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Uncle Jason Riley…Fueling White Racists

This on is two articles. A piece by Uncle Jason Tomming for the man about Black History Month, and a white racist defending racist statements because she got them for Jason Riley…SHowing just how black Uncle Tom’s like Riley enable white racists.

This from the Lawn Jockey himself. Here Riley argues that Jim Crow was good for black people, and if they knew their places they would be better off.

An Alternative Black History Month

History Month, which began as Negro History Week some 90 Februarys ago, was meant to be temporary. Its founder, historian Carter G. Woodson, envisioned a time when black history would be incorporated with American history and no longer require separate recognition. Woodson’s optimism was warranted.

Americans today are led by a black president in the fourth year of his second term. Martin Luther King’s birthday is a national holiday. The likeness of Harriet Tubman or Rosa Parks might soon grace U.S. currency, if the majority of people surveyed prevails. And it has been decades since school curricula excluded black perspectives and accomplishments. Black History Month’s sunset might seem long overdue, but the celebration is too useful politically for that to happen anytime soon.

Woodson died in 1950, a few years before the civil-rights movement found its stride. In the post-1960s era, black leaders turned that movement into a lucrative industry, and Black History Month helps keep them relevant. February is not simply about highlighting the achievements of people like voting-rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer or the Buffalo Soldiers who served in the Spanish-American War.

It is also about using racial identity to advance groupthink and to discourage black individuality. It is about presenting the history of blacks as the history of their victimization by whites up to the present day—which explains racial disparities in areas ranging from school achievement and household income to rates of unemployment, incarceration and single-parent homes.

The irony is that black history in the first half of the 20th century is a history of tremendous progress despite overwhelming odds. During a period of legal discrimination and violent hostility to their advancement, blacks managed to make unprecedented gains that have never been repeated. Black poverty fell to 47% from 87% between 1940 and 1960—before the implementation of Great Society programs that receive so much credit for poverty reduction. The percentage of black white-collar workers quadrupled between 1940 and 1970—before the implementation of affirmative-action policies that supposedly produced today’s black middle class.

In New York City, the earnings of black workers tripled between 1940 and 1950, and over the next decade the city saw a 55% increase in the number of black lawyers, a 56% increase in the number of black doctors and a 125% increase in the number of black teachers, according to political scientist Michael Javen Fortner’s new book, “Black Silent Majority.” The number of black nurses, accountants and engineers grew at an even faster clip over the same period. “There are signs that the Negro has begun to develop a large, strong middle class,” wrote Time magazine in 1953.

You don’t hear much about this black history during Black History Month (or any other month, for that matter) because it undercuts the dominant narrative pushed by the political left and accepted uncritically by the media. The Rev. Al Sharpton and the NAACP have no use for empirical evidence of significant black socioeconomic gains during the Jim Crow era, because they have spent decades insisting that blacks can’t advance until racism has been eliminated. If racism is no longer a significant barrier to black upward mobility and doesn’t explain today’s racial disparities, then blacks may have no use for Mr. Sharpton and the NAACP. The main priority of civil-rights leaders today is self-preservation.

Many factors could plausibly explain black progress in the first part of the 20th century. The post-World War II economy was booming, and blacks were steadily increasing their years of education, which increased their levels of compensation. Mass migration from the South meant that more blacks had access to the higher-paying jobs in the North.

The black family was also more stable during this period. Every census from 1890 to 1940 shows the black marriage rate slightly higher than the white rate. In 1925 five out of six black children in New York City lived with both parents. Nationally, two out of three black children were being raised in two-parent homes as recently as the early 1960s. Today, more than 70% are not.

Black nuclear families used to be the norm. Now they are the exception. Jim Crow did less damage to the black family than well-intentioned Great Society programs that discouraged work and marriage and promised more government checks for having more children. But that black history is also kept largely under wraps by those who have a vested interest in blaming the decimation of the black family on slavery and discrimination.

Much of what ought to be studied, duplicated and celebrated in black history is often played down or willfully ignored. And so long as the media allow civil-rights activists and liberal politicians with their own agendas to speak for all blacks, that won’t change.

