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WSJ Wakes Up From Conservative Opinion Page Stupor and Hammers the Trump/Chumph

Some years ago a guy named John Fund had taken the WSJ’s editorial pages into Briebart land, with the publishing of a number of racist articles by white nationalists and racists like Heather McDonald.

Good to see there are some small signs of recovery at what was at one time, before Fund and his racist trolls, the nation’s premier business publication.

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‘A humiliating coup de grace’: Right-wing WSJ editorial roasts Trump’s fight with London mayor

The Wall Street Journal’s right-wing editorial page has written another blistering editorial slamming President Donald Trump’s erratic and self-destructive behavior.

In a Tuesday op-ed, the Journal’s editors excoriated the president for sending out tweets that attacked London Mayor Sadiq Khan and that undermined his own case for his proposed travel ban.

When it comes to his fight with Khan, the Journal editors were appalled that Trump would bash the London mayor less than a day after his city suffered from a deadly terrorist attack.

“World leaders who stoop to attack municipal politicians in foreign cities look small, not that we can recall a precedent,” they wrote. “If Theresa May has an opinion about Bill de Blasio she’s kept it to herself, though the Prime Minister was compelled to say Mr. Khan is ‘doing a good job. It’s wrong to say anything else.’ In a humiliating coup de grace, the mayor’s office put out a statement saying he ‘has more important things to do than respond’ to Mr. Trump’s social-media insults.”

Pivoting to Trump’s tweets in support of his ban on travel from several Muslim majority countries, the editors wrote that Trump had undermined the case that his own lawyers at the U.S. Department of Justice had meticulously constructed to help it pass the legal muster.

In conclusion, the editors said that Trump’s continued ineptitude will only scare away intelligent and qualified people from working at the White House — and leave an administration filled with “no one but his family and the Breitbart staff.”

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Can a BLM Champion Win in Missouri?

What we are beginning to see is BLM move into the political space as a method of promoting the values and issues the organization supports. A new generation of politicians not tied to the 60’s Civil Tights establishment. Making the government accountable covers a lot more ground than just stopping Police violence. Go for it!

Tishaura O. Jones

Tishaura O. Jones, currently City Treasurer is running for Mayor of St. Louis

 

Can a Champion of Black Lives Matter Become Mayor of St. Louis?

Tishaura Jones is running to “uproot racism” just a few miles from the streets where Michael Brown was murdered.

Most political candidates would do just about anything to win the endorsement of their largest hometown newspaper, but Tishaura O. Jones knows that the old rules are rigged—and ripe for revision.

The 44-year-old city treasurer, Black Lives Matter advocate, and labor-backed progressive is running to be the next mayor of St. Louis. Last month, she declined to sit down for a standard candidate interview with the editorial board of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Instead, in a stroke of gutsy defiance, she wrote a searing open letter to the newspaper’s leadership in which she criticized its coverage of poverty and racism in the city and laid out her own bold political platform.

“I had a Fannie Lou Hamer moment,” Jones says, referring to the iconic Southern civil-rights activist. “I was sick and tired of being sick and tired.”

Specifically, as her letter lays out, she was sick and tired of the way the Post-Dispatch leadership seemed to blame poor and struggling residents for St. Louis’s woes, attributing its problems to racially coded issues like “blight” and “graffiti.” She was sick and tired of the paper’s “thinly veiled racism and preference for the status quo past.” She wanted no part of it.

“What is killing our city is poverty…,” she wrote. “What is killing our region is a systemic racism that pervades almost every public and private institution, including your newspaper, and makes it nearly impossible for either North St. Louis or the parts of South St. Louis where African Americans live to get better or safer or healthier or better-educated.”

Jones believes she can begin to change all that. And she detailed a plan to do so in her unsparing letter, which quickly went viral and helped infuse her candidacy with a last-minute boost of money and populist energy. As she enters the final days of her primary run, she hopes that energy will be enough to propel “the people’s candidate,” as she calls herself, one crucial step closer to the city’s highest office.

Jones’s campaign, set against the backdrop of the murder of Michael Brown in nearby Ferguson, is further evidence that the movements against mass incarceration, police brutality, and entrenched racism are holding the line at the local level. Should she win, her success would offer reassurance that the progressive flame can still burn hot in City Hall, despite the reactionary white-supremacist agenda ascendant at the White House.

