign was derided early on as a vehicle for white liberals’ absolution, but conservatives often ask their nonwhite candidates to help them forget that there was ever anything to be absolved. This is why, when speaking of Sandra Bland, for instance, Ben Carson objected to the tendency to “inject” race into situations where it does not belong. Haley deployed a version of this thinking at the Press Club, when she spoke of the swift indictment of the officer who shot Walter Scott in the back multiple times, in North Charleston, South Carolina, but then implied that the Black Lives Matter movement was responsible for intimidating police officers to the point that black lives are now in further jeopardy. Haley said:

You know what? Black lives do matter. Most of the people killed or injured in the riots in Ferguson and Baltimore were black. Think about it. Most of the small businesses or social-service institutions that were destroyed and looted in Ferguson and Baltimore were either black-owned or served heavily black populations. Most of the people who now live in terror because local police are too intimidated to do their jobs are black. Black lives do matter, and they have been disgracefully jeopardized by the movement that has laid waste to Ferguson and Baltimore.

This awkward logic is part of a larger idea that Haley articulates frequently: that discord is potentially as destructive as injustice. Haley has noted time and again that in the aftermath of the Emanuel A.M.E. shooting, last summer, South Carolina did not erupt into violence. In that respect, however, South Carolina is not exceptional: there was not violence after the decision not to indict Officer Timothy Loehmann in Tamir Rice’s death, in Cleveland, or after the acquittal of George Zimmerman, in the death of Trayvon Martin. The explosions in Ferguson and Baltimore have been the exceptions. Resignation, resentment, and despair are the rules.

Nikki Haley’s State of the Union Rebuttal Was Anti–Black Lives Matter

The South Carolina governor’s pleasant-sounding speech hid an ugly message.

On Tuesday, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley lived up to the hype. Tasked with giving the Republican Party’s response to President Obama’s final State of the Union address, Haley excelled, besting predecessors in a difficult format.

Besides her skill and comfort in giving a televised address, the secret to her success isn’t hard to parse. Instead of rebutting Obama, she aimed her fire—and by extension, the Republican Party’s—at its chief threat: Donald Trump.

“My story is really not much different from millions of other Americans. Immigrants have been coming to our shores for generations to live the dream that is America,” said Haley, introducing herself to American public for the first time, before going on the offensive against the Republican presidential front-runner. “Today, we live in a time of threats like few others in recent memory. During anxious times, it can be tempting to follow the siren call of the angriest voices. We must resist that temptation.”

Most coverage—and most praise—of Haley’s address focused on this passage and others that signaled a clear attack on Trump from the Republican establishment. “No one who is willing to work hard, abide by our laws, and love our traditions should ever feel unwelcome in this country,” she said.

But missing in the analysis was a detailed look at the next part of her speech, where she contrasted Trump and anti-immigration voices on the right with protest movements on the left. After voicing conservative Republican positions on border security, she pivoted to the defining event of her tenure in South Carolina—the racist killings at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.

“What happened after the tragedy is worth pausing to think about,” she said. ”Our state was struck with shock, pain, and fear. But our people would not allow hate to win. We didn’t have violence, we had vigils. We didn’t have riots, we had hugs.”

Haley continued with this: “We removed a symbol that was being used to divide us, and we found a strength that united us against a domestic terrorist and the hate that filled him.”

On the surface, this is a simple retelling of the story of last summer, where—after protests and pressure from community activists—Haley removed the Confederate battle flag from the state capitol building in Columbia (albeit, a retelling that threads the needle about what the Confederate flag actually means). At the same time, you don’t have to read closely to see it’s also a barely coded rebuke to movements like Black Lives Matter.

“We didn’t have riots, we had hugs,” for example, is a clear reference to the events in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, where police killings of unarmed black men unleashed a torrent of pent-up anger and frustration around police violence and harassment.

“Some people think that you have to be the loudest voice in the room to make a difference,” she said. “That is just not true. Often, the best thing we can do is turn down the volume. When the sound is quieter, you can actually hear what someone else is saying. And that can make a world of difference.”

