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Tag Archives: History

These confederate Monuments

Turns out, the State with the most confederate Memorials is my home State, Virginia. Some of the Historical reasons is tha a good part of the Civil War was fought here, a number of the key military Generals (Lee, Jackson, Stuart) were Virginians, and the fact that Richmond was the Capital of the confederacy. The descendants of those families still live here.There has been a push to remove the Monuments or rename buildings and roads named after them through the years – but the connection to Virginia born people tends to moderate the responses from both sides. At least it did until Charlottesville where a bunch of outsiders came in in their Nazi gear to wreak havoc.

One of those dots on the map is near where I live, and I have seen the monument. It is to the local soldiers who died in the “War Between the States”. The fact that they all fought as confederates, well…Is what it is.The family names of those guys live on today as part of the local population. Hard for me, at least, to work up any ire over this. Let it be.

The State was as segregated under Jim Crow as any in the South. Let it be. You can get a confederate license  plate in Virginia by joining the Sons of Confederate Veterans, Let it be.

Image result for Virginia SCV LIcense Plate

There is a historical context in Virginia because that is where a large part of the war was, and that was where these folks fought. There simply is no relevance to a Lee, Jackson, or Stuart statue in any state other than Virginia, Maryland (Antietam), and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania where they fought. In Virginia at several of the Battlefields there are still bullets, cannonballs, and bones lightly buried in the battlefields where they fought.So this is part of our living history.

So I am not sure all of these need to come down – and support moving some to historically significant places. You want to move those confederate generals from Monument Avenue in Richmond to the Battlefields at Bull Run, Manassas, Fredericksburg, or Cold Harbor…I won’t object at all.

So what I am arguing here is a common-sense approach…Although I still never expect to see a statue of Sherman in Georgia.

Virginia’s 204 confederate Monuments and Memorials

Symbols of the Confederacy still dot the South

Highest density

Virginia, the birthplace of Robert E. Lee, is home to more than 220 Confederate symbols, including three military bases named for Confederate war heroes. Texas and Georgia have the second- and third-most symbols, at 178 and 163, respectively.

confederate Monuments in the US

Schools

109 public schools are named for Confederate icons, including Gens. Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and J.E.B. Stuart, and the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis. Of these schools, nearly 25 percent have a student body that is primarily black, while almost a tenth of the schools have a student body that is more than 90 percent black.

Monuments and statues

Of the more than 700 statues and monuments, more than 25 percent are located in Virginia and Georgia alone. Texas, South Carolina, Alabama and Mississippi combined make up an additional 30 percent. Nearly 77 percent were built or dedicated before 1950, while 6 percent were built or rededicated during the era of the civil rights movement. Four percent were built or rededicated after the year 2000.

Roads, highways and bridges

From General Lee Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, to Jefferson Davis Highway in San Diego, California, nearly 500 roads, highways and bridges memorialize the Confederacy.

Counties and cities

There are 80 counties and cities named for Confederates, including Fort Davis, Texas, and Lee County, North Carolina, among others.

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By Any Means Necessary…Take ’em Down

Cities and municipalities have tried to reach some common ground on the removal of confederate statues from public spaces – by allowing them on private ground.

That, as we saw in Charlottesville isn’t working out.

So… Cut to the chase. Take them down permanently with a sledgehammer or wrecking ball.

 

 

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“A Better Deal”… For Whom?

Centrist Democrats keep cutting off the Progressive side of their Party, and then whimpering when they lose. As if becoming white-right lite is going to make them competitive in a race where they have lost their key majorities.

 
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Posted by on August 11, 2017 in Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

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And You Thought Michael Jackson Had Moves

His real name was James Isaac Moore but he adopted the stage name Slim Harpo. Just a shade behind Lightnin’ Slim in local popularity, Harpo played both guitar and neck-rack harmonica in a more down-home approximation of Jimmy Reed, with a few discernible, and distinctive, differences. Harpo‘s music was certainly more laid-back than Reed‘s, if such a notion was possible. But the rhythm was insistent and, overall, Harpo was more adaptable than Reed or most other bluesmen. His material not only made the national charts, but also proved to be quite adaptable for white artists on both sides of the Atlantic, Moore never really dedicated his life full-time to music, he owned and operated a successful trucking business in the 60’s, even while several of his songs took off and made the charts. His style was called the electric swamp blues and included elements of Delta Blues, swamp rock, and Country and Western.