Indeed, most grassroots progressive groups in St. Louis back Jones’s candidacy, says Kennard Williams, a community organizer with the nonprofit Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment, or MORE, which is currently leading a campaign against mass incarceration, called Decarcerate STL, in the city.

Jones’s record, her ideas and her rhetoric, he says, have earned her endorsements from organizations like MORE, the SEIU Missouri State Council, the St. Louis Action Council, and the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, as well as dozens of Black Lives Matter, civil-rights, and community activists in the city. Mobilize Missouri, a statewide coalition of grassroots activists that emerged out of the Bernie Sanders campaign, endorsed her in mid-February.

“People understand that she is the best option,” Williams adds. “She is the only candidate to come out and trash on our criminal-justice system, to acknowledge there is a problem with this system and that we can’t keep operating it this way.”

In her letter to the Post-Dispatch, for instance, Jones pledged to “look at every issue through a racial equity lens” and to advocate for people who have been “disenfranchised, red-lined and flat-out ignored for way too long.”

One sees this approach in her past work. During her innovative tenure as city treasurer, a normally staid political office, she launched a program to open college savings accounts for every kindergartner in St. Louis and seed each account with $50 drawn from parking fees. She also created an Office of Financial Empowerment, which provides free financial education and credit-counseling services.

As mayor, Jones says she would expand such programs. Her agenda, though, goes far beyond that.

She intends, for instance, to close once and for all the city’s notorious Workhouse, a jail that some activists have likened to a debtors’ prison. In her open letter, Jones described the facility as a “rat hole.” If she succeeds in shuttering it, she says she will funnel the budget savings to reentry programs, mental-health services, and substance-abuse centers.

“We have advocated shutting down the Workhouse for a couple years now,” says Williams, who helps spearhead MORE’s campaign against mass incarceration. “Her plan falls perfectly in line with what we are trying to do.”

Jones supports the placement of social workers in the city’s police department, the establishment of a $15 minimum wage, and the creation of a Tenants Bill of Rights to help protect poor and working-class renters from predatory landlords. She plans to eliminate the St. Louis cash-bail system too.

“Cash bail has a domino effect on low income families,” she says. “If someone is in jail because they can’t afford to pay a cash bail, then they may lose their jobs, and from there it becomes a downward spiral.”

If Jones’s campaign prevails, if she beats out six other Democrats in the March 7 primary as well the inevitable Republican opponent in the April 4 general election, the Black Lives Matter movement will clearly, finally, have an unequivocal ally at City Hall.

“St. Louis is the epicenter of Black Lives Matter,” says Jones. “As I wrote in my letter, after that tragic incident in Ferguson, we woke up, black people woke up, and we have seen more civic and political activity from young people than we have ever seen before. I want to make sure that we are amplifying their voices. I want to make sure we are giving them a seat at the table.”

“Uprooting racism,” she contends, “has to be the number-one priority.”

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Angry Protesters of Police Killing Chase Mayor From City Council Meeting in Texas

People are getting pissed at this shidt. Another example of an off-duty Police Officer shooting an unarmed suspect.

Protesters in a small Texas town outside Dallas who are upset over the police killing of an unarmed Latino teenager took over a City Council meeting and ended up chasing the mayor away in a police car, WFAA reports.

The protests started in Farmers Branch on Tuesday night with just a single girl holding a sign, but protesters then started rolling in via buses. The meeting ended with about 200 people chanting the name of the slain teen, Jose Cruz, and forcing Mayor Bob Phelps to adjourn the meeting.

Farmers Branch police officer Ken Johnson was arrested and charged with murder for shooting and killing Cruz, who was 16, in March. Johnson was off-duty and not in uniform. Cruz was with a friend, Edgar Rodriguez, and Johnson had accused them of breaking into his car outside his home.

Rodriguez, who was injured in the shooting, said Johnson never identified himself.

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Negative Press Spurs DC To Give 107 Year Old Woman Photo ID

Get enough people demanding answers and once in a while the politicians will respond…

ID problem resolved for 107-year-old woman who danced with Obamas

“Thank the lord!” 107-year-old Virginia McLaurin exclaimed Tuesday morning as Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser handed her a copy of a new government-issued photo ID.

