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Fox News Removed From UK

Somebody find a toy shovel to get enough dirt to bury that pig.

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Fox News removed from UK airwaves

RIP Fox News Britain. The end has come to the conservative network in Great Britain after failing to garner viewers.

CNN reported Tuesday that Rupert Murdoch and his sons have decided to pull the network rather than to trying to continue to attract an audience. The network also caused a major problem as the Murdoch family tried to conduct a $15 billion takeover of Sky News.

“Fox News is focused on the U.S. market and designed for a U.S. audience and, accordingly, it averages only a few thousand viewers across the day in the U.K.,” 21st Century Fox said in a statement.

“We have concluded that it is not in our commercial interest to continue providing Fox News in the U.K.,” it added.

The final broadcast in the U.K. will be Tuesday at 4 p.m. local time.

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Posted by on August 29, 2017 in Faux News

 

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Young Republicans No More

Looks like the Republicans are down to the Old Farts…And bigots,

 

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What Happens When The Last Black Teacher Leaves?

Have had a few discussions over the years about the impact of integrating schools.

The US School System has been in freefall for a number of years – indeed since Raygun. How an entire political class dedicated t hatred of the Public School system and dedicated to destroying Teachers Union could do anything but fail is beyond me. We are about 17th or 18th in the world now behind almost every one of the “socialist” developed nations.

In Philadelphia, the number of black teachers fell 18.5 percent between 2001 and 2012. In Chicago, it dropped 40 percent.

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BLACK TEACHERS MATTER

America’s schools desperately need educators like Darlene Lomax. So why are we driving them away?

One spring morning this year, Darlene Lomax was driving to her father’s house in northwest Philadelphia. She took a right onto Germantown Avenue, one of the city’s oldest streets, and pulled up to Germantown High School, a stately brick-and-stone building. Empty whiskey bottles and candy cartons were piled around the benches in the school’s front yard. Posters of the mascot, a green and white bear, had browned and curled. In what was once the teachers’ parking lot, spindly weeds shot up through the concrete. Across the street, above the front door of the also-shuttered Robert Fulton Elementary School, a banner read, “Welcome, President Barack Obama, October 10, 2010.”

It had been almost three years since the Philadelphia school district closed Germantown High, and 35 years since Lomax was a student there. But the sight of the dead building, stretching over an entire city block, still pained her. She looked at her old classroom windows, tinted in greasy brown dust, and thought about Dr. Grabert, the philosophy teacher who pushed her to think critically and consider becoming the first in her family to go to college. She thought of Ms. Stoeckle, the English teacher, whose red-pen corrections and encouraging comments convinced her to enroll in a program for gifted students. Lomax remembers the predominantly black school—she had only one white and one Asian American classmate—as a rigorous place, with college preparatory honors courses and arts and sports programs. Ten years after taking Ms. Stoeckle’s class, Lomax had dropped by Germantown High to tell her that she was planning to become a teacher herself.

A historic Georgian Revival building, Germantown High opened its doors in 1915 as a vocational training ground for the industrial era, with the children of blue-collar European immigrants populating its classrooms. In the late 1950s, the district added a wing to provide capacity for the growing population of a rapidly integrating neighborhood.

By 1972, Lomax’s father, a factory worker, had saved up enough to move his family of eight from a two-bedroom apartment in one of the poorest parts of Philadelphia into a four-bedroom brick house in Germantown. Each month, Darlene and her younger sister would walk 15 blocks to the mortgage company’s gray stucco building, climb up to the second floor, and press a big envelope with money orders into the receptionist’s hand. The new house had a dining room and a living room, sparkling glass doorknobs, French doors that opened into a large sunroom, an herb garden, and a backyard with soft grass and big trees. Darlene and her father planted tomatoes and made salads with the sweet, juicy fruit every Friday, all summer long.

