Tag Archives: Football

Story Deepens on Texas Football Players Who Hit Ref

This one has taken a strange twist. Shortly after punishment was announced for the two Texas High Schoolers shown in the shocking video below, one or both of them told the authorities that they had been told to hit the ref by a coach!

Texas coach accused of ordering players to hit referee resigns

Mack Breed, the assistant football coach from John Jay High School in San Antonio, Texas, who is accused of directing two players to target a referee during a game, has resigned, Northside Independent School District Superintendent Brian Woods said Thursday.

Head football coach Gary Gutierrez spoke during the University Interscholastic League hearing, both defending Breed and deriding his “poor judgment call.”

“I love coach Breed. He was on staff already when I became head coach. He is an upstanding man, he is a man of integrity,” Gutierrez said, but “he violated the sanctity of what coaches are” by telling the players to hit a game official.

Breed joined the coaching staff in 2010. He played quarterback at John Jay before attending theUniversity of Missouri, where he played safety. On Thursday, Breed’s lawyer issued the coach’s first public statement on the incident, saying “some people are unfairly blaming one man, Mack Breed, for everything that happened at that game.”

According to Breed’s version of events, after a black John Jay wide receiver was ejected from the game, another black player told Breed that umpire Robert Watts had said to the player, “Throw the f***ing ball at me again, n****r.”

Watts, through his attorneys, has repeatedly denied uttering racial slurs toward the players, says he is considering lawsuits and is urging criminal prosecutions of the assistant coach and the two players.

“As a black male, nothing offended Mack Breed more than being called a racial epithet, except someone in a position of authority calling his players racial epithets. The slur was heard by multiple players, some of whom were not involved in the hit,” Breed’s statement said.

The player that reported hearing the slur was later tossed from the game for throwing a punch even though, according to the statement, a white player on the opposing team had allegedly punched the wide receiver multiple times and avoided ejection.

Describing the atmosphere on the John Jay sideline as “a powder keg,” Breed said that another John Jay coach was penalized for yelling at the officials about the alleged racist comments. Gutierrez also notified the officials about the slurs, according to Breed, but was told the officials wouldn’t use such language.

“Succumbing to the racially charged atmosphere, Coach Breed let his anger get the best of him and he made some regrettable comments. Witnesses can’t agree on what the comments were, but they were interpreted by two players to mean ‘hit the referee.’ The witnesses agree that Breed never explicitly told them to hit the referee, except for Michael Moreno, whose story continues to evolve,” the statement said, referring to one of the two players in question.

Singling out the teen, Breed said “Moreno paints himself as a saint on television” when he was actually “out of control” during the game. Not only did Moreno allegedly allow another player to be ejected for Moreno’s hit on Watts, he flagrantly hit a kneeling quarterback — a no-no in football — on the next play, according to the coach.

“His behavior is exactly what one would expect from a rogue player blaming a coach for the player’s actions,” Breed’s statement said.

Breed concluded his statement by saying he “feels that he could have handled the situation better. For that reason, Mack has submitted his resignation and will move forward taking responsibility for his role in the events that occurred. Mack never intended for the kids to hit or hurt the referee, but the result was the same.”

Jay Downs, an attorney for Watts, took the stand, reiterating another Watts attorney’s assertion that the allegations of racism are false. Watts, who has provided a statement to law enforcement, is suffering from post-concussion syndrome and didn’t attend the hearing, the attorney said. Doctors have yet to clear him to return to refereeing.

News of Breed’s resignation came a day after the players, who intentionally hit an official during a game this month and were suspended from school, attended a disciplinary hearing.

Pascual Gonzalez, a spokesman for the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, said that because Moreno and Victor Rojas are minors, no information about the hearing would be released.

This 1955…or 2015? This racial name calling went on in sports until the late 60’s, when it pretty much ceased due to pressure by the fans, coaches, and leagues who decided not to tolerate it anymore. The only response in the 50’s and early 60’s was to walk away. The coach – in exposing the two boys to punishments is wrong.


Posted by on September 24, 2015 in You Know It's Bad When...


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Concussions Likely Cause of Degenerative Brain Disease in Football Players

This one has been stewing for a while. The league began to take things more seriously a few years ago, banning certain types of hits, and upgrading helmets and rules.