Just days earlier, McLaurin revealed in an interview with The Washington Postthat after meeting and dancing with President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama in February, she had been invited to New York and Los Angeles for media interviews.

There was only one problem: McLaurin didn’t have the ID she’d need to travel by plane or train, and she didn’t have the appropriate documents to get one.

The Department of Motor Vehicles in D.C. said she would need documentation that proves her identity, such as a U.S. birth certificate, an unexpired passport or an unexpired military ID card, among other things. Now at the age of 107, McLaurin didn’t have any of the required documentation to get a D.C. photo ID. She once had one, but it was stolen awhile back, she told the Post. In order to obtain her birth certificate from South Carolina where where she was born, she discovered she would also need a government-issued photo ID.

Bowser heard about McLaurin’s ordeal and as a result, Washington, D.C. passed a new regulation on Monday that allows the city to make exceptions for elderly residents applying for a driver’s license or photo ID. Under the new regulation, D.C. officials will now have the discretion to make exceptions for federal requirements for any D.C. resident over the age of 70, whereby they can come up with other acceptable documents.

“Thank you. Thank the lord!” McLaurin said after they handed her the temporary version of the ID. She will receive the official version in the mail.

Asked how she was feeling, she said, “Great! I feel great!…I don’t feel like 107. I feel like I’m about 16.”

 

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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DeRay for Mayor!

It appears that DeRay Mckesson, one of he mainstream players in Black Lives Matter is a serious politician, with a solid platform on what he would do as Mayor of Baltimore. I think most people have been underestimating his understanding and grasp of what the job entails because of his youth. Baltimore, just like any major city, is an ugly beast to run with many conflicting interests and embedded issues. The people who are successful at big city leadership tend to be part Gandhi and part Hitler. However…

He has done his homework.

Is DeRay Mckesson for real?

When DeRay Mckesson, a 30-year-old Black Lives Matter activist, filed at the last moment for Baltimore mayor, the city’s political establishment was well justified in asking, is this guy for real? Is he going to run a legitimate campaign, or is he going to tweet a bunch and lap up the love in the national media?

Tweet a bunch, he has done, though one gets the impression that’s like saying he’s breathed a bunch in the last couple of weeks. Love in the national media? Check. Starting with a story in the New York Times and, an hour later, a beyond-fawning profile of his decision to run by a Washington Post reporter who had embedded with his proto-campaign, and then including accounts in The Atlantic, Slate, NPR, The Guardian etc., he’s been everywhere.

But he’s done something else, too, and that’s issue an extensive set of policy proposals on education, economic development, public safety, health, the environment, arts and more that at least rival — and in some cases easily surpass — those from so-called mainstream candidates in their depth and scope. They are ambitious and leave gaps in some key points, particularly in terms of how the city is going to pay for them or get lawmakers in Annapolis and Washington to support them where necessary, though Mr. Mckesson is hardly the only candidate to be guilty of that sin. But what’s surprising about the platform, given how recently Mr. Mckesson has arrived on the scene, is the depth of knowledge it displays about how things have been done in this city and how they could be done differently. His ideas aren’t always the right ones or necessarily better than those proffered by other candidates, but they’re no joke either.

Though Mr. Mckesson is running as an outsider, his proposals are in certain respects less radical than what other candidates are proposing. City Councilman Carl Stokes, for example, wants to require that all developments awarded incentives like a payment in lieu of taxes or tax increment financing include a community benefits agreement. Mr. Mckesson, by contrast, wants to encourage such agreements, not require them, while “rigorously” evaluating TIFs and PILOTs to ensure they are necessary and that their costs and benefits are clearly spelled out. He notes the limitations presented by the city-state co-appointment of city school board members, but unlike businessman David Warnock, he doesn’t call a hybrid elected/appointed board, nor full mayoral control of the schools, asstate Sen. Catherine Pugh suggests. Mr. Mckesson wants a $15 minimum wage — but on the state level, not just in the city.

