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Tag Archives: Immigration

That “Immigration” Thing Gets Real

Out here in the country, you get a unique view of what the Chumph’s Storm Troopers have done relative to immigration.

You see…Any crop that can’t be picked by machine is picked by…”illegal” immigrants. Migrant workers.

The above picture is of a local tomato field. It is owned by one of major food producers, Del Monte. This is a large field, I would guess in the 150 acre+ range, normally containing about 3 million tomato plants. The tomatoes grown here go in everything from your spaghetti sauce, tomato sauce, canned tomatoes, and any other product using a tomato puree.

Normally in this part of the world, they plant two crops of tomatoes on these fields, and by July 4th are harvesting the “spring” crop.  There was no spring crop this year. What you are looking at is the long rows of plastic mulch protecting the little tomato plants which are spaced every foot or so. Here is another view.

Noooooo tomatoes! You see, special tractors groom the land, pile the dirt into those long straight mounds, and cover the rows for the plants in plastic.

Then crews of several hundred migrant workers use a little tool which punches through the plastic and plants the baby plants one at a time, a foot apart all the way down that long strip of plastic. When the plants get about a foot tall, the crews come back and insert a tomato stake next to each plant and tie the plant to the stake with a twist tie.

Small problem this year…

No migrant workers.

So Delmonte has lost one crop…And is pretty close to losing a second – wiping out the whole year.

This is a Chumph world with no “Mexicans” (Most of the current Migrant workers aren’t from Mexico, they are from further South, places like El Salvador or Guatemala).

It is the same all over, as I see other food producer fields either fallow, or turned over to machine crops like corn or soy.

So when conservative blowhards like Rich Lowery announce – Trump Is Winning the Immigration Debate …

It’s kinda funny. Tell me that again when product shortages drive the cost of a can of diced tomatoes from $0.99 to $4.00. And that bottle of Ragu starts costing $5.00 this fall.

Just a hint, but you may want to stock up now.

 

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In Mexico – “Trump Toilet Paper”

It is the only wipe which leaves you feeling dirtier than you were before using it!

Take a dump on the Trump…Indeed.

Mexican Lawyer Markets Trump-Branded Toilet Paper For A Very Good Cause

A lawyer in central Mexico is taking the fight against President Donald Trump to the toilet.

Antonio Battaglia is reportedly planning to launch a “Trump” branded toilet paper later this year — with 30 percent of the profits going toward financing programs that support migrants and Mexicans deported from the U.S.

A photograph of the prototype packaging shows a cartoon version of Trump giving a thumbs-up, alongside the slogan “softness without borders.”

The image was shared online earlier this week, and is now going viral.

Battaglia told Expansion that he was initially inspired to release a product that made a stand against Trump following the businessman’s “insulting” comments about Mexicans as he announced his candidacy for the presidency in June 2015.

When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

It annoyed me and I started to look for a way to do something that would have an impact,” Battaglia said. “Not in a mocking tone or as revenge, but in a positive way.”

The lawyer said he initially planned to register a clothing or shoe line under the “Trump” name. His family runs a shoe-making business. But he discovered that Mexico’s Institute of Industrial Property had already granted the trademarks to the Trump Organization.

“Then came the idea of producing a toilet paper, a product that was ironic and that would remain in the market for a good time,” said Battaglia, who is investing 400,000 pesos of his own money (about $21,400) into the project.

To his relief, he found the “Trump” trademark for “hygienic paper” had not yet been taken. According to The Associated Press, the Institute approved his trademark application for “Trump” toilet paper in October 2015.

Battaglia hopes to begin selling the paper in September, but says making money from the project is “secondary.” “What I want is that it is useful to help migrants and the deported.”

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2017 in Chumph Butt Kicking, The Clown Bus

 

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Sally Yates Smackdown of Smarmy Ted Cruz

Bad news Ted Sleazy – the kind of folks who rise to high positions in the DOJ without political appointments during, at least, Democrat Presidencies tend to be both smart and qualified, and real lawyers. Which is why Sally Yates just had your ass for lunch.

