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Lynching…Not Just Black Folks

Mobs in the South also occasionally lynched Jews. The most infamous case being that of Leo Frank, who was lynched purportedly for murdering a 13 year old white girl at the Factory which he managed. Didn’t really matter whether Frank was guilty…He was different.

A century after Jewish man’s lynching, Georgia town unsettled

Down past the Big Chicken, the 56-foot-high, steel-beaked beacon of extra crispy that may be this town’s most prized landmark, the wedge of dirt hard by Interstate 75 is notable only for its lack of notability. Stopping here, Rabbi Steven Lebow leaves the engine running and car door open.

Nearly ever since the South Florida native came to this Atlanta suburb three decades ago, this spot – or, more specifically, the tale of murder and vengeance that has stained its ground and local history for 100 years – has weighed on him.

But with transportation crews readying to build over the place where Marietta’s leading citizens lynched a Jewish factory superintendent namedLeo Frank a century ago, Lebow talks only of what’s worth preserving.

“There’s nothing to see here,” Lebow says. “That’s why we need to be the memory.”

As this community prepares to revisit that tale, though, there are reminders that it remains unsettled as well as unsettling.

In 1913, Frank was convicted of murdering 13-year-old Mary Phagan, who worked in his Atlanta factory. The case, charged with race, religion, sex and class, exploded in a national media frenzy. When Georgia’s governor commuted Frank’s death sentence, citizens took matters in their own hands.

The case established the Anti-Defamation League as the country’s most outspoken opponent of anti-Semitism. It also fueled the rebirth of the Ku Klux Klan.

Until ADL lawyers pressed officials to posthumously pardon Frank in the 1980s, the case was hushed in Atlanta’s synagogues, the homes of Old Marietta, and among Phagan’s descendants.

Though granted, the pardon was less than conclusive. Now, in a summer that has seen Southerners wrangle with the best-known symbol of the region’s embattled past, Lebow and others want to re-open a chapter some would prefer to let be.

But their effort to right history, as they see it, has renewed charges that, in doing so, they are unfairly trying to rewrite it…

Frank, raised in New York, ran a factory in industrializing Atlanta. In 1913, Phagan, her hair in bows, stopped to collect her pay.

That night, a watchman found her bloodied body in the basement. Police arrested several men before settling on Frank, who proclaimed his innocence. His conviction rested on the testimony of a custodian, Jim Conley, a rare case of a black man’s word used against a white defendant.

Frank’s lawyers appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, arguing that a climate of anti-Semitism had resulted in an unfair trial. The court upheld the verdict, 7-2. In 1915, Gov. John Slaton commuted Frank’s sentence to life. A furious crowd hanged the politician in effigy.

Months later, a group of Marietta men took Frank from prison. On Aug. 17, they hanged him outside town. Nobody was ever charged.

“The Frank case was like a lightning strike,” says Steve Oney, who wrote “And the Dead Shall Rise,” a 2002 book on the case. “Everything in the South stood briefly in relief and then it was dark again.”… More

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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More American Right Wing Whackjob Terrorists Caught

The biggest danger from terrorism in this country is from Domestic terrorism.  In today’s political climate that in vast majority means right wing terrorism, wherein Militias and various fringe groups look to kill their fellow Americans.

The weird thing about this one… Is these guys should be old enough to know better.

Now, one of the questions is what (if any) connection is between these guys and the “Oath Keepers“, one of whom was convicted last week for a disrupted terrorist attack on a Courthouse?

Tea Party darlings, all…

Four North Georgia men arrested in alleged covert militia plot

Another pack of McVeigh Wannabes?

Four North Georgia men accused of being members of a fringe militia group were arrested Tuesday by federal authorities for planning to make the deadly toxin ricin and obtain explosives, federal authorities said.

Authorities said that, beginning in March, the men held clandestine militia meetings and discussed using toxic agents and assassinations in an effort to undermine federal and state government and advance their interests.

The four men taken into federal custody are: Frederick Thomas, 73, of Cleveland, and Toccoa residents Dan Roberts, 67; Ray H. Adams, 65; and Samuel J. Crump, 68. They are charged with

“These defendants, who are alleged to be part of a fringe militia group, are charged with planning attacks against their own fellow citizens and government,” U.S. Attorney Sally Yates said. “To carry out their agenda, two of the defendants allegedly purchased purported explosives and a silencer, while the other two defendants took steps to attempt to produce a deadly biological toxin.”

According to federal authorities, Thomas, Roberts, Adams and others who attended the meetings discussed targeting various government officials, including employees of the IRS. The meetings were monitored and tape recorded by a confidential source for the FBI, authorities said.

Complaints unsealed Tuesday allege that Roberts knew a man who had manufactured the biological toxin, ricin, and had access to the castor beans used to make it.

During one of the group’s meetings in September, which was recorded by the confidential source, Crump said he would like to make 10 pounds of ricin and disperse it in various U.S. cities, including Atlanta, the complaints said. Crump said ricin could be blown from a car traveling on the interstates.

Ricin can be fatal if inhaled or ingested

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2011 in Domestic terrorism, Stupid Tea Bagger Tricks

 

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On Lynching and the Execution of Troy Davis

The execution of Troy Davis in Georgia has ignited a firestorm of outrage. Davis’ last words were that he was “innocent”.

Not surprising Cash and Carry Uncle Tommie Clarence led the Supreme Court’s decision not to intervene… Proving once again a black defendant can’t get a fair trial or consideration in the courts, whether it is due to racism, politics – or in the case of Thomas…

A need to re-establish his Lawn Ornament bonafides with the conservative people who own him. I am not arguing that Troy Davis’ execution would have been stopped by the court…

Only that were not the Supreme Court corrupt, at least he would have gotten a fair hearing.