To the Lomax children, the fenceless backyard was ripe for exploration, and it funneled them right to the yards of their neighbors. One yard belonged to two sisters who worked as special-education teachers—the first black people Darlene had met who had college degrees. As Lomax got to know these sisters, she began to think that perhaps her philosophy teacher was right: She, too, could go to college and someday buy a house of her own with glass doorknobs and a garden. She graduated from Rosemont College in 1985, and after a stint as a social worker, she enrolled at Temple University and got her teaching credential.

On February 19, 2013, Lomax was in the weekly faculty leadership meeting at Fairhill Elementary, a 126-year-old school in a historic Puerto Rican neighborhood of Philadelphia where she served as principal. A counselor was giving his report, but Lomax couldn’t hear what he said. She just stared at her computer screen, frozen, as she read a letter from the school superintendent. She read it again and again to make sure she understood what it said.

Then, slowly, she turned to Robert Harris, Fairhill’s special-education teacher for 20 years, and his wife, the counselor and gym teacher. “They are closing our school,” she said quietly. They all broke down weeping. Then they walked to the front of the building in silence and unlocked the doors to open the school for the day.

Five miles away, as Germantown High School prepared for its 100th anniversary, its principal was digesting the same letter. In all, 24 Philadelphia schools would be closed that year. These days, when Lomax visits her father in the house with the glass doorknobs, she drives by four shuttered school buildings, each with a “Property Available for Sale” sign.

Back when Lomax was a student in Philadelphia in the 1970s, local, state, and federal governments poured extra resources into these racially isolated schools—grand, elegant buildings that might look like palaces or city halls—to compensate for a long history of segregation. And they invested in the staff inside those schools, pushing to expand the teaching workforce and bring in more black and Latino teachers with roots in the community. Teaching was an essential path into the middle class, especially for African American women; it was also a nexus of organizing. During the civil rights movement, black educators were leaders in fighting for increased opportunity, including more equitable school funding and a greater voice for communities in running schools and districts.

But today, as buildings like Germantown High stand shuttered, these changes are slowly being rolled back. In Philadelphia and across the country, scores of schools have been closed, radically restructured, or replaced by charter schools. And in the process, the face of the teaching workforce has changed. In one of the most far-reaching consequences of the past decade’s wave of education reform, the nation has lost tens of thousands of experienced black teachers and principals.

According to the Albert Shanker Institute, which is funded in part by the American Federation of Teachers, the number of black educators has declined sharply in some of the largest urban school districts in the nation. In Philadelphia, the number of black teachers declined by 18.5 percent between 2001 and 2012. In Chicago, the black teacher population dropped by nearly 40 percent. And in New Orleans, there was a 62 percent drop in the number of black teachers.

Percentage Change in Teacher Population by Race and Ethnicity, 2002-2012

Many of these departures came as part of mass layoffs and closings in schools…Read More Here

 

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Another One Bites the Dust – Republican Mayor Leaves Party Due to the Chumph

What I suspect is the beginning of an avalanche…

GOP Mayor Leaves Republican Party, In Part Because Of Donald Trump

“For the first time in my life, I cannot support the Republican nominee for president.”

After determining that he cannot support Donald Trump as his party’s presidential nominee, a Republican lawmaker has abandoned the party altogether — a sign of growing discontent within GOP ranks.

Danny Jones, the four-term mayor of Charleston, West Virginia, announced Friday that he changed his party identification to “unaffiliated.”

“For the first time in my life, I cannot support the Republican nominee for president,” Jones told the Charleston Gazette-Mail.

Jones, who has been a Republican for 45 years, said that in November he will vote for Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson for president.

In leaving the GOP, Jones also cited his opposition to the more conservative members of West Virginia’s state legislature, who have backed so-called religious freedom laws that make it legal for businesses to discriminate against LGBT individuals. The West Virginia legislation is part of a wave of similar laws nationwide.

“I’m basically a city guy, and I believe [in] live and let live and stay out of each other’s bedroom,” Jones said.