 

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Farmers Get the Shaft Under Chumph’s Immigration

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This is a common sight in the fields around where I currently live. Immigrants, mostly undocumented, picking the crops. These guys disappear…Say goodbye to your spaghetti sauce and pizzas. The pick tomatoes green, and then turn the red by gassing them with nitrogen. Otherwise the tomato is so soft it rots before getting to market. Last year, the tomato field was planted with cantaloupes –  the same crew (rounded up by an entrepreneurial ex-illegal – now citizen) was out there to pick them.

The Chumph’s Immigrant crackdown is getting ready to cost Americans greatly, and where it hurts – at the grocery store. We have become spoiled since the 50’s days to terrible TV Dinners and certain fruits and vegetables only being available during certain parts of the year. You don’t realize that until you go to a country which doesn’t have the agricultural infrastructure the US has.

A number of crops cannot be picked by machine. Tomatoes are too delicate. Add spinach, kale, cucumbers, lettuce, grapes, oranges, apples, pears, and a host of other fruit and vegetables which have to be picked by hand. Since the 60’s, and almost elusively now those crops are picked by undocumented immigrants.

That may be fine out there in the mid-west, where the principal crops of wheat and corn can be picked by machine. But unless you plan to subsist on a diet of popcorn and wheaties…

If the undocumented disappear, so do the strawberries, blueberries, and and damn near anything except bananas (they are gown in Latin America) to go with your cereal.

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What happens to the independent farmer who provides those crops?

One last note…

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Black folks don’t pick cotton anymore…

 

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Assimilate or Die…History and the Chumph

Been watching, with interest, a PBS show, “The American Experience: The Great War” describing the events leading to, and America’s entry into WWI. Of particular interest is Woodrow Wilson. who was President at that time, and how he migrated from professing strong anti-war sentiments to becoming near dictator in his pursuit of American involvement in the war.

America in the 1900-1920 era had just expeienced a period of mass immigration. Over 30% of the population was foreign born. Immigrants were so prevalent that language became an issue in the first brigades formed to go fight in WWI, where the soldiers spoke 42 different  languages, not including English.

Intensely racist with reputed relations with the KKK, Wilson is reviled for his support of Jim Crow, and re-segregation of the Federal Government. His racism only extended to African-Americans, and when setting up the Military, Asians and Hispanics were considered “white” and were enlisted in white regiments, while black soldiers were enlisted in all-black segregated units of which the Harlem Hellcats are the most famous.

“The white men were roused by a mere instinct of self-preservationuntil at last there had sprung into existence a great Ku Klux Klan, a veritable empire of the South, to protect the Southern country.” – Woodrow Wilson

Wilson, faced with a large immigrant population did two things. First, the largest immigrant population in America at the time were German-Americans. Wilson ordered a propaganda campaign to erase the German culture in America through mass intimidation and overt anti-ethnicism. German immigrants were harassed, violently attacked, and in several cases lynched. He then launched a campaign to erase the use of the “hyphenated” American (sound familiar?) insisting that ethnic and class divisions would disappear if only “we were all just Americans”.Lastly, he asked Congress to pass two acts, the “Espionage Act”, and the “Sedition Act”, which allowed the government to jail anyone for even minimal objection to the actions of the government. Thousands were jailed for reasons as trite as criticizing the “Draft Act” in a bar. During the 1910-1920 period America became no different than the authoritarian government which would be later formed by the fascists and communists.

“[Reconstruction government was detested] not because the Republican Party was dreaded but because the dominance of an ignorant and inferior race was justly dreaded.” – Woodrow Wilson

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The Chumph Borg

“Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready.” – Woodrow Wilson

So when you hear the Chumph talk about “Immigrants”…It’s just the same shit, different century. And the place he wants to take the country is right back to the fascism of the early 20th Century. Look at the laws being passed by Republicans to punish peaceful protesters. This crap is right out of the neo-Nazi “Sedition Act” passed by Wilson.