Now – the white racist School Board member…

School board member kicks off Black History Month by telling blacks they are ‘their own worst enemy’

Illinois school board member is under fire for kicking off Black History Month by posting a racist message on the board’s official Facebook page, the Daily Herald reports.

Elgin Area School District U-46 board member Jeanette Ward, wrote the post on Feb. 1 that began with the line: “Blacks have become their own worst enemy, and liberal leaders do not help matters by blaming self-inflicted wounds on whites or ‘society.’”

Ward was quoting from author Jason L. Riley’s book “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed.”

Ward’s post continued, “The notion that racism is holding back blacks as a group, or that better black outcomes cannot be expected until racism has been vanquished, is a dodge. And encouraging blacks to look to politicians to solve their problems does them a disservice.”

At a Monday night board meeting, speakers tore into Ward’s post, calling it “racist speech” and labeling it as “irresponsible,” particularly on the first day of  Black History Month.

“When we honor Black History Month, we ought to know what black history is all about,” stated Myrna Becker before adding that she was appalled by what she read.

According to Ward, who is white,  she felt she was offering different perspective on Black History Month.

Danise Habun, a member of the Elgin Human Relations Commission, disagreed.

“There was nothing respectful toward or celebratory of Black History Month contained in the passage posted by Ms. Ward,” Habun said. “If her words and the quoted passage from the book is indeed to offer a fresh perspective, it appears as if there has been a failure to communicate. It continues to blame the victim, and ignores institutionalized racism. As an official elected to represent all members of the U-46 school district, Ms. Ward is to be held to a high standard of behavior and conduct.”

Ward refused to back down following the public comments, but did state that the entire board should not be held accountable for what she wrote.

She also defended the post by pointing out that original author Jason Riley is black.

“I want all people to succeed. There is one race — the human race. Did I not honor that African-American author by quoting him? I stand by quoting Jason L. Riley,” she said.

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2016 in Black Conservatives

 

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NYT Lawn Jockey, Jason Riley Rushes to Defend Scalia’s Racism

Don’t want Massa to look bad here….

The simple fact is, black student graduation rates at elite Universities is higher than that at middle of the pack schools. Insofar as the example Porch Negro Riley provides, I now have two nieces who got nieces who have gotten PHds from Duke, one in a STEM field, the other in Poli Sci.

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The class of 2010 was declared the “most diverse” in Harvard’s history and the school continues to build diversity through its undergraduate minority recruitment program. Their efforts seem to be paying off — in 2010, the White and Black student graduation rates were nearly equal — 78 percent of Black students and 79.4 percent of White students graduated. The income threshold for parents not required to make a financial contribution rose from $40,000 to $60,000 in 2006 — making this a more affordable option for low- to middle-income families.

George Washington University, District of Columbia: Located just four blocks from the White House, GWU is an excellent choice for students interested in national politics or international business. The Office of Diversity is dedicated to broadening the scope of students enrolled in the school’s programming. The White-to-Black graduation rate gap is just 3 with the Black student graduation rate at 78.6 percent, just behind White students at 81.4 percent.

University of Chicago: This Midwestern private school boasts some of the highest graduation rates in the country, and Hispanic students are no exception. Hispanic students graduate at a rate of 92 percent while White students are just ahead at 94 percent.

Stony Brook University, New York: A member of the State University System of New York, Stony Brook was recognized as the school with the “Smallest White-Black Graduation Rate Gap” on a 2010 list. The six-year graduation rate for Black students (71.3 percent) actually exceeds White students (58.7 percent).

Indiana University Purdue Indianapolis: A public research university, the college doubled its graduation rate for Black students between 2004 and 2010. Though the school still has a long road ahead, the Black graduation rates rose from 12.6 to 24.8 percent in those six years through targeted programs developed by IUPUI.

The United States once had the highest graduation rate of any nation. Now it stands 10th. For the first time in American history, there is the risk that the rising generation will be less well educated than the previous one. The graduation rate among 25- to 34-year-olds is no better than the rate for the 55- to 64-year-olds who were going to college more than 30 years ago. The most selective private schools—-Harvard, Yale, and -Princeton—show almost no gap between black and white graduation rates.

