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The Chumph Continues Ethnic Cleansing

First he came for the Haitians…

 

With Salvador decision, Trump’s immigration policy veers into white nationalism

Trump moves toward deporting 200,000 longtime immigrants from El Salvador — and, no, they’re not “illegal”

Since Donald Trump kicked off his presidential campaign in 2015 by declaring that Mexican immigrants to the United States are “rapists” and are “bringing crime,” he and his supporters have tried to deny that his opinions on immigration are shaped by racism. Instead, they’ve tried to argue that it’s only illegal immigration that Trump opposes. Trump has even claimed that his proposed wall on the Mexican border would have a “big, very beautiful door because we want the legals to come back into the country.”

Once Trump was in office, however, it became clear that his immigration policy would primarily be shaped around ejecting as many nonwhite, non-English-speaking people as possible. The White House has systematically targeted certain groups of  immigrants who have legal status for deportation, through the travel ban placed on Muslim countries (which initially applied to green card holders), rescinding protections for DACA recipients and more recently the targeted attacks on immigrants with Temporary Protected Status (TPS), who are allowed to live in the United States under a law signed by George H.W. Bush in 1991.

On Monday, the Trump administration revoked TPS from 200,000 Salvadorans, a group of people that has lived and worked here for 17 years, and in many cases have children who know no other home but the United States. This is the biggest move yet to give lie to the notion that Trump is fine with legal immigration. Instead, it’s becoming apparent that a lightly veiled version white nationalism is the guiding ideology behind Trump immigration policies. Earlier, Trump has revoked TPS from 2,500 Nicaraguans and 60,000 Haitians.

“Over the 17 years that they’ve had TPS, they have been routinely and regularly vetted by the government,” explained Royce Murray of the American Immigration Council, during a Monday press call. “They’ve been vetted 11 times, submitted to background checks and security checks to ensure that they do not present any public safety concerns.”

“I kind of see it as low-hanging fruit,” said Mark Drury, an executive at Shapiro & Duncan, a construction company that employs a number of TPS workers. He noted that undocumented workers “are a lot harder to find” than people who have legal status, after all, and that kicking out people who have “done all the right things” is a much easier task for the Trump administration.

“All my plans for the future just ended,” said Christian Chavez Guevara, who has lived in the U.S. with TPS status for 17 years. Holding back tears, he added, “I don’t want to take my daughter, none of my kids, to a violent environment.”

Salvadoran immigrants were given protected status after an earthquake in 2001, but as Chavez Guevara’s statements make clear, the more pressing concerns in 2018 are economic instability and crime. Right now, the State Department has a travel warning in place for El Salvador, noting the country “has one of the highest homicide levels in the world and crimes such as extortion, assault and robbery are common.” But the Trump administration declined to take those facts into consideration, simply declaring that enough time had passed since the earthquake that it was safe for these immigrants to return home.

Frank Mora of the Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center strongly disagreed, arguing that returning all these people to El Salvador “stokes the conditions that actually trigger the instability, the violence and the migration from El Salvador to the United States,” which runs directly counter to the Trump administration’s stated goals.

Remittances — money sent by immigrants back to family and friends in El Salvador — make up 17 percent of that nation’s GDP. Sending all those people back to El Salvador and cutting off that source of income, Mora warned, would exacerbate economic insecurity and likely lead to an escalation of crime. In turn, that will cause more people to leave the country and enter the United States without documentation.

Unsurprisingly, Neil Munro at Breitbart applauded Trump’s decision by characterizing immigrants, en masse, as parasites.

“Four million Americans turn 18 each year and begin looking for good jobs in the free market,” Munro writes. “But the federal government inflates the supply of new labor by annually accepting more than 1 million new legal immigrants, by providing work-permits to roughly 3 million resident foreigners, and by doing little to block the employment of roughly 8 million illegal immigrants.”

Drury begged to differ, saying, “Construction’s at full employment. There are not people sitting at home waiting to take the jobs that these folks are doing. We work hard every day trying to get more people into our industry.”

He added that these potential deportations mean that “El Salvador will get a better prepared work force arriving at their doors,” since most of these people have been building up work experience in the U.S. for years. These workers may well displace less experienced workers in El Salvador, he said, who may well come to the U.S. looking for work, likely as undocumented immigrants.