This sounds pleasant enough. But underneath is something ugly: the idea that, if you face oppression or horrific violence, the only legitimate response is reflexive quiet and forgiveness. Good victims, Haley seems to say, don’t make noise. The people who do—they’re the real problem. In this formulation, traditional Republican conservatism is a moderating force, that exists between the noise of Trump and of Black Lives Matter.

This turn only holds, however, if you equate Trump—an opportunistic demagogue leading a nativist movement—with a movement whose name affirms the value of human life, and whose aim is less violence in the conduct of policing. Equating the two is sophistry….Read the rest here

 
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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in Black Conservatives, BlackLivesMatter

 

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Christmas Message Welcoming Syrian Refugees

Our neighbors to the North outdo us again.

 
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Posted by on December 24, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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Chicago Church Removes BLM Message after Death Threats to Parishoners Children

Yeah…You read that heading right, The Kluxxer conservatives threatened to kill the children in a Church in Chicago – because the Church posted a message about BLM.

Social media pressure forces Beverly church to remove Black Lives Matter message

Members of a church in Chicago’s Beverly community wanted to get folks talking about race relations when they posted a “Black Lives Matter” message on the electronic sign outside the church.

They achieved their goal, and then some.

Because of harsh negative responses — including some threats of physical harm to the church’s children — on its Facebook page, the Beverly Unitarian Church on Wednesday removed the week-old message, replacing it with a more generic one — “Life Matters, Risk Loving Everyone.”

Church Trustee Linda Cooper, a church member since 1977, said the original message “was supposed to start a conversation here, and I guess we succeeded. We were quite surprised. We did receive some positive responses on Facebook as well as some extremely nasty ones as well as some threats.”

She said the positive messages were outnumbered by those that considered “Black Lives Matter” as racist and promoting an anti-police message.

That could not be further from the truth, Cooper said. She said the church’s national association in June voted to use the slogan as a way to affirm the work of the “Black Lives Matter” movement, which draws attention to violence against blacks.

“It didn’t mean that other lives didn’t matter. It means exactly the opposite, that all lives matter,” Cooper said. “Some people framed the message as being anti-white or anti-police. That was not our message at all. So that’s unfortunate.

“It does make you wonder what’s going on, especially in a (community) like ours where people of different races live together and where we have a large number of police officers living. It’s an interesting dynamic.”

Ald. Matt O’Shea, 19th Ward, said he was appalled by the hateful comments that were posted about the church’s sign and believes most of them did not come from Beverly residents. He pointed out that the church, 10244 S. Longwood Drive, has been in Beverly for 75 years.

“They were calling attention to an issue they believe in, and it somehow got turned into a negative,” O’Shea said. “It’s unfortunate. It’s one thing to disagree with something, but when you start making threats, that’s a whole different area. I assure you the 22nd Police District is taking those threats seriously.”

He acknowledged that it may be difficult to identify those who made the threats given the anonymity provided by social media.

“Cowards,” he said, “typically raise their heads in darkness.”

After the message was removed, a posting on the church’s Facebook page reads, “We have made an effort to listen deeply to your responses and we ask all of you to step back and do the same. How would you answer this question: For too long being black has meant being less than; how do we change this in our community? We look forward to the conversation.

“If all life matters, then paying attention to those whose lives are demonstrably less valued by society becomes a necessary response. As Universalists, we believe that all life is equally precious and everyone should have the right to thrive in an environment of peace and freedom,” the posting says.

On Thursday, passers-by had mixed thoughts on the sign controversy.

Helen Pelvic, 38, of Beverly, who is white, thought the original message conveyed the notion that perhaps black lives mattered more than others.

“It shouldn’t be a color. It should be that lives matter,” she said.

Raymond Jackson, 60, is black and was not offended that the original message was removed.

“It’s not black and white. It’s about a relationship with God. God created man. He didn’t’ say anything about black or white,” Jackson said. “All lives matter. All lives.”

