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Malia Obama To Harvard

Nothing unexpected here with both parents being Harvard Grads. Other factors in her favor include that nearly 80% of Sidwell Friends School graduates attend the Ivy League, second only to a Public High School also in the Washington area.

Malia is taking a year off, before attending Harvard, I would guess to be with family in life outside the bubble of the Presidency.

Malia Obama

Malia Obama will take a gap year, then attend Harvard in 2017

Malia Obama will take a gap year after graduating from high school and then attend Harvard University in the fall of 2017, the White House said Sunday, ending speculation at campuses across the country.

Obama, 17, the older of the president’s two daughters, visited more than a dozen schools, including Stanford, Yale and Columbia, before making her decision. The White House did not say what she would spend her gap year doing.

The tall, poised teenager will be one of the most famous members of her class — and a standout for the Secret Service agents who will be in tow.

The older Obama daughter was 10 when her father took the highest office in the land. Now a senior at the elite Sidwell Friends School in northwest Washington, she has come of age with the world watching. Her sister, Sasha, 14, is wrapping up her freshman year at the private school.

Although her grades and standardized test scores remain closely guarded secrets, factors in her favor included her family background, study at top-flight schools and a unique, privileged upbringing that was bound to make for a remarkable college essay.

Her parents, both Harvard Law grads, have four Ivy League degrees between them. First Lady Michelle Obama graduated from Harvard Law in 1988, and her husband followed in 1991. He completed undergraduate studies at Columbia University in 1983. She graduated from Princeton in 1985.

The president, speaking at a Des Moines high school last fall about college access and affordability, said he knew that finding the best school was a “tough process” because his daughter was “going through it right now.”

“You guys are juggling deadlines and applications and personal statements,” he told the audience.

He called his daughter a “hard worker” and said he advised her “not to stress too much about having to get into one particular college.”

He said there were a lot of good schools and “just because it’s not some name-brand, famous, fancy school doesn’t mean that you’re not going to get a great education there.”

The elder Obama child is said to be an aspiring filmmaker. She plays tennis for fun.

She took a look in 2014 at two rival schools in Northern California — Stanford University and UC Berkeley — and later shifted attention to schools on the East Coast.

Media reports show she inspected six of the eight Ivy League schools: Brown, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania and Yale. She also paid stops to New York University, Tufts University, Barnard College and Wesleyan University.

Born in Chicago on July 4, 1998, Malia Obama attended the private University of Chicago Laboratory Schools before she and her family entered the White House in 2009.

The first of the first daughters made headlines in August 2014 when, bicycling with her parents while on vacation in Martha’s Vineyard, she donned a Stanford T-shirt. Some thought her choice was made.

The last two presidential children in the White House, twins Barbara and Jenna Bush, were spared major media scrutiny as they chose their colleges; they already were enrolled by the time their father won the presidency in 2000.

Barbara Bush graduated from Yale and Jenna Bush, the University of Texas at Austin.

During Bill Clinton’s presidency, his daughter, Chelsea, went from Sidwell Friends, a Quaker-affiliated prep school, to Stanford, choosing the place where her friend (and future husband) Marc Mezvinsky already was in attendance.

Chelsea Clinton graduated from Stanford in 2001 and later obtained a master’s degrees and doctorate from Oxford University in England and a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

 

 
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Posted by on May 1, 2016 in Giant Negros

 

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Chicago Twins Accepted to 56 Colleges

Congrats to Shaprice Hunt and her twin brother Deprice Hunt who together have been accepted to a phenomenal 56 Colleges and offered scholarships in total worth $1.6 million.

Shaprice has been accepted into 35 colleges, two of which have offered her a full-ride scholarship while five schools have scouted her to play basketball.

Deprice, who is a youth activist in Chicago, has been accepted into 27 schools. He earned $300,000 in scholarships and received two full scholarship offers.

An Amazing set of twins!

Phenomenal Twins Get Into 56 Colleges, Earn $1.6 Million In Scholarships

Chicago twins Deprice and Shaprice Hunt have set an extremely high bar for other high school seniors. The twins were recently accepted into a combined 56 colleges and have earned about $1.6 million in scholarships.

Kemitashi Austin brought the Hunt siblings’ huge accomplishments to the forefront on Facebook when she shared a screenshot of a conversation between her and Shaprice.

Of the 56 schools, Shaprice has been accepted into 35 colleges, two of which have offered her a full-ride scholarship while five schools have scouted her to play basketball. She told The Huffington Post that she earned $1.3 million in scholarships. Shaprice wants to attend either Illinois State University or Eastern Illinois University and dual major in Education and Psychology.

Deprice, who is a youth activist in Chicago, has been accepted into 27 schools. He earned $300,000 in scholarships and received two full scholarship offers.

“My motivation was to make sure [my mom] didn’t have to come out of pocket,” Deprice told HuffPost, echoing his sister’s sentiments.

His top choice is HBCU Morehouse College, which he said is his dream school. He also told HuffPost that he wants to study Performing Arts and Political Science.

In addition to their acceptance letters and scholarships, the twins boast perfect attendance and a total of 48 awards throughout their high school years, according to Deprice’s Facebook.

