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Angry Protesters of Police Killing Chase Mayor From City Council Meeting in Texas

People are getting pissed at this shidt. Another example of an off-duty Police Officer shooting an unarmed suspect.

Protesters in a small Texas town outside Dallas who are upset over the police killing of an unarmed Latino teenager took over a City Council meeting and ended up chasing the mayor away in a police car, WFAA reports.

The protests started in Farmers Branch on Tuesday night with just a single girl holding a sign, but protesters then started rolling in via buses. The meeting ended with about 200 people chanting the name of the slain teen, Jose Cruz, and forcing Mayor Bob Phelps to adjourn the meeting.

Farmers Branch police officer Ken Johnson was arrested and charged with murder for shooting and killing Cruz, who was 16, in March. Johnson was off-duty and not in uniform. Cruz was with a friend, Edgar Rodriguez, and Johnson had accused them of breaking into his car outside his home.

Rodriguez, who was injured in the shooting, said Johnson never identified himself.

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Stand and Murder Law, Again in South Carolina

Guy was doing a Hannibal Lecter routine…

And gets out on bail!

I guess it was OK in SC, because one of the men was brown.

SC man who shot and ’slow-cooked’ two men out on bail thanks to ‘stand your ground’ law

James Edward Loftis --  mugshotUsing the “stand your ground” defense, a Goose Creek man was granted bail on Monday in the shooting death of two men whose bodies he burned after he killed them, the Post Courier is reporting.

James Edward Loftis, 39, is facing murder charges in the deaths of taxi driver Guma Oz Dubar, 46, and his friend James Cody Newland, 32, on March 5 after they demanded he pay his fare following a ride home from a strip club.

While Loftis has given police varying accounts of what happened that evening — once saying he invited the men in, while another time saying they barged into his home —  several facts are not in dispute.

Loftis admitted that he shot both men before dragging their bodies outside his house, where he placed them in a shallow grave and set them on fire along with his bloody clothes before burying them.

“They were essentially just slow-cooked inside the grave site,” Deputy Solicitor Bryan Alfaro said during the bail hearing.

Conceding that what Loftis did was “heinous,” his attorney defended his client saying he was within his rights to defend himself in his own home under the state’s “stand your ground” laws.

“He’s a human being,” Stephen Harris said. “He freaked out and thought he was going to prison, so he tried to hide the bodies. Nobody knows how you’re going to react when you kill two people.”

Circuit Judge Markley Dennis agreed to allow Loftis to post $250,000 bail, saying his choice of the defense makes him less of a flight risk.

“The only way he will ever be able to resolve that is to … have his day in court,” Dennis explained.

The S.C. Protection of Persons and Property Act — also known as the “stand your ground” law — gives homeowners the right in many circumstances to use deadly force against people breaking into their houses.

 
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Posted by on May 10, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Jamar Clark Killers …No Charges

Forensic evidence backs the Officer’s story

Minneapolis Officers in Jamar Clark Shooting Will Not Face Charges

Two Minneapolis police officers will not face state criminal charges in the fatal shooting of Jamar Clark, an unarmed black man, the prosecutor in Hennepin County said Wednesday. The announcement upset activists who had called for the officers to be prosecuted, and provided new details about the events leading up to the shooting.

Mr. Clark’s death prompted weeks of heated, sometimes tense demonstrations, and raised broad questions about racial disparities in Minnesota. Protests started almost immediately after Mr. Clark, 24, was shot on Nov. 15 as officers responded to a report of an assault.

The police said at the time that Mr. Clark was a suspect in the assault and that he had tried to interfere with paramedics treating the woman who was hurt. Some neighbors who say they witnessed the incident claim Mr. Clark was handcuffed when he was shot, contradicting the police account.

In announcing his decision, Mike Freeman, the Hennepin County attorney, said that witnesses had given conflicting accounts about the handcuffs. The evidence, he said, suggested that Mr. Clark had tried to gain control over one officer’s gun and that he had not been handcuffed when shot.

“Forensic evidence and video evidence both support the belief that Clark was not handcuffed at any time through the altercation,” said Mr. Freeman, whose office posted a trove of investigative documents online….

After the shooting in November, which was investigated by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, activists occupied an area outside a police precinct for more than two weeks, sometimes clashing with officers. On one night, a group of outsiders came to the precinct, police said, andshot five people during a protest.

 
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Posted by on March 30, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Black Officer Charged in Dallas Shooting in 3 Days

Wow! It seems the Officers of the Law can be held accountable…If they are black or Asian.

Only took 3 days for the DA to file charges!

Why does this take so long in other places?

Farmers Branch officer charged with murder in off-duty shooting of Dallas teen

Officer Ken Johnson

In a move rarely seen in shootings involving police, an off-duty Farmers Branch officer has been charged with murder three days after fatally shooting a teenager and wounding another.

Officer Ken Johnson, 35, was arrested Wednesday night in the death of Jose Cruz, the Dallas 16-year-old who was shot after an “altercation” Sunday evening in Addison.

