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First Member of Chumph Cartel Goes to Jail

With the profligate racism of the Chumph Cartel, I don’t imagine any of them convicted and jailed is going to do too much better than your run of the mill white wing child molester…

Image result for Alex van der Zwaan

Dutch attorney gets 30 days in first sentence for Mueller probe

Alex van der Zwaan had admitted to lying to investigators.

Special counsel Robert Mueller obtained the first sentence in his high-profile investigation Tuesday, as a Dutch attorney who admitted to lying to investigators was ordered into federal custody for 30 days.

Former Skadden Arps associate Alex van der Zwaan, 33, pleaded guilty in February to lying to FBI agents about his contacts with former Trump campaign official Rick Gates and Konstantin Kilimnik, a suspected Russian intelligence operative who worked closely with Gates and former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Lawyers for van der Zwaan had asked U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson to give him a fine and pleaded with the court to let him return to his London home by August, when his wife is due to give birth.

However, the judge said some time in jail was appropriate given his offense and the fact that he is an attorney.

“We’re not talking about a traffic ticket,” she said. “This was lying to a federal officer in the course of a criminal investigation.”

In addition to the 30-day sentence, Jackson also gave van der Zwaan a $20,000 fine and two months of probation, but she said she would permit him to reclaim his passport and leave the country as soon as his month in custody is completed. It’s not immediately clear where or in what type of facility he will serve the 30 days.

Van der Zwaan was drawn into the saga in 2012 as his law firm prepared to release a report commissioned by Manafort and Gates for Ukraine’s Justice Ministry in a bid to defend then-Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, who had jailed one of his most prominent political opponents, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko.

Manafort and Gates’ work on behalf of Yanukovych’s political party has drawn Mueller’s scrutiny. Gates has pleaded guilty to lying to investigators, and Manafort is awaiting trial.

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Chumph’s Judical Nominee Busted

In a blatant attempt at Nepotism/cronyism, the Chumph nominated a guy with only 3 years of law experience, and no judicial experience to the Federal Bench in Alabama…

It turns out that the nomination wasn’t only political payback but outright nepotism.

Yet another unqualified POS from the Chumph.

This is the reason the Chumph not only has to come down – but he has to come down in a way that invalidates every nomination and decision he has made, Nailing him for the collusion with the Russians is the best way to do that in that it would invalidate his election.

Trump judicial nominee busted after failing to disclose marriage to White House lawyer and Mueller witness

Brett J. Talley was nominated by President Donald Trump to serve in a federal judgeship in Alabama, despite never having tried a case in his life. Now it’s being revealed that the appointment might be another example of the president’s failure to “drain the swamp.”

According to the New York Times, Talley is married to Ann Donaldson, the chief of staff to the White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn. Talley also never disclosed it on documents available to members of Congress who are weighing confirmation.

Talley was required to answer whether any family members or others would be “likely to present potential conflicts of interest.” He didn’t think to mention his spouse. He also didn’t mention her during his frequent contact with the White House lawyers during his nomination process.

The American Bar Association has already labeled Talley “not qualified” in a rare denouncing of the 2007 Harvard grad’s candidacy.

“Mr. Talley served as deputy solicitor general for the state of Alabama, currently serves in the Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Policy and was recommended by Alabama’s U.S. senators,” said Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary. “He is more than qualified to serve in the federal judiciary.”

The Times notes that McGahn has been influential in the nomination of young conservatives to fill judicial appointments. Still, a White House official said Donaldson had nothing to do with the process of Talley’s nomination by the White House.

It was revealed recently Donaldson was a witness for special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether Trump obstructed justice in the firing of former FBI director James Comey. She reportedly kept detailed notes about her conversations with McGhan during the time the decision was made to fire Comey, according to two sources briefed on the matter.

Talley was passed out of the Judicial Committee on a party-line vote and is expected to come up for a full vote in the U.S. Senate this week.

 

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How Bad is it? Even The Chumph’s Lawyer has Hired a Lawyer!

Damn! Even the Chumph’s Lawyer had had to hire a lawyer!

And that doesn’t mention VP Mike Pence hiring a law firm – personally.

If the Putin’s Bitch Russia collusion is “Fake news”…

Why are all these guys lawyering up?

Image result for trump in orange jumpsuit

Donald Trump’s Personal Lawyer Has Lawyered Up Amid Russia Probe

Vice President Mike Pence and campaign adviser Michael Caputo have also hired outside legal counsel.