“Now came multitudes of men of the lowest class from the south of Italy, and men of the meaner sort out of Hungary and Poland, men out of the ranks, where there was neither skill nor energy nor any initiative of quick intelligence, and they came in numbers which increased from year to year, as if the countries of the south of Europe were disburdening themselves of the more sordid and hapless elements of their population.” – Woodrow Wilson

Trump wants immigrants to ‘share our values.’ They say assimilation is much more complex

Growing up in La Puente in the 1980s, Alex Espinoza was a typical child of the Reagan era. He collected “Star Wars” action figures and played with Rubik’s Cube.

But Espinoza was Mexican, born in Tijuana and brought to the United States by his mother when he was about 2 years old. He downplayed his Mexican roots to fit in. At the time, it seemed the worst thing in the world for a boy to be labeled as “a TJ” — literally someone from Tijuana, but also shorthand for an unassimilated Mexican.

“I grew up preferring the taste of a Big Mac over a burrito. I grew up preferring the taste of tuna noodle casserole over menudo,” he said. “Until I went to Mexico as a grad student, Mexico was this kind of static in the background.”

Three decades later, President Trump has sparked a new debate over immigration and assimilation that has Espinoza and many others reflecting on what it means to blend into American culture.

While much has been made about Trump’s harsh talk of deporting those here illegally, the president’s comments about the need for immigrants to fully embrace American culture has renewed a long-running debate that dates back generations.

“Not everyone who seeks to join our country will be able to successfully assimilate,” President Trump said in a campaign-trail speech in which he called for new immigrants to pass an “ideological certification to make sure that those we are admitting to our country share our values and love our people.”

In one Republican debate, Trump declared that “we have a country where, to assimilate, you have to speak English … This is a country where we speak English, not Spanish.”

Though Espinoza and others might disagree with Trump’s policies on immigration, they say discussions about assimilation get to the heart of a balancing act all immigrants face: being American while preserving a strong sense of where they came from.

“Have I been assimilated? I don’t know,” said the 45-year-old director of the graduate creative writing and literary arts program at Cal State Los Angeles. “Some people will probably say yes — look at how I dress and speak and where I’m educated. And some people will say no — he speaks Spanish and has a Mexican passport.”

When he went to Mexico for the first time as an adult, the way he spoke, tripping over some Spanish words, instantly pegged him as American. Espinoza is a permanent legal resident but believes that even if he became a U.S. citizen he would never be considered “fully American” by some people.

“Even if I started right now speaking in a Southern drawl and listening to country music, I’m still going to be Mexican,” he said. “My skin is still going to be a certain shade. Assimilation is not this thing where it’s like, OK, I’m one of you.”

Though people often define assimilation in starkly different ways, a Pew Research Center survey released in February showed that 92% of Americans say it’s at least somewhat important for a person to speak English to be considered “truly American,” with 70% saying it’s “very” important.

More than 80% of the survey’s respondents believed that sharing American culture and traditions is at least somewhat important to national identity.

“We at least have absorbed and believe this national narrative that we are a nation of immigrants,” said Bruce Stokes, director of global economic attitudes at Pew. “But … it’s not so easy once you get into some of the details of diversity. People are saying, ‘This is good for the country, but it’s not good for me,’ and that ‘Diversity is good, but I actually I don’t like the fact that someone speaks Spanish in the store I go to.’”

These questions have dominated immigrant communities dating back to the 19th century, when the Italians, Irish, Germans, Chinese and other groups faced questions about whether they were true Americans.

The foreign-born share of the U.S. population has quadrupled in the five decades since the establishment of the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, which ended a quota system based on national origin that favored white European immigrants. In 1960, 9.7 million foreign-born residents were living in the U.S. In 2014, there were 42.2 million, according to census data and the Pew Research Center.