Scalia Was Right About Race Preferences

With the regularity of Old Faithful, honest remarks on racial matters these days are followed by geysers of liberal indignation and outrage. That is what greeted Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s suggestion last week that less-qualified black students might be better off at less-selective colleges.

During oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, a case concerning race-conscious college admission policies, Justice Scalia cited research that shows how racial preferences can handicap some black students by placing them in elite schools where they don’t have the same credentials of the average student and struggle academically.

“There are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less-advanced school—a slower-track school where they do well,” said Justice Scalia. “I don’t think it stands to reason that it’s a good thing for the University of Texas to admit as many blacks as possible.”

Liberal public figures and media types promptly denounced the remarks. Democratic leader Harry Reid, ever the statesman, stood on the Senate floor Thursday and accused Justice Scalia of endorsing “racist theories.”

We live in a political environment where the intent of a policy aimed at helping minorities is all that matters; questioning the policy’s actual effectiveness is tantamount to racism. Our national debates about racial preferences tend to focus on their legality, not whether they work as intended. Yet both are important, and Justice Scalia is right to question the assumption that racial favoritism in college admissions has been a boon for blacks.

A 2012 book, “Mismatch,” by UCLA law professor Richard Sander and legal journalistStuart Taylor Jr., illustrates why Justice Scalia’s concerns are warranted, and the book has helped revitalize the discussion over affirmative action’s efficacy. But it is worth noting that such concerns have been voiced by conservative and liberal scholars alike and are as old as the policies themselves, which date to the late 1960s.

Nearly 50 years ago, Clyde Summers, a professor at Yale Law School and longtime critic of labor-union discrimination against blacks, explained how preferential admissions policies at elite law schools like his own damaged the educational prospects for black students not only at Yale but also at less-selective schools. When a top-tier school like Duke lowered the admissions criteria for a minority student who met the normal admissions standards for a second-tier school like North Carolina, he noted, the latter institution was left with a smaller pool of qualified applicants and forced to begin admitting students who would be a better fit for a third-tier school, and so on.

“In sum,” wrote Summers (who died in 2010), “the policy of preferential admission has a pervasive shifting effect, causing large numbers of minority students to attend law schools whose normal admission standards they do not meet, instead of attending other law schools whose normal standards they do meet.”

For decades, diversity-obsessed college administrators have tried to conceal information on admissions and student outcomes broken down by race, but the data that have become public is devastating. An analysis of black students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the mid-1980s found that they had scored in the top 10% nationally on the math portion of the SAT but in the bottom 10% among their classmates at MIT. As a result, black students were dropping out at much higher rates, and those who didn’t leave typically received lower grades than their white and Asian classmates. Affirmative action had turned some of the smartest kids in the country into failures, in a misguided effort to obtain some predetermined racial mix on the quad….Read the rest of the Buckdancing Swill here

Lawn Jockey of the Week Award to Jason Riley for his blowjob on Justice Scalia's racism

Lawn Jockey of the Week Award to Jason Riley for his blowjob on Justice Scalia’s racism

 
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Posted by on December 14, 2015 in Black Conservatives

 

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Uncle Tom Jason Riley…Again

I see Uncle Jason is at it again, on his knees betwixt the thighs of his racist white Massas, repeating racist lies with lips pursed, for perhaps, just another chance to please.

The truth is that BlackLivesMatter grew organically from the murder of Trayvon, and before that the Jena 6. It wasn’t a single event, in a vacuum which metastasized into a movement. While a well publicized and documented series of murders of unarmed black men, women, and teens has fueled the movement, and for the first time, forced the American public to face the truth through irrefutable video evidence. The issue is really based around the nexus of the War on Black People (Drugs), the carceral state, and the disparate impact on the black community. DWB isn’t something that just the poor in the inner city have experienced. The videotaped murders, forcing for the first time accountability and prosecution of the Policemen perpetrators, are just the extreme case of racial based policing – and part of an overall malaise of militarization of the pollice affecting the entire country.