President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer has hired his own legal representation to help him during the ongoing investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia, NBC News’ Katy Tur first reported.

Michael Cohen, who has served as Trump’s personal attorney for years, confirmed to The Washington Post that he has retained former assistant U.S. attorney Stephen M. Ryan. Ryan currently works for the Washington-based firm McDermott, Will & Emery.

Exclusive: Trump personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has hired his own counsel: Stephen Ryan, of McDermott, Will & Emery.- source w knowledge

Other Trump associates ― notably, Michael Caputo, the senior communications adviser on Trump’s campaign, and Vice President Mike Pence ― have also hired outside legal counsel to assist them during the investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller. Pence called the move “very routine.”

Caputo has hired Dennis Vacco as counsel. House Intel is trying to schedule him for mid-July. Source says Caputo wants open hearing.

Cohen is slated to testify in front of the House Intelligence Committee on Sept. 5, according to Tur, noting that the delay reportedly stems from “scheduling and logistics.”

 

 

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Even Trumps Lawyer Supports Hillary

Trump’s lawyers know a scumbag when they see one…

Trump’s lead lawyer donated to Clinton after joining case

Daniel Petrocelli’s support for Clinton undermines Trump’s widespread claims of bias in the Trump University case.

In the middle of the firestorm over Donald Trump’s racially based attacks on the judge overseeing the Trump University lawsuits, the billionaire GOP nominee went on Sean Hannity to rant against the plaintiffs’ law firm for paying Hillary Clinton large sums of money for speeches.

“The law firm gave hundreds of thousands — I think it was $900,000 or $700,000 — in speaking fees to the Clintons,” Trump said on Tuesday. “Plus, they contributed tremendous amounts of money to the campaign.”

“The whole thing is disgusting,” Trump added.

But Trump’s lead lawyer in the case has Clinton ties of his own.

Federal filings show that Daniel Petrocelli has donated to Clinton over the years, and even contributed $2,700 to her campaign after Trump brought him on to the politically fraught case.

The fact that Trump’s own lawyer in the class-action cases has been an avid Clinton backer undermines his accusations of bias in the case, not only against the plaintiffs’ lawyers but also against U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who Trump says has an “inherent conflict of interest” because of his Mexican heritage.

Records with the Federal Election Commission show that Petrocelli has donated to several Democrats over the course of more than 15 years, including California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore and, in February of 2016, to a joint fundraising committee supporting Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet.

 

 
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Posted by on June 9, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Alan Page – Purple People Eater, Lawyer, Judge

If you have ever heard the stereotype about football players being mostly brawn and few brains…Think on this. Alan Paige was part of the most feared defensive front line in football during the 80’s. As Defensive End, Paige’s quickness gave offensive lines fits. I saw a game in the mid 70’s where after some trash talk by opposing players after a holding penalty, Paige went on to sack the Oakland Raider’s quarterback, Ken Stabler 3 times in a row on successive downs.

Paige also was, from the beginning committed to improving the community though education.

Justice Alan Paige, with some of the Black Americana collection at home.

Twice Retired, Ex-Purple People Eater Is Still Passionate About Goals

JUSTICE ALAN PAGE has retired twice.

Elected to the Minnesota State Supreme Court in 1992, Justice Page stepped down from the court last summer, having reached its compulsory retirement age of 70. The first African-American on the court, Justice Page is well known in Minnesota legal circles for his carefully crafted opinions (occasionally livened with quotes from Dr. Seuss), his concern for civil rights and, more lightheartedly, for his colorful bow ties.

“I witnessed him focusing on getting the law right,” said his former Supreme Court colleague, Justice Paul Anderson (also retired). “He was very focused on equity and the elimination of discrimination.”

Justice Page doesn’t ring a bell? You might know him better from his previous career as a professional football player for 15 years, mostly with the Minnesota Vikings and, toward the end, with the Chicago Bears. A graduate of Notre Dame, Mr. Page was a remarkably quick defensive tackle, the most feared of the Vikings’ legendary front four, the Purple People Eaters.

He made six All-N.F.L. selections, and nine straight Pro Bowls. He retired from football in 1981. Seven years later he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

In person, Mr. Page is considerate and thoughtful, reflecting carefully before answering a question. At age 70 he still moves with the grace of an athlete.

But having reached pinnacles of success in two very different careers, surely it must be time to kick back, maybe hit the golf course and the nostalgia circuit? Hardly.

