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Drumphazoid Faces Jail Over Drumph Flag

I wonder if he would be willing to post that voter card rip up on YouTube for verification purposes…

Guy who won’t take down Trump flag faces jail

“I’m not a football fan, I’m not a sports fan, but I’m surely a Donald Trump fan,” Joe Hornick tells NBC 4. The New Jersey man has been flying a Trump flag outside his home for months and he says he will go to jail rather than obey an ordinance in the town of West Long Branch against flying political flags more than 30 days before an election. New Jersey holds its primary on June 7, meaning it will be weeks before Hornick can legally fly the “Make America Great Again” banner. He has already been ticketed, and people have ripped down his flag at least five times. “I have a warehouse on alert, and I’ll put up a flag every time they tear one down,” Hornick says.

Hornick—who says that if Trump loses, he’ll rip up his registration card and never vote again—could get 90 days’ jail time or a $2,000 fine if he doesn’t take down the flag. Hornick says that he has a constitutional right to fly the flag, and the American Civil Liberties Union is supporting him, reports NY 101.5. According to Eugene Volokhat the Washington Post, Hornick is right: Banning political signs or placing similar restrictions on the content of signs violates the First Amendment, Volokh writes, though the city would be within its rights to apply content-neutral restrictions that applied to all signs. (Trump had a rough night Saturday.)

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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Trump Campaign Manager Arrested

The Trump Thugs are going down. Donald Trump’s National Campaign Manager’s mugging of a female reporter has earned him a visit to the Police Station with a charges of assault.

Trump Campaign Manager Charged With Battery Of Reporter He Called ‘Delusional’

Corey Lewandowski turned himself in to police early Tuesday.

Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, was charged with battery Tuesday following an incident in which he allegedly grabbed a reporter, Michelle Fields, at a campaign event earlier this month.

Lewandowski turned himself in to police Tuesday morning in Jupiter, Florida, where he was charged with misdemeanor battery.

Trump and Lewandowski have repeatedly denied that the campaign manager grabbed Fields, and Lewandowski has called Fields “delusional.”

Fields released a photo of her arm with a series of finger-shaped bruises. And newly released video footage appears to show Lewandowski reaching over and roughly grabbing Fields at the Jupiter event, nearly throwing her off balance.

The video suggests that Lewandowski was lying when he attacked Fields’ credibility and accused her of seeking attention. This is a tactic Trump himself has popularized, through vicious and personal attacks on journalists like Megyn Kelly and Jorge Ramos.

Fields resigned from Breitbart News shortly after the incident, because she said the news outlet failed to publicly stand by her.

The Trump campaign responded to the charges Tuesday morning, telling reporters that Lewandowski will plead not guilty and that he intends to fight the charges.

Lewandowski will be represented by two defense lawyers. One of them is Kendall Coffey, a former U.S. attorney who was forced to resign that post in 1996 after he was accused of biting a stripper in Miami.

 
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Posted by on March 29, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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DOJ Newest Civil Rights Strategy – Locking Up Bad Judges

By now it should be obvious to everyone that the problems in Law Enforcement extend to the Judiciary. Further – conservative “No-Tax” freaks on the right have created a system wherein any semblance to a fair an equitable tax system is replaced by a predatory Judicial and draconian laws shifting the tax burden onto the poor. The Ferguson Report was a watershed in exposing such criminal schemes, often which target minorities under The New Jim Crow.

It has been a long time coming, but the DOJ is finally preparing to hold corrupt and predatory Judges at the local level…Accountable.

TITLE 18, U.S.C., SECTION 242

Whoever, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom, willfully subjects any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States, … shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include kidnaping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

What is interesting about this law, is it goes far beyond just the issue of Debtors, and suggests that even local legislators may be held accountable for willfully creating local laws which violate Civil Rights as defined under the Constitution. Which doesn’t mean that a local law challenged before a higher court and ruled unconstitutional makes local legislators liable – but does mean those legislatures which (as in North Carolina) have ruled the Federal Constitution null and void can be tried and jailed for passing laws violating Civil Rights guaranteed under the Constitution.

I gotta believe that Tea Baggers in jail are going to have a harder time than Jared the child molester.

 

How Locking Up Judges Could End Debtors’ Prisons

Civil rights lawyers want the DOJ to give judges who break the law a taste of their own medicine.

Justice Department officials warned U.S. judges and court administrators this week that practices like incarcerating poor people without determining whether they could afford outstanding fines are illegal and unconstitutional.

But civil rights advocates with clients who’ve had their lives torn apart after being accused of petty crimes, receiving traffic tickets or charged with municipal code violations say the feds have a much more effective method of fixing the widespread problem: locking up judges.