The WSJ’s wholly owned mental slave, and morally destitute Lawn Jockey, sets up three strawmen favored by the racist right in his efforts to please –

  1. That it is only about black folks. Like the Civil Rights movement Uncle Jason’s Massas fought against with sticks, bats, dogs, firehoses, guns and bombs to keep those “colored” folks in their place, the new racist mythos that it is only about black folks is a strawman scattered by the whirlwind that accountable policing serves all communities.
  2. That it is only about the murder of Mike Brown. BLM coalesced starting around Ferguson, and the well documented police and “justice system” rape of the community – but gained traction when case after case of police abuse and murder, without any legal consequence hit the press through the irrefutable evidence of citizen videos.  Had the movement just been about Mike Brown – it would have died a long time ago.
  3. “trigger happy cops”…The WSJ’s race whore is trying to conflate the white right’s favorite “black on black killings” with accountability of our public funded police force which is supposed to serve and protect the community. That somehow the fact that gangbangers murder gangbangers over drugs is justification for the murder by police of unarmed people going about their legal and legitimate business on the street. They didn’t just kill Jews in Nazi Germany, it was perfectly acceptable for the SS to kill the mentally ill, deformed, mixed race, and ill on sight, without fear of any repercussion from their government. What the Porch Simian proposes is that America’s police become the SS.

Lastly it is about a lot more than just murders committed under the color of law. It is about DWB. It is about the treatment of a 13 year old girl at a pool party…

And it is about the result of Uncle Jason’s promulgating white conservative racism…

In Charleston.

‘Black Lives Matter’—but Reality, Not So Much

The movement was founded on a falsehood. Scapegoating the police ignores the true threats to the urban poor.

The great lie of the summer has been the Black Lives Matter movement. It was founded on one falsehood—that a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot a black suspect who was trying to surrender—and it is perpetuated by another: that trigger-happy cops are filling our morgues with young black men.

The reality is that Michael Brown is dead because he robbed a convenience store, assaulted a uniformed officer and then made a move for the officer’s gun. The reality is that a cop is six times more likely to be killed by someone black than the reverse. The reality is that the Michael Browns are a much bigger threat to black lives than are the police. “Every year, the casualty count of black-on-black crime is twice that of the death toll of 9/11,” wrote former New York City police detectiveEdward Conlon in a Journal essay on Saturday. “I don’t understand how a movement called ‘Black Lives Matter’ can ignore the leading cause of death among young black men in the U.S., which is homicide by their peers.”

Actually, it’s not hard to understand at all, once you realize that this movement is not about the fate of blacks per se but about scapegoating the police in particular, and white America in general, for antisocial ghetto behavior. It’s about holding whites to a higher standard than the young black men in these neighborhoods hold each other to. Ultimately, it’s a political movement, the inevitable extension of a racial and ethnic spoils system that helps Democrats get elected. The Black Lives Matter narrative may be demonstrably false, but it’s also politically expedient.

It’s the black poor—the primary victims of violent crimes and thus the people most in need of effective policing—who must live with the effects of these falsehoods. As the Black Lives Matter movement has spread, murder rates have climbed in cities across the country, from New Orleans to Baltimore to St. Louis and Chicago. The Washington, D.C., homicide rate is 43% higher than it was a year ago. By the end of August, Milwaukee and New Haven, Conn., both had already seen more murders than in all of 2014.

Publicly, law-enforcement officials have been reluctant to link the movement’s antipolice rhetoric to the spike in violent crime. Privately, they have been echoing South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, who said in a speech last week that the movement was harming the very people whose interests it claims to represent. “Most of the people who now live in terror because local police are too intimidated to do their jobs are black,” the governor said. “Black lives do matter, and they have been disgracefully jeopardized by the movement that has laid waste to Ferguson and Baltimore.”...More (if you can stomach it)…

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2015 in Black Conservatives, Domestic terrorism

 

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Uncle Jason Riley…Again

As a former Web associate used to say…”Buckdance!”

The Uncle Tom show on the Wall Street Journal.

Obama and the wages of racial discord

…But that is not how he has governed. As president, he has repeatedly—and often prematurely—taken sides in local police matters involving black suspects.