Attempts to make this debate about economics are best understood as a cover story for a racist agenda. As Matt Yglesias explained at Vox in April, “there is a fairly firm consensus that immigration raises incomes on average for native-born workers” and that inviting immigrants is an effective “strategy for national growth and national greatness.”

Trump and his supporters are clearly motivated by an urge toward ethnic cleansing, whether or not they clearly see it that way, and their economic arguments should be understood as a form of rationalization. The comment section at Breitbart News, full of racial slurs about “anchor babies” and “criminal invaders,” and claims that liberals want the United States to be a “Third World spillway,” make that clear enough. This is why it’s foolish for any liberal to hope the MAGA-hat crowd will turn on Trump after realizing he has broken his promises on taxes, jobs and health care. Mostly they voted for him so he would stick it to people of color, and that is one promise Trump has kept.

 

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Chumph’s Ethnic Cleansing of Black Immigrants

The Chumph’s white supremacy and making America white again….Driving While Black, long a method to harass and intimidate the American born black population,  is used as an excuse to forcibly deport supposedly “illegal aliens” who are black, under a system of trumped up laws and regulations designed to rid the country of it’s immigrant black population.

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The ‘Double Punishment’ For Black Undocumented Immigrants

Although only 7 percent of non-citizens in the U.S. are black, they make up 20 percent of those facing deportation on criminal grounds.

If it were not for the Canadian leaf tattoo on his wrist, Chris Gustave may not be behind bars.

In October, 24 year old Gustave was staying at a weekly motel in Phoenix when police arrived searching for his friend, who had violated parole. At first, “all the attention was on him,” Gustave told me in a phone interview last month. But then, Gustave claimed, an officer noticed the tattoo. “The dude just asked if I was Canadian, the next thing I knew I was in here”—“here” being the remote and sprawling Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Eloy, Arizona.

Gustave is one of more than half a million black unauthorized immigrants in the United States—about 575,000 as of 2013. Last week, The New York Times reported that the presence of immigrants from Haiti and Nigeria, who together represent roughly 20 percent of the foreign-born black population, vexed president Trump. The Haitians “all have AIDS,” Trump said in a June meeting with his top advisors according to the Times, while the Nigerians would not “go back to their huts” after seeing America, he said. (The White House denied the comments.)

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Research suggests that because black people in the United States are more likely to be stopped, arrested, and incarcerated, black immigrants may be disproportionately vulnerable to deportation. The criminal-justice system acts like a “funnel” into the immigration system, said César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, a University of Denver law professor who studies the nexus of policing and immigration law. New York University law professor Alina Das said black immigrants are “targeted by criminalization.”

While the Obama administration prioritized immigrants with felony convictions for deportation, President Trump’s executive orders effectively made anyone in the country illegally a target for removal. Arrests of non-criminals more than doubled, and among those who have been charged with a crime, the top three categories are “traffic offenses – DUI,” “dangerous drugs,” and “immigration,” which means illegal entry, illegal reentry, false claim to US citizenship, and trafficking, according to ICE. In fiscal year 2017, almost 74 percent of people arrested by ICE had a criminal conviction—arrests the agency uses to argue “that its officers know how to prioritize enforcement without overly prescriptive mandates.”

But Hernández sees something different in the large number of criminal convictions among ICE detainees. “Racial bias present in the criminal-justice system plays itself out in the immigration context,” he said. “There are so many entry points” to deportation, said Das, “when you are a person of color who is also an immigrant, you face a double punishment.”

2016 report by the NYU Immigrant Rights Clinic, where Das is the co-director, and the Black Alliance for Just Immigration found that although black immigrants represent about 7 percent of the non-citizen population, they make up more than 10 percent of immigrants in removal proceedings. Criminal convictions amplify the disparity: Twenty percent of immigrants facing deportation on criminal grounds are black.

Today, almost 10 percent of the black population in the United States is foreign-born, up from about 3 percent in 1980. As the number of black immigrants has grown, so, too, have the linkages between cops, courts, and the immigration system.