What is terrifying about this though is that even people who played Pop Warner football as kids may suffer this level of brain damage.

New: 87 Deceased NFL Players Test Positive for Brain Disease

A total of 87 out of 91 former NFL players have tested positive for the brain disease at the center of the debate over concussions in football, according to new figures from the nation’s largest brain bank focused on the study of traumatic head injury.

Researchers with the Department of Veterans Affairs and Boston University have now identified the degenerative disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in 96 percent of NFL players that they’ve examined and in 79 percent of all football players. The disease is widely believed to stem from repetitive trauma to the head, and can lead to conditions such as memory loss, depression and dementia.

In total, the lab has found CTE in the brain tissue in 131 out of 165 individuals who, before their deaths, played football either professionally, semi-professionally, in college or in high school.

Forty percent of those who tested positive were the offensive and defensive linemen who come into contact with one another on every play of a game, according to numbers shared by the brain bank with FRONTLINE. That finding supports past research suggesting that it’s the repeat, more minor head trauma that occurs regularly in football that may pose the greatest risk to players, as opposed to just the sometimes violent collisions that cause concussions.

But the figures come with several important caveats, as testing for the disease can be an imperfect process. Brain scans have been used to identify signs of CTE in living players, but the disease can only be definitively identified posthumously. As such, many of the players who have donated their brains for testing suspected that they had the disease while still alive, leaving researchers with a skewed population to work with.

Even with those caveats, the latest numbers are “remarkably consistent” with pastresearch from the center suggesting a link between football and long-term brain disease, said Dr. Ann McKee, the facility’s director and chief of neuropathology at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

“People think that we’re blowing this out of proportion, that this is a very rare disease and that we’re sensationalizing it,” said McKee, who runs the lab as part of a collaboration between the VA and BU. “My response is that where I sit, this is a very real disease. We have had no problem identifying it in hundreds of players.”

In a statement, a spokesman for the NFL said, “We are dedicated to making football safer and continue to take steps to protect players, including rule changes, advanced sideline technology, and expanded medical resources. We continue to make significant investments in independent research through our gifts to Boston University, the [National Institutes of Health] and other efforts to accelerate the science and understanding of these issues.”

The latest update from the brain bank, which in 2010 received a $1 million research grant from the NFL, comes at a time when the league is able to boast measurable progress in reducing head injuries. In its 2015 Health & Safety Report, the NFL said that concussions in regular season games fell 35 percent over the past two seasons, from 173 in 2012 to 112 last season. A separate analysis by FRONTLINE that factors in concussions reported by teams during the preseason and the playoffs shows a smaller decrease of 28 percent.

Off the field, the league has revised safety rules to minimize head-to-head hits, and invested millions into research. In April, it also won final approval for a potential $1 billion settlement with roughly 5,000 former players who have sued it over past head injuries.

Still, at the start of a new season of play, the NFL once again finds itself grappling to turn the page on the central argument in the class-action lawsuit: that for years it sought to conceal a link between football and long-term brain disease.

The latest challenge to that effort came two weeks ago with the trailer for a forthcoming Hollywood film about the neuropathologist who first discovered CTE. When the trailer was released, it quickly went viral, leaving the NFL bracing for a new round of scrutiny over past efforts to deny any such connection.

The film, Concussion, starring Will Smith, traces the story of Bennet Omalu, who in 2005 shocked the football establishment with an article in the journal Neurosurgery detailing his discovery of CTE in the brain of former Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster. At the VA lab and elsewhere, CTE has since been found in players such as Hall of FamerJunior Seau, former NFL Man of the Year Dave Duerson, and Indianapolis Colts tight end John Mackey, a past head of the player’s union.

While the story is not a new one, for the NFL, it represents a high-profile and potentially embarrassing cinematic interpretation of a period in which the league sought to refute research suggesting football may contribute to brain disease.

From 2003 to 2009, for example, the NFL’s now disbanded Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee concluded in a series of scientific papers that “no NFL player” had experienced chronic brain damage from repeat concussions, and that “Professional football players do not sustain frequent repetitive blows to the brain on a regular basis.”