Kevin Solis, who works for the immigration advocacy group Dream Team LA, said politicians’ statements about assimilation just add fuel to an already sensitive subject.

“When you say, ‘They need to assimilate,’ you’re already beginning with the false notion that they don’t want to, that they’re coming here as an invading force,” he said. “It’s coded in the sense that these are ‘other’ people, foreigners who want to do harm to our nation, and that’s not the case.”

Jim Chang, an information systems specialist from Irvine, recalled meeting with one of his son’s teacher; she kept repeating what he was saying.

“I know he was repeating, you know, saying it more than once because she was worried I didn’t understand,” Chang, 53, said.

Though he spoke English fairly well and understood it even better, Chang said his Korean accent meant he would always stick out.

“It doesn’t matter if you have 12 years or 20 years in the U.S. If they hear us sound a little different, they judge,” he said.

That’s something he said he believes his son, a fifth-grader, shouldn’t have to face. Chang speaks Korean to him, but his son, Jimmy, responds in English.

“I realize that we don’t plan to return to live in Korea. We belong in California now,” Chang said.

But Carmen Fought, a linguistics professor at Pitzer College, said that everyone has an accent regardless of how well they speak English. Whether it’s the Cajun or so-called “Minnesota nice” or “Bronx” or other accent not quite on the radar of American pop culture, everyone in the U.S. speaks with an accent, she said.

Not all accents, however, are perceived as equally American.

“A way of speaking that’s associated with a group that’s stigmatized is also going to be stigmatized,” Fought said. “There’s also going to be racism and prejudice against that way of speaking.”

Karen, a 24-year-old honor student at Cal State Fullerton, is an aspiring certified public accountant. She volunteers for the IRS — where her ability to speak Spanish is a major asset — helping low-income people fill out their taxes.

The night Trump was elected, Karen — a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, recipient who asked that her last name not be used because she fears deportation — suddenly felt as if she stood out even though she was an infant sleeping in the back seat of a car when she was brought to the U.S. illegally from Mexico.

Karen hasn’t been back to Mexico since then but grew up in the overwhelmingly Latino community of Huntington Park, watching Spanish-language television with her grandmother and working in a Mexican restaurant.

Moving to Orange County for college was like moving to a different world, Karen said. At least until Trump’s election, she felt that she was safer as a college student than her parents, who have labor-oriented jobs.

Her younger brother is a DACA recipient also, and she had him move in with her so they could remove their parents’ address from their federal forms.

“Sometimes I feel like I don’t belong anywhere,” she said. “In Mexico, I would be seen very differently because of my accent. It’s like, god, what do I do? If I were to go back, I wouldn’t have anything back there.”

“On the one side, the Hispanics tell you, ‘You’re way too American.’ On the other, you’ll have the Americans telling you you’re too Hispanic. It’s hard to be in the middle.”

“What makes me American? It’s not only the 24 years of my life,” she said. “It’s that this is all I know.”

 

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Auschwitz Survivor Damns Chumph Administration and ICE

Here is a survivor of not only the Auschwitz Death Camp, but Dachau.

Powerful words.

 
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Posted by on March 30, 2017 in American Genocide

 

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The New Tech Revolution – Politics

Seems a lot of time and energy was spent last election cycle on people who are not working. Not much about the 95% who are. A little known fact due to the antique ways the Government Economists draw up the numbers is the technology related services and non-manufacturing portion of America’s GDP is larger than Manufacturing. The Tech Industry employs over 6.7 million people. The U.S. tech industry is a major driving force in the overall economy, accounting for 7.1 percent of overall GDP and 11.6 percent of total private sector payroll. While roughly 12.3 million are involved in manufacturing, the oversize impact on the percentage of US payroll is driven by higher wages – A U.S. tech industry worker averages an annual wage of $105,400 compared to $51,600 for the average private sector wage. That isn’t readily apparent by looking at the Government numbers because the Tech Industry is split across hardware manufacturing and services.

