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Georgia Doctor Arrested After 36 Patients Die

This one is unbelievable in terms of carnage inflicted by a single Doctor going bad…

Feds raid alleged pill mill, link several deaths to psychiatrist

CLAYTON COUNTY, Ga. —

A Clayton County psychiatrist is behind bars, accused of running a pill mill. Authorities say dozens of patients died.

Only Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne was there as nearly 40 federal and local agents raided the offices of Dr. Narendra Nagareddy.

They later moved on to his home to seize more assets.

“He’s a psychiatrist in Jonesboro who has been overprescribing opiates and benzodiazepine and the last several years has had a multitude of overdoses and overdose deaths,” Clayton County Police Chief Mike Register told Winne.

Agents with the DEA, the Clayton County DA’s office, the Clayton County Police Department and the Georgia Department of Community Supervision converged on Nagareddy’s office armed with a search warrant and an arrest warrant for the psychiatrist Thursday morning.

“He’s charged with prescribing pain medication which is outside his profession as a psychiatrist and not for a legitimate purpose for the patient,” said Clayton County District Attorney Tracy Graham Lawson.

According to legal documents, “36 of Nagareddy’s patients have died while being prescribed controlled substances from Dr. Nagareddy, 12 of which have been confirmed by investigators through autopsy reports to have been the result of prescription drug intoxication.”

“Former and current patients have admitted to obtaining controlled substance prescriptions from Dr. Nagareddy without having a legitimate medical need,” the documents said.

Winne was there as agents took Nagareddy into custody at his home.

“Did you prescribe more than you were supposed to?” Winne asked him.

Nagareddy had no answer.

“People come to this person for help, and instead of getting help, they’re met with deadly consequences,” Register told Winne. “If the allegations are true, he is Dr. Death, no doubt about it.”

The district attorney’s office said they also filed a RICO civil action to seize Nagareddy’s assets.

“Americans are abusing prescription drugs at a truly alarming level,” said Clyde E. Shelley Jr. with the DEA. “Doctors hold a position of public trust and to betray that position cannot be tolerated.”

Well…At least we now know where the Flubberduckkie has been getting his meds, and why he is incoherent most of the time…

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2016 in News

 

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Disparate Treatment of Black Children for Pain Management

One of my recurring nightmares from a disaster zone where I was working is the sight of a small child lying on the sidewalk dead while people and workers stepped around and over the child. Makes you sick when you think medical personnel could actually do this…

Just when you thought we had left all this behind us…

White Kids Get More Pain Meds Than Black Kids in the Emergency Room

A new study found that in emergency rooms, the odds of a black child being given appropriate pain medication were one-fifth those for a white child.

Appendicitis is painful. Having been lucky enough to experience it in my late twenties myself, I can personally verify this bit of common knowledge. It hurts.

However, despite the clear association between appendicitis and pain, which can be quite severe, the management of that pain is not always consistent. A new study in the journal JAMA Pediatrics finds that there are racial disparities in the medications used to treat it for children in American emergency departments, with black patients far less likely to get more potent pain medication than white ones.

The authors of the study sought to build on previous reports that had documented disparities between white and black patients regarding pain management. They chose appendicitis as their particular focus because it more clearly warrants stronger pain medications. There are many causes of broader categories like abdominal pain, and for some of these treating with opioid medications like morphine or Demerol would be inappropriate. By selecting appendicitis, investigating the proper pain control is less ambiguous.

Using a survey of hospitals conducted annually by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the study looked at how often any pain medication was prescribed for pediatric patients diagnosed with appendicitis, and beyond that, how often opioids specifically were given. While their results showed no racial difference in how often analgesics as a whole were delivered to control patients’ pain, there was a big difference when it came to opioids.

Black patients received the stronger medications in about 20 percent of overall cases, compared to about 43 percent of white patients. When controlling for additional factors such as ethnicity, age, sex, insurance status, triage level, and pain score, black children were likely to get opioids for their pain about 12 percent of the time, compared to 34 percent for white children.

This disparity remained even when patients rated their pain as moderate, with a 60 percent likelihood for white patients to receive any pain medication at all, compared to only about 16 percent for black patients. When the pain rating was severe, black patients were likely to receive the stronger opioid class of medication about 25 percent of the time, compared to 58 percent for white ones.

In other words, three quarters of the time black children presented to emergency departments complaining of severe abdominal pain from appendicitis, if they received any pain medication at all it was likely to be a comparatively weak choice such as Tylenol. Two thirds of white patients in similar levels of pain were likely to get something like Demerol or morphine.

The results when it comes to the appropriate management of appendicitis weren’t great across the board. Overall, a little less than 60 percent of all patients surveyed received pain medication of any kind. That means a sizeable minority weren’t given anything, which is distressing in itself. As the authors note, good pain control is a benchmark of quality care, and large numbers of kids during the study period weren’t getting it.

Much of this lack may be related to providers’ mistaken belief that appropriately controlling patients’ pain can delay proper diagnosis, which could then delay necessary surgery. Location and severity of pain are among the criteria for diagnosing appendicitis, after all. However, there are numerous studies thatdebunk that misapprehension, and patients who present in pain should have that pain alleviated.

However, the racial disparity in how appendicitis pain was treated is stark in this report. The authors found that the odds of a black child being given appropriate pain medication were one fifth those for a white child. That is egregious.

 
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Posted by on September 17, 2015 in Domestic terrorism, The New Jim Crow

 

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