Aside from ICE’s splashier arrests within so-called “sanctuary cities,” most apprehensions nationwide happen inside jails once an immigrant has had contact with local police. This collaboration is a result of decades of legislation and executive action by both Democrats and Republicans. Two years after the passage of his controversial crime bill, former President Bill Clinton signed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act in 1996. Known as IIRIRA (pronounced “ira-ira”), the law expanded mandatory detention and the number of deportable crimes. As the federal inmate population doubled, prison-like immigrant-detention centers rose up in tandem. In the early 1990s, there were around 5,000 immigrants detained each day; by 2001, the populationquadrupled. And the Trump administration wants to keep that number growing: The president’s 2018 budget called for increasing the daily detainee population to 51,000, a 25 percent bump over last year.

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“Additional detention space does make Americans safer,”argued Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies, a group that advocates for stricter enforcement. Detention also ensures that undocumented immigrants don’t “disappear into the woodwork,” Vaughan said. “The benefit of keeping illegal aliens in custody,” she said, is that “it prevents the release of criminal aliens back into the community to have the opportunity to re-offend.”

While the prison population has begun to dwindle in recent years—the incarceration rate fell 13 percent between 2007 and 2015—immigration detention remains “one of the fastest-growing sectors of the carceral state,” said Kelly Lytle Hernandez, a University of California, Los Angeles, historian who studies the origins of U.S. immigration control.

ICE’s Secure Communities program—which began under former President George W. Bush; was expanded, then killed, under his successor Barack Obama; then reinstated by Trump—provides local police with a national fingerprint database to check suspects for immigration violations. ICE can also deputize local law enforcement to make immigration arrests, a power authorized by IIRIRA. Some 60 law-enforcement agencies across 18 states participate in that program.

“Local police are some of the biggest feeders into the immigration-enforcement system,” said Will Gaona, the policy director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona. “And that’s more true in Arizona”—where Gustave was picked up—“because of S.B. 1070.” That 2010 state law, which has since been emulated in dozens of states, requires police to ask about immigration status if they suspect someone is in the country illegally….

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Conservative Media’s Kristallnacht in America

FOX News and other right wing racist media now use fake news propaganda to incite neo-Nazi and white supremacist thugs into violence against minority individuals and families.

Who is going to hold the scumbags responsible? They are responsible for thousands of hate crimes since the election.

Perhaps some folks need to consider how to make fake right wing news a little less profitable…

Jewish Family Leaves Town After Conservative Media Blames Them For Christmas Play Cancellation

The school says it absolutely did not cancel the production because of religious complaints.

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A Jewish family in Pennsylvania has pulled their child out of school and left town after media outlets across the country ran stories blaming them for the cancellation of a Christmas play.

Local station WHTM reported last week that Centerville Elementary School in Lancaster decided not to put on its production of “A Christmas Carol” this year after two parents complained to the them about the famous line, “God bless us, everyone.” The school had been doing the play for more than 40 years.

But the controversy really took off after conservative outlets including Fox News, Breitbart News and The Blaze picked up the report and gave it national attention.

WHTM said school officials told the news outlet the play was not cancelled because of complaints about that line, although “many parents” believed it was so.

The Fox News commentary piece framed the controversy as part of the so-called “War on Christmas.” “[T]his year, I’m afraid Tiny Tim’s goose has been cooked by the Ghost of Christmas Intolerance,” the article stated.

But the Hempfield School District has vehemently denied this account of why it cancelled the play, and a Jewish family that says it’s being blamed for the controversy is so afraid for their safety they have left the area, at least temporarily. The earlier articles did not identify the parents being blamed as Jewish or identify them by name.

The parents of a fifth grader in the district told LancasterOnline that they never asked for the play to be cancelled or complained about it; they simply asked for their child to be excused and were told that was fine.

But they said since the school announced the cancellation last month, classmates had harassed their child. And after the story broke nationally, the school said it received at least 200 phone calls and emails about the play.

The family said they were disturbed by some of the comments on the conservative outlets’ stories ― including one on the Breitbart story asking for information about the family’s address.

And after a fake news story created an uproar over a pizza place in Washington, D.C. ― which ultimately resulted in a man coming in with an assault rifle to “self-investigate” whether there truly was a child sex ring there ― the family said they didn’t want to risk their safety by sticking around, although they were hoping to be able to come back.