The Execution of Troy Davis Provides Another ‘Haunting Reminder of Once Prevalent Southern Lynchings’

“I am innocent,” said Troy Davis, moments before the the state of Georgia put him to death.

The state-sanctioned slaying, which former President Jammy Carter characterized as “a grave miscarriage of justice,” was completed at 11:08 pm EST.

Before the execution, the man whose case inspired an international outcry against not just the death penalty but a dysfunctional “justice” system told the witnesses at the Georgia Diagnostic Prison facility: “The incident that night was not my fault. I did not have a gun.”

Addressing the family of, Mark MacPhail, the off-duty Savannah police officer he was accused of killing, Davis said he was sorry for their loss. Then, he said: “I did not personally kill your son, father and brother. I am innocent.”

To those who battled to save his life, Davis urged continued investigation, inquiry and struggle for justice. “All I can ask… is that you look deeper into this case so that you really can finally see the truth,” he said moments before the execution.

The killing of Davis took place after US Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, a Georgia native, led the High Court in rejecting a plea that the killing be blocked. There were no dissents from the other justices on the current Court.

But it is important to underline the word “current.”

Former Justice John Paul Stevens, who left the High Court last year, has argued in recent statements and interviews that the death penalty is “unconstitutional.”

In particular, he cited evidence confirming that African-Americans who are charged with murder (such as Troy Davis) are dramatically more likely than whites to be executed.

The General Accounting Office has concluded that “in 82 percent of the studies [reviewed], race of the victim was found to influence the likelihood of being charged with capital murder or receiving the death penalty, i.e. those who murdered whites were more likely to be sentenced to death than those who murdered blacks,” while former U.S. Senator Russ Feingold, the long-time chair of the Constutution Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Commitee, has said that: “We simply cannot say we live in a country that offers equal justice to all Americans when racial disparities plague the system by which our society imposes the ultimate punishment.”

The American Civil Liberties Union notes that  “systemic racial bias in the application of the death penalty exists at both the state and federal level,” and it notes historic patterns of discrimination in particular states such as Georgia—highlighting the classic work of University of Iowa law professor David Baldus, who found that during the 1980s prosecutors in Georgia sought the death penalty for 70 percent of African-American defendants with white victims, but for only 15 percent of white defendants with black victims. (Troy Davis’ case traces back to an incident in 1989.)

The patterns of discrimination, noted Justice Stevens, “provides a haunting reminder of once prevalent Southern lynchings.“

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2011 in American Genocide, Domestic terrorism

 

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Two Killings… And a Suicide

Busy night on death row…

Georgia Executes Inmate Troy Davis After Supreme Court Denies Appeal

White Supremacist Executed for Texas Dragging

Oh yeah… And that suicide?

Hewlett-Packard investors like possibility of Meg Whitman as CEO

It just doesn’t get any dumber than that.

 
 

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A Confederate Flag Taken Down… By Neo-confederates

Confederate Flag Art Removed After Complaints

Apparently the guardians of the Southern Myth didn’t like a painting by Gainsville State College, located in Gainsville, Georgia by  Professor Stanley Bermudez. Seems Professor Bermudez made the mistake of painting what he felt when he saw the flag…

Neo-confederate and hate groups promptly voice their ire, intimidating the College to remove the flag from the Art Exhibit.

GSC professor teaches the importance of art as his own work comes under fire

“When I was growing up in South America, we had the freedom of expression in my country. But when Hugo Chávez came into power, he started manipulating that freedom. Everything from the media to art was being censored,” said Bermudez, who is from Venezuela.

“Anyone who made a negative comment about the government … was being attacked or repressed. I don’t agree with that kind of censorship.”

As an artist, Bermudez often takes to canvas to express his feelings and thoughts. One of his most recent works, “Heritage?,” illustrates what comes to his mind when he thinks of the Confederate flag.

The red flag, with the blue St. Andrew’s Cross emblazoned across the front adorned with white stars, was carried onto the battlefield by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. While some people argue that the flag represents Southern heritage and pride, other people — Bermudez included — see it in a less positive light. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2011 in Domestic terrorism, The New Jim Crow

 

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RealClearPolitics – Video – GA Dem: GOP Members Wear “White Sheets” For “Midnight Meeting”

Why don’t you tell us how you really feel, Georgia State Senator Robert Brown?

 

 
 

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Georgia Teacher’s KKK Mistake…

This teacher screwed up – but doesn’t seem to have any nefarious intention. Hopefully she can keep her job after making an apology. Dumb move – but hopefully a learning moment…

Residents attended a meeting Monday about a group of teens dressed at Ku Klux Klan members last week at Lumpkin County High School. Many there said the incident was part of an ongoing racial issue in Lumpkin County. School officials say the incident was part of class history project for which the teacher has been suspended with pay.

Residents attended a meeting Monday about a group of teens dressed at Ku Klux Klan members last week at Lumpkin County High School. Many there said the incident was part of an ongoing racial issue in Lumpkin County. School officials say the incident was part of class history project for which the teacher has been suspended with pay.

Teacher stands by lesson but would keep ‘Klan’ off campus next time

Catherine Ariemma never intended for students to be offended by the sight of four Ku Klux Klansmen at Lumpkin County High School.

But that’s how senior Cody Rider said he felt last Thursday when he looked up and saw the students — dressed in white hoods and sheets — walking through the school cafeteria.

“I was outraged,” the 18-year-old mixed-race student told the AJC Monday night. “I was mad, so I started walking to them.

A coach, Josh Chatham, intervened by grabbing Rider by the arm. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2010 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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