Brennan Machined, 29, of Beverly, who is white, said the message “specifying (race) does isolate the community but points out a distinction,” adding that he thinks the “Black Lives Matter” movement draws needed attention to a national problem.

Retired schoolteacher Peggy Salter, 65, who is black, said the message was “not about saying other lives don’t matter but (drew) attention to the fact that so many young black men and women are dying. The church is about peace and bringing the community together.”

 
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Posted by on September 11, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Obama Losing the Black Vote

The people advising President Obama are definitely OTL. While accomplishing a great deal, possibly more than any President since Johnson, in the first 20 months of his Presidency, public opinion still continues to lag about his accomplishments, and misunderstandings about what the new legislation he has driven through mean to the American people…

Still abound. They spend way to much time worrying about offending the white voters who didn’t vote for Obama last time – and wouldn’t vote for Obama if he was the second coming.

Now, it might be comfortable fo some to blame the massive disinformation campaign by Faux News and others on the right…

But I blame in on just plain old Democrat cowardice. It would seem, having a spine is anathema to the majority of elected Democrats, despite the surfacing of a few champions occasionally.

The President of the United States has one heck of a “Bully Pulpit” – the fact that he hasn’t until now utilized the full force of that is the most critical failure of his administration. No wonder that the progressive and minority base…

Just isn’t going to show up this election. This is a classic case of forgetting the folks who got you there…

Neglecting the Base

Bob Herbert

Maybe it was just a coincidence, but it was striking, nevertheless.

The mayor of Washington, Adrian Fenty, one of the so-called postracial black leaders, suffered a humiliating defeat in his bid for re-election last week when African-American voters deserted him in droves. The very same week President Obama, the most prominent of the so-called postracial types, was moving aggressively to shore up his support among black voters.

Mr. Obama, who usually goes out of his way to avoid overtly racial comments and appeals, made an impassioned plea during a fiery speech Saturday night at a black-tie event sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus. “I need everybody here,” he said, “to go back to your neighborhoods, to go back your workplaces, to go to the churches and go to the barbershops and go to the beauty shops. And tell them we’ve got more work to do.”

It’s no secret that the president is in trouble politically, and that Democrats in Congress are fighting desperately to hold on to their majorities. But much less attention has been given to the level of disenchantment among black voters, who have been hammered disproportionately by the recession and largely taken for granted by the Democratic Party. That disenchantment is likely to translate into lower turnout among blacks this fall.

The idea that we had moved into some kind of postracial era was always a ridiculous notion. Attitudes have undoubtedly changed for the better over the past half-century, and young people as a whole are less hung up on race than their elders. But race is still a very big deal in the United States, which is precisely why black leaders like Mr. Fenty and Mr. Obama try so hard to behave as though they are governing in some sort of pristine civic environment in which the very idea of race has been erased.

These allegedly postracial politicians can end up being so worried about losing the support of whites that they distance themselves from their own African-American base. This is a no-win situation — for the politicians and for the blacks who put their hopes and faith in them.

Mr. Fenty was cheered by whites for bringing in the cold-blooded Michelle Rhee as schools chancellor. She attacked D.C.’s admittedly failing school system with an unseemly ferocity and seemed to take great delight in doing it. Hundreds of teachers were fired and concerns raised by parents about Ms. Rhee’s take-no-prisoners approach were ignored. It was disrespectful.

Blacks responded last week by voting overwhelmingly for Mr. Fenty’s opponent, Vincent Gray, who is also black. This blowback undermined whatever Ms. Rhee and Mr. Fenty had hoped to achieve. Thanks to their ham-handed approach to governing and disregard of the sensibilities of their constituents, both of them will soon be gone. But the children they claimed to care so much about will still be locked in a lousy school system.

Black voters across the country are not nearly as discontented with Mr. Obama as blacks in Washington were with Mr. Fenty. But neither do they have the same enthusiasm that they had in the historic 2008 election… (more)

 
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Posted by on September 21, 2010 in Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

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