“There’s no way we’re going to take a chance after the pizza incident,” said the parents, who were not named by LancasterOnline.

The Hempfield School District has backed up the family’s account. Officials have posted an FAQ sheet on its website and said the play was absolutely not cancelled because of complaints over the “God bless us” line. Instead, they dropped it because it consumed too much instructional time in the classroom. From the FAQ sheet:

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Protecting Personal Privacy During the Trump Reich

Anyone opposing the Chumph – if he survives the next 45 days to actually become President, is going to need some personal protection against the FBI searching your computes, phones, and other electronic devices as, under Comey they become the Chumph’s Gestapo. The FBI just gained substantial power to mass search electronic devices under a new Legislative change called Rule 41,

What this means is that if the Chumph declares any group or organization a conspiracy – the FBI can search all computers and electronic devices which anyone has used to communicate within, or outside the group to the group. If you send a Tweet to Black Lives Matter, under the Chumph the FBI would gain the ability and authority to search every one of your electronic devices.

So, it is up to you to protect yourselves. This article gives good advice on many openly commercial ways with which to protect from FBI spying. If you are planning anything more active than a small, nonviolent protest march – instead of active participation in BLM, or more active types of resistance, I’d suggest you find your way over onto the Darknet where there are some very good tools. Suggest you also investigate and acquire a system called Blockchain. Blockchain secures information between “trusted” computers. The commercial version is definitely hack-able by NSA, because the NSA forces us developers to put “back doors” into commercial software for them to spy.  The stuff found on the Darknet isn’t “commercial” and is designed to defeat even high level spying.

Remember, there is no such thing as an un-hackable system. It really just boils down to the cost and resources required  to break any system. Which is why the Military frequently changes really critical systems. With the Chumph being Putin’s bitch, the Russians will be given free rein to invade systems on his behalf. They are a lot more sophisticated and capable enemy than anything the FBI can do.

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One of the FBIs Control Centers. Remember, under Comey and Putin’s bitch – these guys no longer work for you.

Protect your privacy during Trump’s reign: A hacker’s guide to being cyber-safe

Protecting individual privacy from government intrusion is older than American democracy

Protecting individual privacy from government intrusion is older than American democracy. In 1604, the attorney general of England, Sir Edward Coke, ruled that a man’s house is his castle. This was the official declaration that a homeowner could protect himself and his privacy from the king’s agents. That lesson carried into today’s America, thanks to our Founding Fathers’ abhorrence for imperialist Great Britain’s unwarranted search and seizure of personal documents.

They understood that everyone has something to hide, because human dignity and intimacy don’t exist if we can’t keep our thoughts and actions private. As citizens in the digital age, that is much more difficult. Malicious hackers and governments can monitor the most private communications, browsing habits and other data breadcrumbs of anyone who owns a smartphone, tablet, laptop or personal computer.

President-elect Donald Trump’s criticism of encryption technology and interest in expanding government surveillance have technologists and civil libertarians deeply concerned.

As an ethical hacker, my job is to help protect those who are unable, or lack the knowledge, to help themselves. People who think like hackers have some really good ideas about how to protect digital privacy during turbulent times. Here’s what they — and I — advise, and why. I have no affiliation or relationship with any of the companies listed below, except in some cases as a regular user.

Phone calls, text messaging and email

When you’re communicating with people, you probably want to be sure only you and they can read what’s being said. That means you need what is called “end-to-end encryption,” in which your message is transmitted as encoded text. As it passes through intermediate systems, like an email network or a cellphone company’s computers, all they can see is the encrypted message. When it arrives at its destination, that person’s phone or computer decrypts the message for reading only by its intended recipient.

For phone calls and private text-message-like communication, the best apps on the market are WhatsApp and Signal. Both use end-to-end encryption and are free apps available for iOS and Android. In order for the encryption to work, both parties need to use the same app.

For private email, Tutanota and ProtonMail lead the pack in my opinion. Both of these Gmail-style email services use end-to-end encryption, and store only encrypted messages on their servers. Keep in mind that if you send emails to people not using a secure service, the emails may not be encrypted. At present, neither service supports PGP/GPG encryption, which could allow security to extend to other email services, but they are reportedly working on it. Both services are also free and based in countries with strong privacy laws (Germany and Switzerland). Both can be used on PCs and mobile devices. My biggest gripe is that neither yet offers two-factor authentication for additional login security.