As might be expected based on his activism since the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., Mr. Mckesson goes farther than other candidates in some of his ideas for police accountability. For example, he advocates eliminating the Law Enforcement Officers Bill of Rights altogether — a goal that is unnecessary and probably counter-productive, in that it could foreclose the possibility of meaningful reforms. But in other respects, he doesn’t. Like several other candidates, Mr. Mckesson advocates for beefing up Baltimore’s Civilian Police Review Board, but he does not go so far as Councilman Nick Mosby to propose making seats on it elected positions. Mr. Mckesson wants to decriminalize certain nuisance crimes like spitting and open-container violations, and to shift the war on drugs to one centered on public health principles rather than criminal justice. But he doesn’t suggest ending arrests for simple possession of marijuana, as attorney Elizabeth Embry does.

Mr. Mckesson’s plans reveal a grasp of the minutiae of city government. His ideas for using city contracting to generate more jobs for city residents rest on detailed knowledge of how City Council PresidentBernard C. “Jack” Young‘s local hiring ordinance works. He is clearly versed on the latest problems that have cropped up for Baltimore — for example, the unexpected impact of tax incentives for development on state school funding formulas — and on innovative strategies from other cities, such as an effort in San Francisco to seed college savings accounts for children….Read The Rest Here

 
 

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DeRay for Mayor!

I think the bright young leaders of the BLM Movement are about to get a lesson in politics, and intractable problems… Einstein once said – “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” I sincerely hope that if DeRay wins, the experience of there being no short term or easy solutions doesn’t end his desire to change…

 

DeRay Mckesson files to run in Baltimore mayoral race

In a surprise move, civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson jumped into the already crowded contest for Baltimore mayor Wednesday night, shaking up the Democratic field minutes before the deadline to file.

“Baltimore is a city of promise and possibility,” the Black Lives Matter member told The Baltimore Sun. “We can’t rely on traditional pathways to politics and the traditional politicians who walk those paths if we want transformational change.”

He said he planned to release a platform within a week. He said it would include a call for internal school system audits to be made public.

Mckesson was the 13th and final candidate to jump into the primary race. In deep-blue Baltimore, the Democratic primary has long determined the winner of the general election.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has declined to run for re-election. Leading candidates include former Mayor Sheila Dixon, state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh, City Councilmen Carl Stokes and Nick J. Mosby, lawyer Elizabeth Embry and businessman David L. Warnock.

Mckesson, 30, a Baltimore native and former public school administrator here and in Minnesota, is part of a team called Campaign Zero, which seeks to end police killings in America. The group wants to end “broken windows” policing, increase community oversight of police and limit use of force, among other goals.

Mckesson has gained widespread attention in the protest movement that began in Ferguson, Mo., and came to Baltimore last year to demonstrate against police brutality after the death of Freddie Gray. He has nearly 300,000 followers on Twitter.

He has met with top White House officials and presidential candidates in recent months to discuss civil rights. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called him a “social media emperor.”

In recent months, Mckesson has been living in North Baltimore.

Dixon, the front-runner in the Democratic primary, said Wednesday she had not heard of Mckesson. She noted there are less than three months to go until the election, and said she wouldn’t be distracted.

“We all want the best for Baltimore,” she said. “There are 84 days left. I’m staying focused.”

Recent polls showed Dixon leading the Democratic primary, followed by Pugh and Stokes.

Mosby, who has been doing well among younger voters, welcomed Mckesson to the race. “I welcome anyone to the race and look forward to the discussion about building a better Baltimore,” he said. “I have seen the best and the worst of Baltimore and so far I am the only candidate for mayor to offer a comprehensive plan to tackle Baltimore’s toughest challenges.”

The crowded Democratic field means a candidate could win the April 26 primary with a small fraction of the vote.

Sean Yoes, the host of the “First Edition” radio show at Morgan State University’s WEAA station, said Mckesson’s candidacy would “represent a departure from business as usual.”

But he added that Mckesson is likely not well-known among the older African-American women who have long decided Baltimore’s elections….More here

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Things That Make You go Hmmmmmm…

Washington, D.C. ABC affiliate WJLAsays one of its news cars was broken into while the crew was at a press conference where DC Mayor Muriel Bowser and police chief Cathy Lanier were talking about a Task Force designed to fight robberies.

According to ABC7 News reporter Stephen Tschida, thieves tore through the news vehicle Wednesday morning and a culprit smashed a window out of the car and stole a cache of equipment.

Tschida said the crime happened within view of where the mayor and chief were speaking, approximately 100 feet away.

 
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Posted by on January 7, 2016 in Nawwwwww!

 

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