Jones is not the only GOP lawmaker fleeing his party because of Trump. Earlier this month, Iowa State Sen. David Johnson (R) became the first elected official to leave the GOP because of Trump after the real estate mogul launched racist attacks against a federal judge, sending Republican lawmakers into a tailspin.

“I will not stand silent if the party of Lincoln and the end of slavery buckles under the racial bias of a bigot,” Johnson said.

This week, disunity among Republicans escalated further as Trump’s response to the mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, gave party leaders pause. Republicans raced to condemn Trump’s rhetoric, and some who had supported his candidacy tried to distance themselves. Other Republicans still on the fence about backing Trump have raised the possibility of challenging him at the convention in July.

 
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Posted by on June 19, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Businesses Voting With Their Feet to Leave Republican States

The only thing worse than Republican Stone Age fundamentalist social hate…Is the failed Republican economic beliefs trashing their states and forever leaving them on the tail end of economic development.

Unable to locally hire educated and qualified staff, unable to get qualified people who want to move there, and burdened by hateful conservative social laws and tax cuts for the rich destroying everything from the quality of life through the ability for children to get an education companies are increasingly fleeing the red states.

‘Resign in shame’: Fed-up Kansas CEO flees GOP governor’s disastrous reign

A Tech CEO blamed Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback and his ultra-conservative policies for his decision to move his company — and its jobs — to another state.

“It’s not so much that I’m moving the company to Missouri as I’m moving it away from Kansas,” said Jeff Blackwood, CEO of Pathfinder Health Innovations.

Blackwood, whose privately held company provides software to autism therapy centers, wrote a blistering attack of Brownback and the Republican-dominated legislature — which he said had destroyed the state’s economy with failed conservative policies.

“Kansas has become a test center of ‘trickle down’ economics, espoused by economist Arthur Laffer during the Reagan years,” Blackwood wrote in a personal post on the company’s blog. “Nowhere has there been as thorough an implementation of Laffer’s policy recommendations — and nowhere has there been as dramatic a failure of government.”

The CEO blasted an unprecedented tax cut enacted in 2012, which Brownback promised would be a “shot of adrenaline” to the state’s economy, but instead has cost Kansas jobs, revenue and its bond rating.

Kansas has faced budget shortfalls in 11 of the past 12 months, and its economy shrank in three of four quarters last year.

Blackwood ripped the governor for placing the burden for his mistakes on children and the developmentally disabled with cuts to education and social services.

“You’ll hear claims from Kansas officials that funding to education is at an all time high, but it’s just an accounting trick – they chose to shuffle money for special education and retirement funds through the schools so it could appear as an increase on the books,” Blackwood said.

The Republican legislature had instead focused on freezing teacher salaries, pursuing funding cuts later ruled unconstitutional and laws calling for teachers to be imprisoned for introducing “offensive” content, Blackwood said.

He accused Brownback and his GOP “cronies” of intentionally undermining public education and diverting taxpayer funds — and students — to private and religious schools.

“In the end, I believe the goals of the Brownback administration are going exactly to plan — starve the state of resources to the point where it just makes sense to turn over critical government functions to for-profit entities,” Blackwood said.

The CEO accused Brownback of turning the state’s Medicaid program, KanCare, into a cash cow for three insurance companies — which he said forced pregnant women to wait months for care and kept health care providers from being paid for their service.

Blackwood blamed the governor’s policies for the murder of a 61-year-old man by a patient improperly released from an underfunded mental health care facility and the rape of a worker at another hospital.

“I can’t, in good conscience, continue to give our tax money to a government that actively works against the needs of its citizens; a state that is systematically targeting the citizens in most need, denying them critical care and reducing their cost of life as if they’re simply a tax burden that should be ignored,” Blackwood said.

Blackwood said his decision to move Pathfinder Health Innovations, which is adding new jobs, to Kansas City, Missouri, was a matter of conscience — and a decision he hoped other business leaders would emulate.