He has supported college-admissions policies that favor black applicants over their white and Asian peers. He has dispatched his attorney general to accuse advocates of voter ID laws of trying to disenfranchise blacks and Hispanics. He has pressured wealthy suburbs to change zoning laws and build low-income housing so that he can shoehorn minorities into neighborhoods where they otherwise can’t afford to live. He has leaned on local school districts to discipline students differently based on their race and ethnicity rather than solely on their misbehavior. He has appeared before activists at the NAACP to denounce the criminal-justice system as racially skewed.

When Mr. Obama first ran for president, he went to such lengths to distance himself from professional agitators such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson that “Saturday Night Live” ran a cartoon parody that featured then-Sen. Obama sending Messrs. Sharpton and Jackson off to places like Botswana and Paraguay so that they couldn’t interfere with the campaign.

These days, Mr. Obama has the reverend on speed dial. Mr. Sharpton is a frequent White House visitor and the president’s point man on civil-rights issues. Given that the president is keeping company with someone who monetizes racial conflict for a living, is it any wonder that so many people believe race relations have regressed?…

The Black Lives Matter movement may be built on a falsehood—that cops shooting blacks is somehow a bigger problem than blacks shooting each other—but the falsehood will be indulged by politicians like Mr. Obama because the last thing Democrats want is for black people to stop seeing themselves as helpless victims of systemic racism.

“A central problem—perhaps the central problem—in improving the relationship between white and black Americans is the difference in racial crime rates,” observed the late political scientist James Q. Wilson. “The high black crime rate cannot be wished away by talk of racism, overarresting, excessive punishment, or whites having allegedly drugged or armed blacks.”

Let’s get into a couple of things here. FIrst – who is James Q. WIlson?

Wilson basically is the guy who brought us two totally discredited theories with severely adverse impact on America.

His most significant legacy, however, lies in the impact of his scholarship and journalism on the contemporary structures of social control in the United States. His 1975 book Thinking About Crime provides academic justification for a massive increase in imprisonment in the United States that began in the late 1970s and has yet fully to run its course. (The United States incarcerates at five times the rate of Britain, the leading jailer in Europe.)

Wilson was largely responsible for the US becoming a carceral state. If black folks were incarcerated more frequently – it was because of their lower moral standards, resulting in high crime rates in Wilson’s view.

Wilson developed the right wing’s crime mythology. Here is his framework for the “welfare mother” who he considered “Criminal”, and the single parenthood to crime meme. According to former conservative star Glen Loury, there was a close association with racists, not only in the financing of AEI, Hoover, and Manhattan institute for which he worked, but in groupthink and material –

Indeed, my appreciation of “Gentleman Jim” dates back nearly three decades, to 1983, when he came to my humble Afro-American Studies office at Harvard, practically hat in hand, with a draft chapter on “race and crime” for an as-yet-unpublished book, Crime and Human Nature. He was writing it with Richard Herrnstein, who would go on to write The Bell Curve (1994) with Charles Murray. Wilson asked for my unsparing critique, which I provided. It impressed me that, when the book appeared two years later, he and Herrnstein had taken my criticisms seriously.

That last association ended for me in 1995, when I publicly resigned my position after AEI fellows wrote two incendiary and what seemed to me borderline racist books—The Bell Curve and The End of Racism (1995), by Dinesh D’Souza. In those years, and partly in response to those two books, I began my long march out of the right wing of American intellectual life. And, in so doing, I slowly came to the view—which I continue to hold—that some of Wilson’s labors have done enormous damage to the quality of American democracy.

The man Hoover Institute is named after, President Herbert Hoover, created the “Lilly White Policy”  to drive black from the Republican Party and recruit southern whites. Much of the material of these 3 on this topic, like that of Murray and D’Souza is based on fake, or faulty figures. By ignoring violent crimes which are commited by whites at 3-7 times that of black or Hispanics, and actually reversing the statistics on rape – Wilson, Hernstrom, and D’Souza were able to construct a racial (racist in Loury’s view) strawman, which continues to be central to conservative belief today.

Wilson’s second major influence was in the creation of “Broken WIndows Policing” first introduced in conjunction with  George L. Kelling in an article in the Atlantic Monthly in 1982. I don’t believe there is any question anymore about the impact of that one.

Lastly, Wilson’s theory of the “Welfare Mother”.

The reason I picked on Wilson (and not only because he is referenced) is to point out specifically whose loins Uncle Jason is paying lip service to.