In the case of Omalu, league doctors publicly assailed his research, and in a rare move, demanded a retraction of his study. When Omalu spoke to FRONTLINE about the incident for the 2013 documentary, League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis, he said, “You can’t go against the NFL. They’ll squash you.”

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Posted by on September 19, 2015 in News


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Calling BS on Texas Football Players Who Hit Ref

These kids are so far out of bounds it is ridiculous…

Texas High School Football Players Allege Referee Used Racial Slurs Before Hit

The two Texas high school football players who were suspended on Monday for targeting and hitting a referee are now alleging that the referee directed racial slurs at them prior to the hit, according to The Associated Press.

Speaking to reporters at a press conference on Tuesday afternoon, Northside Independent School District Superintendent Brian T. Woods said that the two players from John Jay High School will have a disciplinary hearing, but the district will also file a complaint about the racial slur to the Texas Association of Sports Officials.

District spokesman Pascual Gonzalez also announced on Tuesday that Mack Breed, an assistant coach on John Jay’s football team, has been placed on administrative leave for his role in the incident. Breed, a 2004 graduate of John Jay, is alleged to have said “this guy needs to pay for cheating us” before his two players made the hit.

The district has condemned Breed’s alleged comments, saying that his “suggestion was inappropriate and could have led to the incident.”

The incident happened last Friday during a game between John Jay High School and Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. With approximately a minute left in the game, two unidentified John Jay players rammed into the referee over a supposed “bad call.” Prior to the hit, two other John Jay players had been ejected from the game on separate plays.

Both players involved in the hit were immediately ejected, as well.

The referee, identified by TexasHSFootball as Robert Watts, has been officiating high school football games for 14 years. Although ESPN reported that Watts was seeking to press charges, Watts told TexasHSFootball that he won’t be rushing into anything.

I like to keep my officiating quiet; unfortunately this will be big news,” Watts said on Monday. “Libel and slander have already been committed against me. I will be contacting the appropriate people soon and any statement from me will come at a later date.”

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Posted by on September 9, 2015 in You Know It's Bad When...


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Neil deGrasse Tyson on racism in Australia

Australia has some problems with race. It isn’t new, and partially stems from a previously monolithic population. The treatment of the Aboriginal population is a historical disgrace.

Neil deGrasse Tyson uses science to destroy the age-old racist “monkey” slur once and for all

Adam Goodes, the Australian rules footballer jeered by crowds for his celebratory Indigenous dancing, became the topic of global conversation this month. Many of these conversations forced Australians to reexamine the country’s race problem, and shortly thereafter, a social media movement under the hashtag #IstandwithAdam was born.

On Monday, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson appeared on a panel for the Australian Broadcasting Association’s Q&A where he was asked to comment on Goodes and race relations today.

Tyson, who said he wasn’t at license to speak for Australia, offered, instead, a “cosmic” perspective on the news story.

“What we do in math is you separate the variables and what’s happening is all the variables are jumbled together and people are reacting but if you separate the variables, it can be revealing,” he said.

Tyson continued:

“For example, he is celebrating his score at the end of a game. Correct? I mean, during the game and he does it in a way that’s different from everyone else gesturally and, to me, that’s a form of freedom of expression, a freedom of speech. If you don’t like that, at some point you have to confess to yourself you’re not a fan of freedom of speech and so if you are going to do that, that’s a different country from what I understand Australia claims to be. That’s A.”

The astrophysicist then addressed an incident that occurred during the AFL’s Indigenous Round in 2013 in which a 13-year-old was escorted from the grounds after calling Goodes an “ape.” Tyson theorized that this was learned behavior — that the girl had likely picked up this slur from “an environment where it’d been said before.”

A recent news story supports Tyson’s theory: The Independent reported Sunday that the mother of the 13-year-old was defending the usage of the racial slur and asking Goodes to apologize for singling out her daughter. She called his behavior “ridiculous.”

“You know what she’s done, she’s selectively chosen things about apes that she thinks apply to him and not other things that would apply to people who are white,” Tyson said. “For example, apes have hair all over their bodies. You have never seen a black person with hair all over their bodies. Black people are some of the least hairiest people in this world! Who are the hairiest? It’s white people! With hair on the back, out of the neck. And so if you focussed on hair then you could call white people monkeys, right. It’s all racist conduct.”