Johnson was also charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon in the shooting of Cruz’s classmate, Edgar Rodriguez, who is expected to survive.

“We had probable cause to make the arrest this evening,” Addison Police Chief Paul Spencer said in a written statement. “But this is a rapidly evolving situation, and it remains an active investigation.”

Johnson used a semi-automatic pistol to shoot Cruz and Rodriguez, according to an affidavit obtained by WFAA (Channel 8). Officers who were dispatched to the 14300 block of Marsh Lane found Johnson standing in the roadway, the affidavit states.

“It was further determined that Cruz’s death was caused by being intentionally shot by Johnson with a firearm,” the affidavit states.

Dallas County judges, however, sealed many of the warrants that were issued related to the case — including Johnson’s arrest warrants and multiple search warrants.

Cruz’s Dodge Challenger, Johnson’s Chevrolet Tahoe and data recorders from both vehicles were some of the items seized, court records say.

Authorities also obtained search warrants Wednesday — also sealed — for video from a business located near the shooting. It is unclear whether the video shows Johnson shooting the teens.

Spencer, the Addison police chief, said Wednesday that he expects several more weeks of investigation. An internal affairs inquiry by the Farmers Branch Police Department is ongoing.

Johnson’s attorney, Chris Livingston, questioned why the charges were filed without the case being presented to a grand jury. It “can only be explained by the fact that my client is a black police officer.”…Read The Rest Here...

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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Naked, Unarmed Black Teen Shot and Killed By Austin Texas Police

Here we go again. How is a slight, unarmed teenager with what would seem to be an obvious mental condition a danger to a Police Officer?

The victim, David Joseph

Austin police: Teen shot by officer identified as David Joseph, 17

12:45 p.m. update: Austin police identified the person shot and killed by an officer on Monday in Northeast Austin as David Joseph, 17.

Police also identified the officer involved in the shooting as Geoffrey Freeman, a veteran officer who joined the force in 2005.

“All of our officer-involved shootings are tragedies,” Austin police Chief of Staff Brian Manley said.

Concurrent investigations are underway, Manley said, including a criminal investigation being conducted by the Special Investigations Unit and the district attorney’s office.

Manley confirmed that Joseph was unarmed when he was shot Monday morning.

Police had responded to a call in the 300 block of Yager Lane that a man was chasing someone through an apartment complex, Manley said. Officer Freeman had been talking to witnesses when he responded to a call nearby in the 12000 block of Natures Bend, he said. There, Freeman encountered Joseph and within seconds of the confrontation, he opened fire, Manley said.

Freeman provided an initial statement at the scene but is expected to provide a more lengthy statement for investigators later this week, Manley said.

Manley declined to talk about whether the victim had any previous police record or a history of mental illnesss.

“Now is not the day,” he said.

Earlier: A man fatally shot Monday by an Austin police sergeant was not armed at the time of the incident, three sources told the American-Statesman and KVUE-TV today.

Officials had said at the scene that they did not know whether the man, who was naked at the time, had a weapon when he was shot in North Austin.

However, the sources, who were not authorized to speak because of the ongoing investigation, said investigators have since confirmed the unidentified man did not have a weapon.

The revelation intensified questions about the officer’s decision to shoot. Austin police have called a noon news conference at Austin police headquarters to discuss the shooting.

The sources said a key issue in the case likely will be the distance between the officer and the man and whether or not the officer can demonstrate that he was in immediate danger.

Most officers in the department also carry stun guns.

The shooting happened about 10:30 a.m. Monday in the 12000 block of Natures Bend in a small neighborhood south of Tech Ridge Boulevard near Yager Lane. Several residents had called police and said that a man was running around the neighborhood and acting erratically.

Both the suspect and officer in the incident are black. Nelson Linder, president of the Austin NAACP, said the incident highlights the need for police to review how they handle similar situations in the future.

“Once again it is very clear that this policy of response to resistance is not being enforced,” Linder said. “They need to rethink this whole approach, especially if there might be mental illness issues.”

Meanwhile, Jim Harrington, the longtime director and founder of the Texas Civil Rights Project who is retiring, condemned the incident in a statement Tuesday.

“It is almost incomprehensible that a young naked man would be considered dangerous such that a police officer would kill him,” he said. The social advocacy group has called for “a full, fair, and open investigation” of the shooting.

“This is the pattern that led to the U.S. Department of Justice investigation a few years back, and it appears that the pattern of police shootings continues,” Harrington said. “We intend to pursue this matter with the Department of Justice once more.”

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Chicago – Judge Finds Prosecutor Hid Evidence in Police Murder

The possibility of real justice in Chicago…

Judge finds city lawyer hid evidence in Chicago police shooting, orders new trial

Chicago police officer Gildardo Sierra, left, and Darius Pinex.

A top city attorney intentionally concealed crucial evidence in a civil trial over a fatalChicago police shooting and then lied about his reasons for doing so, a federal judge ruled Monday in a scathing opinion.