In a nine-page letter sent to all state chief justices and state court administrators on Monday, the DOJ’s Vanita Gupta, who heads the Civil Rights Division, and Lisa Foster, the director of the Office of Access to Justice, urged local officials to “review court rules and procedures within your jurisdiction to ensure that they comply with due process, equal protection, and sound public policy.”

Judges who incarcerate poor people because they missed a payment are breaking the law, the letter said. What many courts consider a “routine administrative matter” of forcing defendants to pre-pay a “bond” or “bail” before they’re allowed to schedule a court date is actually unconstitutional, Gupta and Foster wrote. Locking people in cages for long periods of time solely because they can’t afford to buy their freedom is a violation of the country’s supreme law, the U.S. Constitution.

Civil rights advocates praised the Justice Department for sending the letter. However, they say there’s a much more powerful tool available if the feds really want to deter judicial crime: Federal prosecutors can hold judges accountable for their unlawful conduct by charging them with a federal crime.

Section 242 of Title 18 of the U.S. code — the so-called “color of law” statute — is the same federal civil rights legislation that Justice Department prosecutors use against police officers and prison guards who use excessive force and make false arrests. The law applies to prosecutors and judges, too. But the feds don’t use it against them often.

Hub Harrington, a former circuit judge in Shelby County, Alabama, who in 2012called Harpersville Municipal Court a “debtors prison” and a “judicially sanctioned extortion racket,” suggested prosecuting judges who break the law at a December meeting at the White House. He said he approached the Justice Department and the Alabama Attorney General about the issues in Harpersville and was frustrated that former Municipal Court Judge Larry Ward wasn’t charged over his conduct.

“We’ve been talking about the victims,” Harrington said at the time. “What about the perpetrators? We got the laws in place. We already have the law you can’t put indigent people in jail without a hearing. We don’t need more laws. We need to enforce the ones we’ve got.”

Alec Karakatsanis from Equal Justice Under Law, an organization that has been suing cities engaged in widespread unconstitutional practices, said the DOJ letter was a good start and could help “eradicate any notion that any judge can be ignorant of basic principles of constitutional law.” But he hoped bad judges would be indicted.

“For a long time, our courts have become places where impoverished people and people of colors’ rights are violated with virtual impunity every day as a matter of daily practice,” Karakatsanis said. “You’d like to think that the people who are tasked with applying the law are held to the same standards as everyone else, and when people are blatantly violating the law, there should be consequences for them.”

It would be “a hard argument for any judge to make that they thought it was OK for them to be throwing people in jail for not being able to make payments without making any type of inquiry into their ability to pay,” he added. But the problem is so widespread and commonplace that prosecution could be less likely.

“It’s not just a ‘few bad apples,’ we have a legal system that has lost it’s way, become desensitized towards caging people,” Karakatsanis said. “One of the really difficult and sad things about our legal system is that the more common something is, the more difficult it is to prosecute because there’s this sense that ‘Well, everyone is doing it, so it would break the system.’” …Read The Rest Here

 
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Posted by on March 19, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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Jared Fogle, Former Subway Guy Gets Beat-down in Prison

Child molesters tend to have a very rough time in prison. It may or may not be fair…But even felons have standards.

Former Subway Spokesman Jared Fogle Beaten in Prison Attack

Fogle was beaten by an inmate who hates pedophiles. 

It’s well known that pedophiles don’t do well in prison, and Jared Fogle isn’t an exception to that rule. The former Subway spokesman is spending the next 16 years of his life in federal prison after pleading guilty to charges of child pornography and crossing state lines to pay for sex with minors.

In January, according to TMZ, Fogle was beaten to a pulp by Steven Nigg, a 60-year-old inmate who hates the fact that child predators are in a low-security prison. Fogle’s injuries included a bloody nose, swollen face and multiple scratches.

It’s going to be a long 16 years for Fogle.

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2016 in Men, News

 

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Another Jumped Up Charge – Another Black Woman Dead in Jail

Here we go again…

50-Year-Old Black Woman Who Died in Jail Was Denied Water and Medication, Court Filings Allege

Joyce Curnell, a 50-year-old black woman from South Carolina, died in jail last summer less than two weeks after a much more widely reported but similar-sounding incident: the suicide of Sandra Bland. Bland had been pulled over in Texas for failing to signal a lane change; Curnell had been arrested on a bench warrant related to a shoplifting incident from four years earlier. Both women were dead within days of being booked. Together, their cases appeared to be part of a pattern: Black people, and black women in particular, were dying in local jails after being locked up on minor charges. During the month of July 2015 alone, three other such cases were reported.

On Wednesday, the Curnell family filed documents indicating their intention to sue the medical contractor for the Charleston County jail, which they accuse of depriving Curnell of water and medical attention despite unambiguous indications that she was unwell.