Elmore James was born Elmore Brooks in Richland, Holmes County, Mississippi, the illegitimate son of 15-year-old Leola Brooks, a field hand. His father was probably Joe Willie “Frost” James, who moved in with Leola, and Elmore took his surname. He began making music at the age of 12, using a simple one-string instrument (diddley bow, or jitterbug) strung on a shack wall. As a teen he performed at dances under the names Cleanhead and Joe Willie James.During World War II, James joined the United States Navy, was promoted to coxswain and took part in the invasion of Guam. Upon his discharge, he returned to central Mississippi and settled in the town of Canton with his adopted brother Robert Holston. Working in Holston’s electrical shop, he devised his unique electric sound, using parts from the shop and an unusual placement of two DeArmond pickups

He is known as the King of the Slide Guitar.

And last but not least – Sonny Boy Williamson -He first recorded with Elmore James on “Dust My Broom“. Some of his popular songs include “Don’t Start Me Talkin’“, “Help Me“, “Checkin’ Up on My Baby“, and “Bring It On Home“. He toured Europe with the American Folk Blues Festival and recorded with English rock musicians, including the Yardbirds, the Animals, and Jimmy Page. “Help Me” became a blues standard.

 

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2017 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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Michael Twitty – African-American Food Historian

I have written about Michael Twitty before, and his explorations into African-American slave cuisine, and how it impacted what Americans eat, even today.

He has written a new book about the road he travelled – The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South

Michael now works in Colonial Williamsburg, where the demonstrates not only the cuisine, but the methodology the slaves used to raise and prepare it.

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2017 in Black History

 

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White Woman Who Cried Rape Falsely – Gets Charged With Felonies

Lot of bad history in America from this type of person….

White woman who lied about being raped by three black men indicted on felony charges

A Texas woman who lied about being raped by three masked black men was indicted on three felony charges including two third-degree felony counts of tampering with physical evidence and a third-degree felony count of tampering with a government record, the Root reports.

On March 21, Breana Harmon Talbott—who was 18 at the time—ran into a Texas church in just her bra, a T-shirt and underwear, and claimed she had been raped by two masked men while a third held her down. She was taken to local hospital where it was determined she showed no signs of forced penetration. Harmon eventually admitted her injuries were self-inflicted.

Doing the Perp Pose

In a statement released the following day, Denison County Police called Harmon’s accusation a “hoax.”

“The so-called victim in the case confessed to the hoax last evening (March 21) to a member of the investigative team working the case,” Denison Police Chief Jay Burch said. “Talbott’s hoax was also insulting to our community and especially offensive to the African-American community due to her description of the so-called suspects in her hoax.”

“[Breanna Harmon Talbott] was originally arrested for the misdemeanor offense of false report to a peace officer,” Grayson County District Attorney Joe Brown said Wednesday. “However, the more we have looked at what happened in this case, and considered the harm it caused, and certainly could have caused, we believe what she did fits these higher charges. What she did was very serious, and we believe it was felony conduct.”

If convicted, Harmon faces up to 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine for each felony. The Denison Police Department is also seeking $8,000 in restitution.

 
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Posted by on July 28, 2017 in The Definition of Racism

 

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I’ll Play the Blues For You

Just because it’s Thursday – The Blues in different generations

Ain’t no Love in the Heart of the City –

Little Milton – Make Me Cry

Albert Collins – If Trouble Was Money-

Otis Rush –

Non-electric blues – Lightnin Hopkins for the early 60’s –

From the early 50’s – Son House –

And Mississippi John Hurt – “Cocaine Blues”

And lastly at the edge of R&B – Howling Wolf

 
 

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