The US has lost about 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2010, since the Great Recession that number is about 7 million.. The truth is that America has lost some 7 million manufacturing jobs and added some 53 million jobs in services. Further, of those 53 million new jobs some 62% of them were in higher paying occupations than those “high paying good jobs” in manufacturing we lost.

The canard that somehow “regulations”, as well a bringing manufacturing jobs back to America…Is total “Vaporware”. Robots have, and will continue to replace humans, especially in heavy manufacturing – meaning those new “factories” will be empty of people.What the impact of removing those regulations and seriously tilting the landscape in favor of the corporation over the workers will be has yet to be seen.

However, with 6.5 million tech works, and perhaps another 10-15 million jobs dependent on the tech industry. Tech workers are a powerful political force. Life is about to get really tough for those wanting to roll back worker protections, pursue antiquated social agendas, and operating to the benefit if the 1% …

“The Matrix” is organizing into a political leviathan to oppose Trump and his backward thinking political party. This is war.

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The Tech Industry Joins the Political Fray

Across the sector, employees are asking their companies and top executives to engage in policy battles in a way that departs from long-standing precedent.

However expansive its ambitions to change the world might be, the tech industry is not known as a hotbed of activism. Historically, tech employees went to work, got the job done, and didn’t talk much about politics.

But in the wake of Donald’s Trump’s election, political talk is nearly everywhere—at company-wide meetings, in discussions among coworkers in the cafeterias, and in employee resource-group meet-ups. For obvious reasons: Many of the policies and views of the Trump administration are anathema to most of the tech industry. In particular, the sector is heavily populated by immigrants—many founders and senior leaders are immigrants, and 60 percent of STEM employees in Silicon Valley are foreign-born (for comparison, only 17 percent of the overall American labor force is foreign-born)—and Trump’s immigration policies (both proposed and enacted) constitute a clear threat to both the industry’s profits and its meritocratic ideology. His brand of politics—“closed borders,” “alternative facts”—is at odds with the primacy the industry places on data, openness, and the free flow of talent around the globe.

Trump’s victory in November stunned many tech employees. Barrie Segal, a senior program manager at the database company MongoDB, said, “There was a lot of confusion and sadness. People were openly weeping in the office. I’ve never seen that before at work.” As one senior manager at a major tech company described it, “It was like a bomb dropped and people died.” (Despite the outpouring of anti-Trump sentiment in the industry, many people I spoke with and the companies they work for asked not to be identified on the record, citing sensitive political times. Such concerns indicate that there are limits to just how public and forthcoming the industry will be with its activism.)

In response, an uptick in activism is evident throughout the industry: Attendance at meetings of advocacy groups like the Tech Workers Coalition have spiked. New organizations like Tech Solidarity have emerged. Last week, at a rally held by a new group called Tech Stands Up, around 1,000 people showed up over the course of the afternoon in downtown Palo Alto to show their support.

Back in late January, in the days after Trump’s first executive order on immigration barring refugees and stopping all entry of citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries, more than 2,000 at eight Google offices walked out to protest the order. There was thunderous applause when Google’s CEO, Sundar Pichai, and its co-founder, Sergey Brin, spoke at the walkout. “It was a powerful moment,” said one senior manager at Google who attended. “I’ve never been to anything like that at work before. The walkout was definitely in support of what the leadership is doing. But not so subtly, it was also a challenge not to compromise.” Noting that the leadership team at Google would be exposing the company to risk by actively opposing Trump, the manager said that employees have been given assurances that executives are “using [their] influence behind the scenes” to stand up for what they believe is right. “But there was an unstated message at the walkout,” the manager said. “‘Don’t fuck this up.’”