There are at least two shocking aspects to the story as described in the documents.

The first is that Curnell was arrested as a direct result of checking into a hospital emergency room. According to Curnell family lawyers, Curnell had been complaining of nausea and vomiting when she was taken to an ER in an ambulance and diagnosed with gastroenteritis. It was during her two-hour stay at Roper St. Francis Hospital that, as the Post and Courier puts it, “it was discovered” that there was a bench warrant for her arrest stemming from a little more than $1,000 in unpaid court fees. How exactly that discovery was made is unclear—do police in Charleston run people’s names for outstanding warrants when they check into hospitals?—but it resulted in the arrival of deputies from the sheriff’s office who took Curnell directly to jail after she was discharged by doctors.

The second shocking aspect of Curnell’s story is that, according to Wednesday’s court filings, she spent her night in jail vomiting continuously but was not given proper medical attention. Instead, the documents allege, jail staff provided her with a trash bag because she could not make it to the bathroom. She was found dead the next day.

The case will likely turn on what the family can prove about the exact cause of Curnell’s death, and what the nurses at the Charleston County Detention Center did and did not do during the 27 hours that Curnell was in custody. The basic allegation, as stated in Wednesday’s court filing, is that Curnell died “because she was deprived of water” and denied the medication that had been prescribed to her during her hospital stay.

One key thing to note is that the target of the legal action here is not the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office, but the private medical company that is contracted to provide medical care to all Charleston County detainees. That company, the Carolina Center for Occupational Health, stands accused of ignoring jailhouse staff when they asked for Curnell to be examined.

The Post and Courier reported that three telephone calls and an email to the contractor went unreturned Wednesday. A representative of the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office, which runs the jail where Curnell died, told the paper he had just learned of the court filings and declined to comment.

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2016 in American Genocide, BlackLivesMatter

 

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Black Panther Released After 43 Years in Solitary

Amazing story… Albert Woodfox was one of the Angola 3, and the last of the three political prisoners to be released.

US’s longest-standing solitary confinement prisoner set free in Louisiana after more than four decades in form of captivity widely denounced as torture

Albert Woodfox, the longest-standing solitary confinement prisoner in the US, held in isolation in a six-by-nine-foot cell almost continuously for 43 years, has been released from a Louisiana jail.

Woodfox, who was kept in solitary following the 1972 murder of a prison guard for which he has always professed his innocence, marked his 69th birthday on Friday by being released from West Feliciana parish detention center. It was a bittersweet birthday present: the prisoner finally escaped a form of captivity that has widely been denounced as torture, and that has deprived him of all meaningful human contact for more than four decades.

For the duration of that time, Woodfox was held in the cell for 23 hours a day. In the single remaining hour, he was allowed out of the cell to go to the “exercise yard” – a small area of fenced concrete – but was shackled and kept alone there as well.

Last November James Dennis, a judge with the federal fifth circuit appeals court, described the conditions of Woodfox’s confinement. “For the vast majority of his life, Woodfox has spent nearly every waking hour in a cramped cell in crushing solitude without a valid conviction,” he said.

In a statement released by his lawyers, Woodfox said that he would use his newfound liberty to campaign against the scourge of solitary confinement that at any one moment sees 80,000 American prisoners being held in isolation. “I can now direct all my efforts to ending the barbarous use of solitary confinement and will continue my work on that issue here in the free world.”

The prisoner’s release came after the state of Louisiana agreed to drop its threat to subject him to a third trial for the 1972 killing. Woodfox in turn pleaded no contest to lesser charges of manslaughter and aggravated burglary.

The “no contest” plea is not an admission of guilt, and Woodfox continues to be not guilty of the main murder charge. He said that “although I was looking forward to proving my innocence at a new trial, concerns about my health and my age have caused me to resolve this case now and obtain my release with this no-contest plea to lesser charges.”

Woodfox was one of the so-called “Angola 3”: three prisoners initially held in Louisiana’s notorious Angola prison, and who subscribed to the Black Panther movement and campaigned against segregation within the institution in the 1970s. His supporters contend that he was framed for the 1972 killing of the prison guard Brent Miller as revenge for his political activities.

His murder conviction was twice overturned – once in 1992 on grounds that he had received ineffective defense representation, and again in 2008 because of racial discrimination in setting up the grand jury that indicted him. Last year, Louisiana announced it would put him through a third trial despite the fact that all the key witnesses to the killing have since died. Woodfox’s lawyers argued the lack of witnesses would render such a retrial a legal mockery.

His two fellow Angola 3 allies were already freed. Robert King was released in 2001 after having his separate conviction overturned, and Herman Wallace, who spent almost 30 years in solitary confinement, was only allowed out of prison two days before he died in 2013.