Adam Goodes, Australian Rules footballer. Goodes’ father is of English, Irish and Scottish ancestry; his mother is an Indigenous Australian (Adnyamathanha and Narungga).

For those who have never seen it, this is the Traditional Maori War Dance performed by New Zealanders. This one, involving several hundred soldiers to honor their war dead in Afghanistan. Yeah, I know New Zealand is a different country, but it tells you something about cultural adoption and assimilation…


Posted by on August 4, 2015 in Giant Negros


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Former NFL Player Now Farms for Charity

After my last post on idiots behaving badly on a NYC Subway, it’s easy to lose faith.

Then there is this inspiring story.

Why a star football player traded NFL career for a tractor

LOUISBURG, N.C. – At one point number 60, Jason Brown, was one of the best centers in the NFL.

At one point he had a five-year, $37 million contract with the St. Louis Rams.

And at one point he decided it was all meaningless – and just walked away from football.

“My agent told me, ‘You’re making the biggest mistake of your life,'” said Brown. “And I looked right back at him and I said, ‘No I’m not. No I’m not.'”

So what could possibly trump the NFL?

You wouldn’t believe.

Jason Brown quit football to be a plain, old farmer — even though he’d never farmed a day a in his life.

Asked how he learned to even know what to do, Brown said:

“Get on the Internet. Watch Youtube videos.”

He learned how to farm from Youtube.

Thanks to Youtube and some good advice from other farmers here in Louisburg, N.C., this week Jason finished harvesting his first, a five-acre plot of sweet potatoes.

“When you see them pop up out of the ground, man, it’s the most beautiful thing you could ever see,” said Brown. He said he has never felt more successful.

“Not in man’s standards,” said Brown. “But in God’s eyes.”

But God cares about the NFL, right? There are people praying to him on the field all the time.

“Yeah, there’s a lot of people praying out there,” said Brown. “But, when I think about a life of greatness, I think about a life of service.”

See, his plan for this farm, which he calls “First Fruits Farm,” is to donate the first fruits of every harvest to food pantries. Today it’s all five acres–100,000 pounds–of sweet potatoes.

“It’s unusual for a grower to grow a crop just to give away,” said Rebecca Page, who organizes food collection for the needy. “And that’s what Jason has done. And he’s planning to do more next year.”

Brown has 1,000 acres here, which could go a long way toward eliminating hunger in this neck of North Carolina.

“Love is the most wonderful currency that you can give anyone,” said Brown.

“Are you sure you played in the NFL?” I asked.


“Because I feel like cuddling you right now.”

“Don’t do that!” he said.

Brown may have left the NFL, but apparently holding is still a penalty.

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Posted by on November 18, 2014 in Giant Negros, Men, The Post-Racial Life


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Sportsmanship? Not Anymore at Virginia State

This is one of those things that makes you go WTF!

This one is as bad as the Tonya Harding/Nancy Kerrigan disgrace, where Harding’s husband attempted to disable Kerrigan so she could not compete against Harding in the skating championships.

It may well have been that Harding was guilty of nothing more than exceptionally low standards in terms of the men she married…

So what is the Virginia State Football Players excuse who took on the opposing quarterback in a bathroom at the Championship Banquet… 5-1?

I hope these morons get to spend a few days behind bars to consider their transgressions…And their scholarships revoked as a warning to any  other athlete.

Rudy Johnson, WSSU Quarterback

CIAA championship canceled after Winston-Salem State QB is attacked

Winston-Salem State quarterback Rudy Johnson was expected to lead his team on the field Saturday as it attempts to win its third consecutive Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (CIAA) football championship. But after an alleged incident at a celebratory banquet Friday, Johnson won’t be able to play, and neither will anyone else.

The CIAA on Friday night canceled the game between Winston-Salem State and Virginia State in the wake of the incident, as well as the conference’s volleyball championships that also were to be held in Winston-Salem, N.C., this weekend. The move comes after Johnson was allegedly beaten by a group of Virginia State football players in a bathroom of a WSSU campus building during the CIAA football banquet.