“Once I left the court, that experience was behind me and I am trying to figure out the new thing,” he says. “I have the sense that I want to do something with educating young children.” (Later, he added that golf is a “good walk spoiled,” and rather than look back, he prefers “looking forward.”)

Mr. Page has visited a lot of classrooms, observing that in the early years of elementary school all children are curious, eyes bright and lively. Yet for some the lights have dimmed by the time they reach the fifth, sixth and seventh grades, especially among young people from deprived backgrounds.

“My thinking is if you can get these young people thinking critically early on — first, second, third grade — things will change dramatically in terms of educational achievement,” he said. “Maybe I am naïve, but I don’t think it is mission impossible.”

Mr. Page is unusually accomplished, but he is far from alone in searching for another meaningful act at his stage of life. The word “retirement” still suggests that it’s time to stop working and embrace leisure full time. That’s not the case for growing numbers of aging Americans. They want to stay engaged in the broader society and economy, continuing to be useful by tapping into their accumulated skills and experience.

“He has always been committed since he was quite young to really make a difference in society and to create and leave a legacy,” said Mr. Page’s wife, Diane. She also “retired” after a career of four-plus decades as a marketing research consultant. Retired isn’t the right word for her, either.

The power of education to make a positive difference is one of Mr. Page’s core beliefs. Even in his 1988 talk at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, he focused on the transformative value of education, highlighting in particular the need for investing in black teenagers, “the most unemployed and undervalued people in our society.”

Looking ahead to new challenges and not back on old glories, Mr. Page asked the audience: “What contribution can I still make that would be truly worthy of the outpouring of warmth and good feelings I have received today? And the answer, for me, is clear: to help give other children the chance to achieve their dreams.”…Read The Rest Here

 
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Posted by on April 2, 2016 in Giant Negros

 

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Chicago – Judge Finds Prosecutor Hid Evidence in Police Murder

The possibility of real justice in Chicago…

Judge finds city lawyer hid evidence in Chicago police shooting, orders new trial

Chicago police officer Gildardo Sierra, left, and Darius Pinex.

A top city attorney intentionally concealed crucial evidence in a civil trial over a fatalChicago police shooting and then lied about his reasons for doing so, a federal judge ruled Monday in a scathing opinion.

In overturning the jury’s verdict and ordering a new trial, U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang imposed sanctions against the city and Senior Corporation Counsel Jordan Marsh, ordering that they pay attorney’s fees to the plaintiffs that likely will amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars even before a retrial could take place.

“Attorneys who might be tempted to bury late-surfacing information need to know that, if discovered, any verdict they win will be forfeit and their clients will pay the price,” Chang wrote in his 72-page opinion. “They need to know it is not worth it.”

Chang faulted lax training and oversight at the city’s Law Department for hampering the production of records from the Chicago Police Department and other city agencies when officers are accused of misconduct.

Steve Greenberg, an attorney who represents the family of the man who was killed, said the ruling raises questions about the Law Department’s role in perpetuating a code-of-silence police culture in which officers believe they can act with impunity. If the city’s attorneys appear willing to cover up wrongdoing, the officers will feel empowered to behave in any manner they deem fit, he said.

“There’s just a total disregard for the truth, and it runs to the highest levels,” Greenberg said. “There is a culture to cover up and win at all costs.”

A Law Department spokesman had no immediate comment Monday. Thomas Leinenweber, an attorney who represents Marsh, did not immediately respond to an email or phone call seeking comment.

The embarrassing setback for the city comes amid continuing fallout over the unrelated police shooting of 17-year-oldLaquan McDonald in October 2014. The scandal that erupted in November after video was released showing Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting McDonald 16 times prompted the U.S. Justice Department to launch a wide-ranging civil rights investigation into the use of force by Chicago police.

Chang’s ruling reverses a decision last April in which a federal jury found in favor of Officers Raoul Mosqueda and Gildardo Sierra, concluding they were justified in killing Darius Pinex during a January 2011 traffic stop on Chicago’s South Side. Both officers testified at the trial that they had pulled Pinex’s Oldsmobile over because it matched a description they had heard over their police radios of a car wanted in an earlier shooting.

In a front-page story in September, the Tribune detailed how the officers’ account of what precipitated their encounter with Pinex had begun to unravel in the midst of the trial.