“There was no logical reason that Louisiana kept him in solitary for so many years, for a crime in which all the evidence was undermined,” King told the Guardian.

“They did it as a war against the ideology of the Black Panthers and because they didn’t want to be seen to have been wrong all this time.”

Scientists have long warned about the dire effects caused by solitary confinement on prisoners even after a few days of such treatment, and several international bodies including the UN have called for it to be banned as a form of torture. The supreme court justice Anthony Kennedy has also spoken out about the practice, remarking that the side-effects of prolonged isolation include anxiety, panic, withdrawal, hallucinations, self-mutilation and suicidal thoughts and behavior.

George Kendall, Woodfox’s attorney with Squire Patton Boggs LLP, said his client’s decades-long isolation was indefensible. “Albert survived the extreme and cruel punishment of 40-plus years in solitary confinement only because of his extraordinary strength and character. These inhumane practices must stop. We hope the Louisiana department of corrections will reform and greatly limit its use of solitary confinement as have an increasing number of jurisdictions around the country.”

Amnesty International USA, which long campaigned for his release, said that “nothing will truly repair the cruel, inhuman and degrading solitary confinement that the state of Louisiana inflicted upon him. But this belated measure of justice is something he has been seeking for more than half his life.”

In 2014, Woodfox described to a blogger the fear that wells up in him from being constantly alone. “I’m afraid I’m going to start screaming and not be able to stop,” he said.

“I’m afraid I’m going to turn into a baby and curl up in a fetal position and lay there like that day after day for the rest of my life. I’m afraid I’m going to attack my own body, maybe cut off my balls and throw them through the bars the way I’ve seen others do when they couldn’t take any more.

“No television or hobby craft or magazines or any of the other toys you call yourself allowing can ever lessen the nightmare of this hell you help to create and maintain.”

Woodfox’s release was raised at the White House press briefing on Friday. The White House press secretary, Josh Earnest, said: “Scientists tell us that prolonged incarceration in solitary confinement can have a debilitating and long-term impact on an individual’s mental health. If our ultimate goal in the criminal justice system is to give people a second chance after they’ve paid their debt to society we are basically setting them up to fail.”

Last month Barack Obama used his executive powers to ban solitary confinement for juveniles in all federal prisons. He has also commissioned a review into the use of solitary in the US.

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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Death by Incarceration – Why Are Black Women Arrested For Minor Violations Dying in Jail?

Somehow a 16 year old 100lb black girl is more threat to the system than a white 40 year old mass murderer…

16 Year Old Gynna McMillen

Why Are Black Girls and Women Dying in Police Custody?

Gynna McMillen was brought into the Lincoln Village Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, on January 10, 2016, after police were called to her mother’s house about a “domestic incident.” The next morning she was found unresponsive in a cell. What happened to her? Why is she dead after less than 24 hours in the detention facility? These are questions being asked by Gynna’s family and others concerned about the deaths of Black people in police custody.

Slowly, investigators are releasing information, and what we know so far is horrifying. Gynna McMillen, a 16-year-old Black girl, died in a detention center where staff used martial arts to restrain her when she refused to remove her sweatshirt. Gynna McMillen died while isolated in a cell. Gynna McMillen died alone: No one followed the protocol to check on her every 15 minutes.

Black children have always faced disproportionately brutal treatment in jail. “Opportunities Lost: Racial Disparities in Juvenile Justice in Kentucky and Identified Needs for Systems Change,” a 2009 issue brief written and published by Kentucky Youth Advocates, details disproportionate contact with children of color at every level of the juvenile legal system, from complaints against youth to arrest and detainment. Despite representing only 9.5 percent of the Kentucky youth population, African-American youth are more than twice as likely as white youth to have complaints filed against them, four times more likely to be detained during any point in court processing and more than four times as likely to have their cases referred to adult courts.

In 2013, the rate of African-American youth detained in juvenile detention, correctional and/or residential facilities was 495 per 100,000, the highest of any racial or ethnic group, according to National Kids Count data. For African-American girls specifically, the rate was 78 per 100,000, according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

While the arrest rate has declined for boys in the juvenile legal system, it has not fallen as sharply for girls. African-American girls represent 33.2 percent of girls who are detained, although they are only 14 percent of the population. Many incarcerated girls have experienced one or more traumas, including abuse, poverty, mental illness and being funneled through child welfare systems. Instead of receiving the help they need, girls are routed into the juvenile legal system because of their victimization. Sometimes, their response to trauma is itself criminalized. As Monique Morris wrote in America’s Wire, African-American girls are often criminalized for qualities associated with survival, such as being loud and defiant….Read The Rest Here

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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