Avoiding being tracked

It is less straightforward to privately browse the internet or use internet-connected apps and programs. Internet sites and services are complicated business, often involving loading information from many different online sources. For example, a news site might serve the text of the article from one computer, photos from another, related video from a third. And it would connect with Facebook and Twitter to allow readers to share articles and comment on them. Advertising and other services also get involved, allowing site owners to track how much time users spend on the site (among other data).

The easiest way to protect your privacy without totally changing your surfing experience is to install a small piece of free software called a “browser extension.” These add functionality to your existing web browsing program, such as Chrome, Firefox or Safari. The two privacy browser extensions that I recommend are uBlock Origin and Privacy Badger. Both are free, work with the most common web browsers and block sites from tracking your visits.

Encrypting all your online activity

If you want to be more secure, you need to ensure people can’t directly watch the internet traffic from your phone or computer. That’s where a virtual private network (VPN) can help. Simply put, a VPN is a collection of networked computers through which you send your internet traffic.

Instead of the normal online activity of your computer directly contacting a website with open communication, your computer creates an encrypted connection with another computer somewhere else (even in another country). That computer sends out the request on your behalf. When it receives a response – the webpage you’ve asked to load — it encrypts the information and sends it back to your computer, where it’s displayed. This all happens in milliseconds, so in most cases it’s not noticeably slower than regular browsing — and is far more secure.

For the simplest approach to private web browsing, I recommend Freedome by F-Secure because it’s only a few dollars a month, incredibly easy to use and works on computers and mobile devices. There are other VPN services out there, but they are much more complicated and would probably confuse your less technically inclined family members.

Additional tips and tricks

If you don’t want anyone to know what information you’re searching for online, use DuckDuckGo or F-Secure Safe Search. DuckDuckGo is a search engine that doesn’t profile its users or record their search queries. F-Secure Safe Search is not as privacy-friendly because it’s a collaborative effort with Google, but it provides a safety rating for each search result, making it a suitable search engine for children.

To add security to your email, social media and other online accounts, enable what is called “two-factor authentication,” or “2FA.” This requires not only a user name and password, but also another piece of information — like a numeric code sent to your phone — before allowing you to log in successfully. Most common services, like Google and Facebook, now support 2FA. Use it.

Encrypt the data on your phone and your computer to protect your files, pictures and other media. Both Apple iOS and Android have settings options to encrypt your mobile device.

And the last line of privacy defense is you. Only give out your personal information if it is necessary. When signing up for accounts online, do not use your primary email address or real phone number. Instead, create a throw-away email address and get a Google Voice number. That way, when the vendor gets hacked, your real data aren’t breached.

 
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Posted by on December 12, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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The American Gestapo

Most law enforcement organizations, at last in first world countries cling tightly to their non-political, non-partisan, and neural image. As well as that of being even-haded and fair. The reason being quite simply – trust.. As we have seen in some of the cases of Murder-by-Cop of black men – It doesn’t always work out that way No system is perfect.

The FBI massively violated that rule in supporting Trump during the election.

The release of information relative to Hillary Clinton’s emails was not only false

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The FBI Is About To Get The Power To Hack Millions Of Computers

Congress had six months to debate granting President-elect Donald Trump’s FBI new legal powers to hack millions of computers, and Republican leaders objected to doing so on Wednesday.

That means that starting Thursday, a Department of Justice official will be able to go to a single judge, assert that a computer crime may involve millions of networked devices, and get a warrant that lets the FBI hack all of those devices.

According to three senators who tried to put the brakes on that new authority Wednesday so Congress could at least discuss it, there are no concrete assurances from law enforcement officials that privacy won’t be violated or that devices won’t be damaged. Nor was there any explanation of how authorities will hack Americans’ wired equipment.

“At midnight tonight, this Senate will make one of the biggest mistakes in surveillance policy in years and years,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), who tried with Sens. Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.) to offer three measures to delay or rein in the new FBI powers. “Without a single congressional hearing, without a shred of meaningful public input, without any opportunity for senators to ask their questions in a public forum, one judge with one warrant would be able to authorize the hacking of thousands, possibly
millions of devices, cell phones and tablets.”