“I believe that it is the responsibility of business owners and people with some voice in society should speak up against these destructive policies,” Blackwood said. “And I believe it is far past the time that Sam Brownback and his cronies admit the damage they’ve caused to the people of Kansas and resign in the shame they deserve.”

 

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Paypal Leaves North Carolina Over Anti-LGBT Law

Making bigotry (and stupidity) expensive…North Carolina just lost 400 jobs.

Now if Big Blue or some of the majors will pull out…

Now – if companies are willing to do this for LBGT people…Why not in states where minorities are persecuted? I mean…There are places I wouldn’t consider working because of economic or quality of life considerations. Quality of life also means the level of racism in a city. That impacts businesses ability to recruit and retain qualified and senior staff.

PayPal pulls plug on North Carolina unit to protest anti-gay law

Two weeks after unveiling plans to open a global operations center in Charlotte, North Carolina, that would employ more than 400 people, PayPal says it will instead look elsewhere due to a new state law that blocks anti-discrimination rules for gay and transgender people.

The legislation enacted by the state “invalidates protections of the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender citizens and denies these members of our community equal rights under the law,” PayPal said in a statement on Tuesday. “Becoming an employer in North Carolina, where members of our teams will not have equal rights under the law, is simply untenable.”

The law, approved by the state’s Republican-controlled legislature and Gov. Pat McCrory, came in response to a Charlotte City Council ordinance approved in February that would have extended protections to gays and lesbians, as well as bisexual and transgender people, at hotels, restaurants and stores. Charlotte also would have allowed transgender people to use restrooms aligned with their gender identity.

The law blocked Charlotte’s rules and prevented other local governments from approving similar ordinances.

The online payments company is joining a growing list of companies that oppose the law, with Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOGL), American Airlines (AAL) and Bank of America (BAC), as well as the state’s professional basketball team, among those calling for a repeal.

Atlanta’s mayor has reportedly banned taxpayer-funded travel to North Carolina over the law, following similar actions by officials in states including New York, Connecticut, Minnesota and Washington.

 

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Georgia Passes KKK Bill – First Company Declares Intention to Leave the State

Think it is time a lot of companies vote with their feet. These folks are trying to run a business – there is no room for this shit. You get and hire the best folks – and there isn’t any room for ignorant sanctimonious right wing so-called christian morons.

Kelvin Williams, co-founder of 375K

Telecom company abandoning Georgia after sweeping anti-gay bill passes: ‘We don’t tolerate that crap’

A Telecom company will be picking up and moving out of Georgia after state lawmakers passed sweeping anti-gay legislation, the New Civil Rights Movement reports.

Decatur-based 373K announced it would be leaving via Twitter. Its founders are outraged over the poorly-named First Amendment Defense Act, which extends legal cover state-wide to individuals and corporations to discriminate against LGBT people and same-sex couples.

Legal experts told the NCRM the law is likely unconstitutional. The heavily-criticized bill was slammed by State Senator Emanuel Jones, who pointed out it would protect the KKK.

“I’m gay, our CFO is gay, we have people from every walk of life working here,” co-founder Kelvin Williams told NCRM on Saturday. “I’ve got Muslims, Buddhists, atheists here. We’ve got great Christians working for us. They’ve never thought of not serving anyone – that’s not the message of Christ.”

“We don’t tolerate that crap,” he added definitively.

373K Client Relations Manager Brian Greene told NCRM the company no longer feels comfortable paying taxes in Georgia.

373K isn’t the only firm to pull business out of a state that passed anti-gay legislation. Last year, SalesForce CEO Marc Benioff announced the cancellation of “all programs that require our customers/employees to travel to Indiana to face discrimination.” Other companies, like Nike, Apple, Fortune 500 member Cummins, Eskenazi Health, Eli Lilly and Co., and NASCAR, also condemned the law, according to NCRM.

“If you’re not a white married Christian heterosexual, prepare to be persecuted,” Williams told NCRM, adding the lawmakers passing the bigoted legislation are “fake Christians.”

 

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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