According to court records, Sierra and Mosqueda did not hear the dispatch as they originally claimed because it aired over a different radio zone. It wasn’t until the middle of the trial that Marsh admitted — outside the presence of the jury — that he had failed to turn over a recording of the dispatch that actually went out over the officers’ Zone 6 radios that night, a call that talked about a different Oldsmobile Aurora that didn’t match Pinex’s car and was not wanted in connection with a shooting.

Marsh first said he had learned about the recording that day, then later said he had actually found out about it the week before trial. When the judge pressed Marsh on why he hadn’t disclosed the existence of the recording as soon as he learned of it from a police sergeant, the lawyer backpedaled more, saying it hadn’t crossed his mind that it would be something that might be helpful to the plaintiffs.

“My thought process was, I want to see what is on that (recording),” he said. “You know in retrospect I think I should have, but I wanted to talk to the sergeant and to see whether it was even relevant.”

In his ruling, Chang said Marsh, a seasoned attorney who for years has defended police accused of wrongdoing, “intentionally concealed” the existence of the emergency dispatch and then misled the court about his thought process for withholding it.

“After hiding the information, despite there being numerous times when the circumstances dictated he say something about it, Marsh said nothing, and even made misleading statements to the court when the issue arose,” Chang wrote. “… That an experienced lawyer like Marsh did not even consider the possibility that this evidence might not go his way is unlikely to the extreme.”

The judge also found that Marsh’s co-counsel, city attorney Thomas Aumann, had failed to make a reasonable effort to find the dispatch recording during the initial discovery process. In sanctioning the city for Aumann’s actions, Chang said the Law Department’s practices put its attorneys “at risk” for violating discovery rules because of a lack of training on how to request and collect documents and evidence.

Chang said the city’s attorneys showed a lack of understanding about what evidence is preserved by police and how to ask for it — including detectives’ reports, emergency recordings, computer logs and inventories from arrests.

The judge said that with tight budgets and overworked staff, he understands city lawyers “have a tough job” in responding to discovery requests involving a Police Department that preserves such a massive quantity of records. But that’s all the more reason to instill procedures to minimize mistakes, he said.

“Failing to do so will cost even more in the long run, not just in dollars,” the judge wrote.

 

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Cain Accusers Want to Talk!

Apparently, Cain’s characterization of the women who filed claims against him as President of the National Restaurant Association for sexual harassment…

Has pissed off one of them.

Now the REAL problem with this type of thing, is where there is one – there are very likely a whole bunch more…

 

Lawyer: Cain accuser wants to tell her side of story

One of the women who accused GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain of sexual harassment wants to tell her side of the story but is barred by a confidentiality agreement, her attorney in Washington said Tuesday.

Lawyer Joel P. Bennett called on the National Restaurant Association, where the woman and Cain worked in the late 1990s, to release the woman from her written promise not to talk about the allegations or disparage the trade group.

“It is just frustrating that Herman Cain is going around bad-mouthing the two complainants, and my client is blocked by a confidentiality agreement,” Bennett said. “The National Restaurant Association ought to release them and allow them to respond. ”

The association, which Cain headed from 1996 to 1999, has remained mum since the story broke in Politico on Sunday evening, citing a long-standing policy not to comment on personnel issues. Cain denied the sexual harassment allegations, saying they were “totally baseless and totally false.”

Bennett represents one of the two women, who attended an Ivy League school and now works for the federal government. She has avoided the limelight since the allegations were aired, and she is staying with relatives while the media stakes out her home in suburban Maryland, Bennett said.

If she is released from the confidentiality ban, “then it is whole new ballgame,” Bennett said.

“If we didn’t have a written settlement agreement that says confidential and no disparagement, I think she’d be very comfortable coming forward,” the attorney told The Post on Tuesday. “Not because she would be so hellbent on doing something to Herman Cain — I don’t know that.

“For all practical purposes, Herman Cain has already done that” — waived confidentiality, Bennett said. “But legally that might not constitute a waiver.”

Because the case is more than a dozen years old, Bennett said he no longer has the file nor the confidentiality agreement. He said his client is sending it to him for review to determine how she might speak publicly.

Bennett, who has practiced employment law for four decades since graduating from Georgetown University, said that he disagrees with Cain’s statements that the settlement agreement with his client was only for severance.

“If there hadn’t been [sexual harassment] claims, there wouldn’t have been a settlement,” Bennett said…

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2011 in Black Conservatives

 

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