You Betcha – Come on down and get your “Lawn Jockey of the Week Award”, Jason!

MGA9198PORLZEW2

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2015 in Black Conservatives

 

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The WSJ’s Uncle Tom, Jason Riley

When I was a young man starting out in business, reading the Wall Street Journal was a requirement for those who wanted to be savvy about the business world. In the passenger lounges in airports or the train station legions of folks read the paper daily on their commute. The quality of the articles, insights, and writing was incredible…

Then something happened. That something was the acquisition of the paper by right wing media mogul Rupert Murdoch…

The paper sold out to conservative clowns, and reading it became akin to skinny dipping in a sewer. Much like when well known and respected product manufacturers sell out to mass marketers who wish to profit from their name to sell cheap, low quality goods…The WSJ  became Breitbart with a historically respected and legitimate name.

One of the requirements of any conservative rag is to have their very own, in house Uncle Tom to deflect from the racist mouthings and utterances of their white “reporters”.

Jason Riley’s foray into self prostitution made him the WSJ’s boy.

“I think there’s a pattern at MSNBC of them hiring Black mediocrities like Melissa Harris-Perry, Michael Eric Dyson, Touré, and, of course — the granddaddy of them all — Al Sharpton, simply to race-bait,”Wall Street Journal’s said on WSJ’s Political Diary program.

So… I got curious. From what pedestal of accomplishment does Uncle Jason base his utterings? So I looked up the bios…

Jason Riley

Editorial board member, The Wall Street Journal.

Jason Riley is a member of The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board. He joined the paper in 1994 as a copyreader on the national news desk in New York. He moved to the editorial page in 1995 as copyreader and later became a copy editor. In April 1996, he was named to the newly created position of editorial interactive editor and maintained the editorial and Leisure & Arts section of WSJ.com. He was named a senior editorial page writer in March 2000, and member of the Editorial Board in 2005.

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mr. Riley earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has also worked for USA Today and the Buffalo News.

Melissa V. Harris-Perry

is host of MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry.” The show airs on Saturdays and Sundays from 10AM to noon ET.

Harris-Perry is also professor of political science at Tulane University, where she is founding director of the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South. She previously served on the faculties of the University of Chicago and Princeton University.

Harris-Perry is author of the well received book, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America(Yale 2011) which argues that persistent harmful stereotypes-invisible to many but painfully familiar to black women-profoundly shape black women’s politics, contribute to policies that treat them unfairly, and make it difficult for black women to assert their rights in the political arena.

Her first book, Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought, won the 2005 W. E. B. Du Bois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and 2005 Best Book Award from the Race and Ethnic Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.

Professor Harris-Perry is a columnist for The Nation magazine, where she writes a monthly column also titled Sister Citizen. In addition to hosting her own show on MSNBC she provides expert commentary on U.S. elections, racial issues, religious questions and gender concerns for a variety of other media outlets.

Her academic research is inspired by a desire to investigate the challenges facing contemporary black Americans and to better understand the multiple, creative ways that African Americans respond to these challenges. Her work is published in scholarly journals and edited volumes and her interests include the study of African American political thought, black religious ideas and practice, and social and clinical psychology.

Professor Harris-Perry’s creative and dynamic teaching is also motivated by the practical political and racial issues of our time. Professor Harris-Perry has taught students from grade school to graduate school and has been recognized for her commitment to the classroom as a site of democratic deliberation on race.

She travels extensively speaking to colleges, organizations and businesses in the United States and abroad. In 2009 Professor Harris-Perry became the youngest scholar to deliver the W.E.B. Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. Also in 2009 she delivered the prestigious Ware Lecture, becoming the youngest woman to ever do so.

Professor Harris-Perry received her B.A. in English from Wake Forest University, her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University and an honorary doctorate from Meadville Lombard Theological School. And she studied theology at Union Theological Seminary in New York. She lives in New Orleans with her husband, James Perry, and is the mother of a terrific daughter, Parker.

Professor Harris-Perry also sits on the advisory board for “Chef’s Move!”, a program whose mission is to diversify kitchen management by providing training, experience and mentorship to minority applicants from New Orleans, sending them to New York City for culinary school training and then bringing them back again to become leaders in the kitchen and in their community.

Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson (born October 23, 1958) is an American academic, author, and radio host. He is a professor of sociology at Georgetown University.[2] Described by Michael A. Fletcher as “a Princeton PhD and a child of the streets who takes pains never to separate the two”,[3] Dyson has authored and edited 18 books dealing with subjects such as Malcolm XMartin Luther King, Jr.Marvin GayeNas’s debut album IllmaticBill CosbyTupac Shakur and Hurricane Katrina.

Dyson was born to Everett and Addie Dyson in Detroit, Michigan. He attended Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan on an academic scholarship but left and completed his education at Northwestern High School.[3] He became an ordainedBaptistminister at 19 years of age.[4]Having worked in factories in Detroit to support his family, he entered Knoxville College as a freshman at age 21.[5] Dyson received his bachelor’s degreemagna cum laude, from Carson–Newman College in 1985.[3] He obtained his master’s and Ph.D in religion, from Princeton University. Dyson serves on the board of directors of the Common Ground Foundation, a project dedicated to empowering urban youth in the United States

Dyson has taught at Chicago Theological SeminaryBrown University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel HillColumbia UniversityDePaul University, and the University of Pennsylvania.[3] Since 2007, he has been a Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University. His 1994 bookMaking Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X became a New York Times notable book of the year.[9] In his 2006 book Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster, Dyson analyzes the political and social events in the wake of the catastrophe against the backdrop of an overall “failure in race and class relations”.[10][11][12] In 2010, Dyson edited Born to Use Mics: Reading Nas’s Illmatic, with contributions based on the album’s tracks by, among others, Kevin Coval, Kyra D. Gaunt (“Professor G”), dream hamptonMarc Lamont HillAdam Mansbach, and Mark Anthony Neal.[13] Dyson’s own essay in this anthology, “One Love,” Two Brothers, Three Verses, explains how the current US penal system disfavors young black males more than any other segment of the population.[14][15] Dyson hosted a radio show, which aired on Radio One, from January 2006 to February 2007. He was also a commentator on National Public Radio and CNN, and is a regular guest on Real Time with Bill Maher. Beginning July 2011 Michael Eric Dyson became a political analyst for MSNBC.

Touré

Touré (born Touré Neblett; March 20, 1971) is an American writer, music journalistcultural critic, and television personality. He is the host ofFuse‘s Hiphop Shop and On the Record and co-host of The Cycle on MSNBC. He was also a contributor to MSNBC‘s The Dylan Ratigan Show and serves on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominating Committee. He teaches a course on the history of hip hop at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, part of the Tisch School of the Arts in New York.

Touré is the author of several books, including The Portable Promised Land (2003), Soul City (2004), Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now (2011), and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon (2013).

While a student at Emory University, Touré founded the school’s black student newspaper, The Fire This Time,[7] which has been criticized for being militantly anti-white.[8][9]The Daily Caller took issue with the fact that the publication only solicited donations from blacks, and that its articles praised noted anti-Semitesblack supremacists, and conspiracy theorists such as H. Rap Brownand Frances Cress Welsing, whom Touré invited to Emory’s campus. The Caller also criticized Touré’s use of a hoaxed hate crime at Emory as a rationale for a list of demands against the university, even after the crime’s ostensible target, Sabrina Collins, admitted that her accusations were a hoax of her creation. Touré defended The Fire This Time as “an important black voice on campus” and “a form of community building.”[8][9]

Touré began his career as a music journalist, contributing articles to Rolling Stone,[10][11][2][12]The New Yorker,[volume & issue needed]The New York Times Magazine,[volume & issue needed]Playboy,[volume & issue needed]The Village Voice,[volume & issue needed]Vibe,[volume & issue needed] and Essence magazine.[volume & issue needed]

His Rolling Stone article about Dale Earnhardt Jr., “Kurt is My Co-Pilot”, was included in The Best American Sports Writing 2001.[12][13]

Touré has written five books, including Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?, a collection of interviews, and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon, a Prince biography.

Now tell me again…Whom is the “mediocrity” here?

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2014 in Black Conservatives

 

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