In fact, very few Americans have any idea that the scope of online search warrants is about to get much broader. The push for the expansion stems from a case in Texas in which investigators were denied a warrant because they could not show that the computer they wanted to hack was in the federal district where the warrant was sought.

That prompted a long review by court officials of what’s known as Rule 41, a part of federal criminal procedure that defines search and seizure rules. They ultimately sent a proposal to the Supreme Court to expand the scope of the surveillance powers. The high court approved the expansion, and by law, Congress had six months to review and approve the change. The six months expire Dec. 1.

When Wyden and the two other senators asked for unanimous consent to bring up various measures to modify the new rules or just delay them for six more months, Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) objected.

He said the changes were common-sense steps designed to allow law enforcement officials the ability to pursue new threats in the rapidly changing online world.

“There is a challenge when cybercriminals use the internet and social media to prey on innocent children, to traffic in human beings, to buy and sell drugs,” Cornyn said. “There has to be a way for law enforcement, for the federal government, to get a search warrant approved by a judge based on a showing of probable cause to be able to get that evidence so that the law can be enforced and these cybercriminals can be prosecuted.”

Wyden and the others do not dispute that criminals exploit all sorts of online devices ― from cameras to computers and connected appliances ― to commit crimes in ever-evolving ways.

But Wyden argued that the new powers are far too vague, and there are inadequate protections for innocent Americans whose property could be hacked legally by the feds if officials assert it is “damaged” by malware of some sort that may have been used in a crime.

He raised the specter of a mass FBI hack going wrong, and perhaps further damaging victims of a criminal hack, or even knocking vital systems offline, such as hospital computer networks.

“Legislators and the public know next to nothing about how the government
conducts the searches,” Wyden said. “The government itself is planning to use software that has not been properly vetted by outside security experts.”

The Oregon senator and a couple of dozen others have written to the Department of Justice about those and other concerns, but did not find the answers persuasive. (Read the exchanges here.)

Wyden predicted that when something inevitably goes wrong, the anger will be aimed a lawmakers who couldn’t be bothered to add checks on the new powers.

“I think when Americans find out that the Congress allowed the Justice Department to just wave its arms in the air and grant itself new powers under the Fourth Amendment without the Senate even being part of a single hearing, I think law-abiding Americans are going to ask, ‘So what were you people in the Senate thinking?’” Wyden said. “What were you thinking about when the FBI starts hacking the victims of a hack, or when a mass hack goes awry and breaks their device, or an entire hospital system in effect has great damage done?”

 

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Trump Concentration Camps

Here we go sliding into Nazi America.

“Internment Camps”…Concentration Camps.

Pro-Donald Trump spokesman praises Muslim registry, cites Japanese internment camps as ‘precedent’

A spokesman for a pro-Trump Super PAC cited the human rights-abusing Japanese internment camps kept in the U.S. during World War II as “precedent” for the President-elect’s proposed Muslim registry system.

Carl Higbie, a former Navy SEAL and a representative for the Great America PAC, told Fox News’ Megyn Kelly Wednesday that he was in favor of the registry, even though it has been rebuked for being modeled after the highly controversial National Security Entry-Exit Registration System put in place after the 9/11 attacks.

“You don’t care that there’ll be some sort of a slippery slope where Muslims may get lumped into some group, and some aggressive law enforcement actor in the future might abuse that list?” Kelly asked.

“We’ve done it based on race, we’ve done it based on religion, we’ve done it based on region,” Higbie responded. “We’ve done it with Iran back — back a while ago. We did it during World War II with Japanese.”

“We’ve done it based on race, we’ve done it based on religion, we’ve done it based on region,” Higbie responded. “We’ve done it with Iran back — back a while ago. We did it during World War II with Japanese.”

In December, Trump praised Roosevelt for erecting the controversial camps and argued that his proposed Muslim registry follows the same thought trajectory.

 

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Yet Another Chump Supporter Violent Attack

More violence from the Chumph Gestapo…

 

 
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Posted by on November 15, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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