The Winston-Salem Journal obtained an arrest warrant from Winston-Salem State campus police for Lamont Britt, a Virginia State sophomore running back, who was charged with misdemeanor assault inflicting serious injury. According to the Journal, Britt is being held in Forsyth County (N.C.) Jail with bond set at $7,500 and has a date in Forsyth District Court set for Dec. 9.

A voice message and email from USA TODAY Sports to campus police lieutenant and crime prevention officer Henry Gray were not returned.

The university’s associate athletics director for media relations, Kevin Manns, confirmed to USA TODAY Sports that Johnson had been treated and released from a nearby hospital. According to the arrest warrant, Johnson had been hit in the face and head and suffered a head laceration and swollen eye.

In announcing the cancellation, CIAA commissioner Jacquie Carpenter said in a statement, “Our singular focus is on the safety and security of the CIAA’s student-athletes and those who follow them. It is important that everyone involved in the CIAA embody our mission every day by acting as upstanding individuals on and off the field. We must work together to hold each other to higher standards of responsible judgment and conduct because we must demand that if we are to succeed.

“We did not make this decision lightly, as its impact is far and wide – affecting our student-athletes, alumni, fans, sponsors and more. But the CIAA has long had policies to encourage responsible behavior, and must consider what is necessary to assure days like today are not repeated, ever.”

Winston-Salem State Chancellor Donald Reaves said in a statement Friday night, “I am saddened to report that at today’s CIAA pre-championship game luncheon held at the Anderson Center of the WSSU campus that our starting quarterback, Rudy Johnson, was viciously beaten by one or more members of the Virginia State football team.

“There is no excuse for the behavior of the Virginia State players. One suspect has admitted to his role in the attack and has been arrest on criminal assault charges. The University Police Department is attempting to identify the other VSU players who were involved. Today’s event was supposed to be a celebration for both teams and for all the players who were being recognized for an outstanding season. The actions from the Virginia State players certainly changed the outcome for everyone.”

On its university web site, Virginia State released a statement reading, “Virginia State University is aware of an incident involving student athletes from Winston Salem State and Virginia State Universities. VSU officials are fully cooperating with the CIAA in their investigation, and as a result, will not be able to comment any further.”

Johnson, a junior from San Diego who transferred from Texas Southern earlier this year, has led his team to a 9-1 record and was named the CIAA’s first-team quarterback on Wednesday. Winston-Salem State has been ranked as a leading contender for the 2013 NCAA Division II football playoffs after reaching the championship game in 2012.



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Posted by on November 16, 2013 in Domestic terrorism


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Grambling University Football Players Strike Cancels Game

Not sure of the details here – but this is an expensive one for Grambling and Jackson State. They fired Doug WIlliams? Geez!

The team is 0-7 this year, after a 48-0 loss to Alcorn State last week. The team had a 1-11 record in 2012.

Former Coach Doug Williams and Team Mates.

Grambling Football Players Refuse To Travel To Jackson State After Practice Boycott

A Jackson State spokesman has announced that Saturday’s game against Grambling has been canceled.

JSU spokesman Wesley Peterson told The Associated Press Friday that Grambling officials contacted Jackson State to inform the university of the decision.

Disgruntled Grambling players had refused to travel to Mississippi for the game. Grambling spokesman Will Sutton had said earlier in a text to the AP that there would be “no forfeit” and that Grambling officials were trying to determine the next step to take.

Apparently, nothing could be worked out so that the game could be played.

Southwestern Athletic Conference Commissioner Duer Sharp had said before the decision was made not to play that if Grambling does not show for Saturday’s game, it will be forced to forfeit and the school will be fined.

“It’s very disappointing,” Sharp said. “But without knowing all the facts it’s hard for me to make a judgment.”

Friday’s apparent player boycott was the latest in three days of upheaval for Grambling’s proud program. Several media outlets have reported that players did not attend practice on Wednesday and Thursday because of issues with program and school leadership.

Grambling (0-7) has changed coaches twice in about two months. Doug Williams was fired two games into the season and replaced by George Ragsdale, who was reassigned Thursday and replaced by Dennis “Dirt” Winston.

The game is Jackson State’s homecoming and could hurt the school financially. The Grambling-Jackson State matchup usually draws very well — an announced crowd of more than 21,000 attended the game in Jackson in 2011.

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Posted by on October 19, 2013 in Black History, The Post-Racial Life


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