Inspired by those Google employees, workers at Comcast organized their own protest. To coordinate logistics and share information, an internal channel on Slack, an instant-messaging app, named “Walk Out” was set up. Within days, 1,700 people had joined the Slack channel and about a thousand Comcast employees at offices in several states walked out. After the walkout, employees wanted to keep up their political engagement and extend their reach beyond their company, so they created another Slack channel, a public one called “Innovation Activism,” for connecting with people across the tech industry in Philadelphia, where Comcast is headquartered. Internal company Slack channels have been created so that employees can keep each other updated with political information about things like which organizations to support and the phone numbers of congressional representatives.

“Workplace politicking of this kind is highly unusual,” says Sarah Soule, a professor of organizational behavior at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University (and a colleague of mine). “Typically, workplace activism is focused on issues internal to the firm. Workers go on strike because they are unhappy with pay or working conditions. They push companies to offer domestic-partner benefits or improve their environmental practices. The goal is to get the company itself to change its practices in some way.”

What is happening right now in tech is different: Rather than advocating for internal policies, employees are putting pressure on their companies to become vocal opponents of the Trump administration—by having CEOs make public statements, by turning down certain government contracts, by signing on to legal briefs contesting Trump’s policies. Of the 127 companies that signed onto the amicus brief filed in support of Washington state’s legal challenge to the immigration executive order, the majority are tech companies.

Coworker.org, a digital platform designed to give workers more of a voice at their companies through online petitions and internal social networks, has seen a substantial increase in engagement since election day. “For the past few years, most of the campaigns have been in the retail and service sectors among front-line workers like baristas and bank tellers,” says Michelle Miller, a co-founder of Coworker.org. “But since the election, a greater variety of industries are reaching out to us. We could double our staff and put one person just on tech and we still would not be able to meet the demand.”

Not only is this form of workplace activism rare, but this kind of rapid political mobilization is also rare. It usually takes place only under certain circumstances, like when people feel that their way of life is under threat. Such was the case after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident in 1979. Prior to the accident, environmental activism in the surrounding area was minimal. But afterward, many of the middle-class residents living nearby, who had no previous history of political protest, came out en masse.

Called “suddenly imposed grievances” or “moral shocks” by researchers, events like Three Mile Island and the 2016 presidential election are galvanizing political forces because they generate intense concern, and people who become the most politicized are those most outraged and directly threatened by the grievance. Since tech is uniquely under threat both ideologically and economically, it is exactly the industry one might expect to take on a new activist vigor. This also sheds light on the lack of response in other industries. Notably, no old-school car companies, finance or insurance companies, food conglomerates, or large retailers signed onto the amicus brief or saw employees at corporate go off the job in protest—perhaps because under Trump they are less at risk.

For many in tech, this is the first time they’ve taken part in political activism in their lives. Aaron Martin-Colby, a Comcast engineer who helped to organize the walkout there, said, “I’ve never done something like this before. I’ve been reluctant to invest anything emotional into politics because of the gridlock. But Trump has the power to do a great deal of unjust harm. I’ve realized it’s important that I make noise.”

Taking their activism a step further, other companies are putting their own proprietary tools to work in opposing Trump. After the executive order on immigration, the social-gathering platform Meetup decided to hold a “resist-a-thon.” The company’s business operations stopped for two days and during that time employees launched over 1,000 “#Resist” Meetup groups in 1,000 cities. To lower the barrier to entry, they made joining these groups free and enabled anyone in the group to schedule an event. They promoted these groups to their 30 million members and partnered with organizations like Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union to distribute ideas for promoting activism, such as hosting an emergency meetup to talk about how to protect Planned Parenthood or meetups to provide training on how to organize. The “#Resist” Meetup groups launched on February 6. Within a week, they had 50,000 members. As of last week, they had over 120,000 members involved, 6,500 related events scheduled, and more than 45,000 people who had RSVP’d….Read the rest here

 
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Posted by on March 28, 2017 in Second American Revolution

 

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