In overturning the jury’s verdict and ordering a new trial, U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang imposed sanctions against the city and Senior Corporation Counsel Jordan Marsh, ordering that they pay attorney’s fees to the plaintiffs that likely will amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars even before a retrial could take place.

“Attorneys who might be tempted to bury late-surfacing information need to know that, if discovered, any verdict they win will be forfeit and their clients will pay the price,” Chang wrote in his 72-page opinion. “They need to know it is not worth it.”

Chang faulted lax training and oversight at the city’s Law Department for hampering the production of records from the Chicago Police Department and other city agencies when officers are accused of misconduct.

Steve Greenberg, an attorney who represents the family of the man who was killed, said the ruling raises questions about the Law Department’s role in perpetuating a code-of-silence police culture in which officers believe they can act with impunity. If the city’s attorneys appear willing to cover up wrongdoing, the officers will feel empowered to behave in any manner they deem fit, he said.

“There’s just a total disregard for the truth, and it runs to the highest levels,” Greenberg said. “There is a culture to cover up and win at all costs.”

A Law Department spokesman had no immediate comment Monday. Thomas Leinenweber, an attorney who represents Marsh, did not immediately respond to an email or phone call seeking comment.

The embarrassing setback for the city comes amid continuing fallout over the unrelated police shooting of 17-year-oldLaquan McDonald in October 2014. The scandal that erupted in November after video was released showing Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting McDonald 16 times prompted the U.S. Justice Department to launch a wide-ranging civil rights investigation into the use of force by Chicago police.

Chang’s ruling reverses a decision last April in which a federal jury found in favor of Officers Raoul Mosqueda and Gildardo Sierra, concluding they were justified in killing Darius Pinex during a January 2011 traffic stop on Chicago’s South Side. Both officers testified at the trial that they had pulled Pinex’s Oldsmobile over because it matched a description they had heard over their police radios of a car wanted in an earlier shooting.

In a front-page story in September, the Tribune detailed how the officers’ account of what precipitated their encounter with Pinex had begun to unravel in the midst of the trial.

According to court records, Sierra and Mosqueda did not hear the dispatch as they originally claimed because it aired over a different radio zone. It wasn’t until the middle of the trial that Marsh admitted — outside the presence of the jury — that he had failed to turn over a recording of the dispatch that actually went out over the officers’ Zone 6 radios that night, a call that talked about a different Oldsmobile Aurora that didn’t match Pinex’s car and was not wanted in connection with a shooting.

Marsh first said he had learned about the recording that day, then later said he had actually found out about it the week before trial. When the judge pressed Marsh on why he hadn’t disclosed the existence of the recording as soon as he learned of it from a police sergeant, the lawyer backpedaled more, saying it hadn’t crossed his mind that it would be something that might be helpful to the plaintiffs.

“My thought process was, I want to see what is on that (recording),” he said. “You know in retrospect I think I should have, but I wanted to talk to the sergeant and to see whether it was even relevant.”

In his ruling, Chang said Marsh, a seasoned attorney who for years has defended police accused of wrongdoing, “intentionally concealed” the existence of the emergency dispatch and then misled the court about his thought process for withholding it.

“After hiding the information, despite there being numerous times when the circumstances dictated he say something about it, Marsh said nothing, and even made misleading statements to the court when the issue arose,” Chang wrote. “… That an experienced lawyer like Marsh did not even consider the possibility that this evidence might not go his way is unlikely to the extreme.”

The judge also found that Marsh’s co-counsel, city attorney Thomas Aumann, had failed to make a reasonable effort to find the dispatch recording during the initial discovery process. In sanctioning the city for Aumann’s actions, Chang said the Law Department’s practices put its attorneys “at risk” for violating discovery rules because of a lack of training on how to request and collect documents and evidence.

Chang said the city’s attorneys showed a lack of understanding about what evidence is preserved by police and how to ask for it — including detectives’ reports, emergency recordings, computer logs and inventories from arrests.

The judge said that with tight budgets and overworked staff, he understands city lawyers “have a tough job” in responding to discovery requests involving a Police Department that preserves such a massive quantity of records. But that’s all the more reason to instill procedures to minimize mistakes, he said.

“Failing to do so will cost even more in the long run, not just in dollars,” the judge wrote.

 

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Police Shootings Bear No Relationship to Crime Levels

One of the arguments which starts to fall apart quickly is that Police lethal violence is related to high crime levels. This chart from the DOJ shows there is no relationship in Police violence to violent crime levels…

 

16 Numbers That Explain Why Police Reform Became An Even Bigger Story In 2015

$248.7 million

The amount paid out last year by the 10 largest U.S. cities for settlements and court judgments involving police misconduct cases in their departments,according to a Wall Street Journal report. These cities paid out more than $1 billion over five years, with the annual total increasing nearly 50 percent from 2010 to 2014.

Taxpayers in these cities are typically on the hook for these payments, meaning that they can end up getting victimized twice — both as the direct casualties of police misconduct and the unwilling enablers who must eventually pay for that misconduct.

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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