The Hunt twins credit their family, teachers and guidance counselors for their successes. They told HuffPost that it’s easy, especially in Chicago, to let negative stereotypes about black youth get the best of someone. That’s why, with the help of Austin, Deprice reached out to local news outlets to tell their story with the hope of inspiring others.

“A lot of people say you can’t do it because of where you’re from,” Deprice said. “Don’t listen to them.”

The twins said they know financial issues, among other factors, hold a lot of teens back. But it’s important to be persistent, Shaprice told HuffPost.

“Never give up,” she said. “Picture your future. Not only to make yourself proud but make your family proud.”

Somebody at home was supporting these kids, through preparation of applications to paying the Application Fees. The article doesn’t say how many schools they applied to, or why they applied to so many, instead of targeting the group they really wanted to attend.

 

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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The HBCU As a Campaign Tool

Neither Bernie or Hillary has much of a depth of understanding about HBCUs. On the good side, HBCUs graduate a outsized number of black students in the STEM Fields. The bad news, is the bulk of those graduates actually only come from 3 schools. The worse news is that in all but the elite 3 HBCUs, the graduation rate is equal to or worse than that of even modest non-HBCU Schools.

If they really cared…or understood – what I think should be done is to finance the top 10 producing schools in terms of graduation rate. Give them the funding, grants, student of merchant loans to develop or expand curricula in the fields the country needs, and some mandates to reach certain goals such as graduation rate, acceptance to post-grad studies rates, and numbers enrolled in specific programs such as the STEM fields.

Governor Terry McAliffe of my state recently tried to attract high tech into the Norfolk area of the state by offering state incentives o Va Tech, Christopher Newport University, and UVa blindingly missing the fact that Norfolk is 53% minority, of which 42% is black, and one of the better HBCU’s with programs in the STEM Fields, Hampton University is located a stones throw away from the proposed new headquarters. And Hampton’s Engineering and Technology Department making Hampton is the first and only HBCU to have 100% control of a NASA Mission.

Would like to see something besides the usual smoke-and-mirrors here.

Misusing HBCUs as a Carrot for Black Voters

In a Democratic primary contest that hinges in part on black voters, the funding of historically black colleges and universities has become a major campaign issue. But, while both campaigns are talking about HBCUs, one is using them as a line of attack. Surrogates for Hillary Clinton have suggested that her higher-education plan is better for black students and HBCUs than that of her opponent Bernie Sanders. Not only are those surrogates wrong in their misuse of the schools, but they’re also wrong about the facts.

“By focusing exclusively on making public college free, Sanders’s plan wouldn’t spend a dime on private HBCUs and threatens roughly 50 percent of HBCUs that are not public,” said Representative Cedric Richmond of Louisiana, in a statement issued by Clinton’s campaign weeks ago. Richmond continued in his criticism that Sanders’s higher-education plan leaves HBCUs “out in the cold.”

“As Senator Sanders promotes his HBCU tour, he owes it to the students to explain why half the HBCUs in the country aren’t worth any investment,” Richmond said.

James Clyburn, a Democratic Representative from South Carolina and a Clinton backer, doubled down on Richmond’s comments days before the South Carolina primary. “If you say that you’re going to have college—free two-year college—among public institutions, why would a student go to an HBCU? And most of which are private institutions,” Clyburn told NewsOne Now. “What will happen is these HBCUs will all close down all across America because they would not be able to afford to stay open.”

With both statements, Clyburn and Richmond leverage just how sacred HBCUs are to black voters while obscuring important context. HBCUs are indeed critical to the education of black students. Despite enrolling just 8 percent of black undergraduates, they award 15 percent of the bachelor’s degrees earned by black Americans. And as the congressmen suggest, HBCUs are grossly underfunded, operating on about an eighth of the average endowment of other institutions. The arguments made by the Clinton surrogates break down, however, with a close look at the composition of HBCUs and where they fit in the black education landscape.

There are an estimated 2,872,000 black students enrolled nationally at degree-granting postsecondary institutions. Of them, only 8 percent are enrolled at historically black colleges and universities. And of all the black students at HBCUs, only about a quarter are enrolled at private HBCUs. In all, a little more than 2 percent of all black college students are enrolled at private HBCUs. It is this small percentage of students that the Clinton surrogates have made the focus of their attacks on Sanders.

Then there are the details of both higher-education plans. Both Clinton and Sanders pledge to lower student-loan interest rates and allow those with existing debt to refinance their loans. That’s where the similarities end. The Sanders plan is marked by its proposal to make public colleges and universities free. In addition to that, Sanders proposes a dramatic increase to student aid, and the candidate recently stated his backing for a dedicated $30 billion fund to support private HBCUs and other “minority-serving institutions.”

The Clinton plan also has its distinctions. It proposes extending a popular higher-education tax credit, limiting student-loan repayment to just 10 percent of monthly income and increasing federal and state investment in public schools that serve low- and middle-income students. In addition, Clinton’s higher-education plan proposes that Pell grants be expanded to cover student living expenses. It also explicitly calls for a dedicated $25 billion fund to provide support to private nonprofit schools that serve low- and middle-income students.

While the Clinton plan creates and increases funding for which black students and HBCUs are eligible, it falls short of the kind of targeted investment the candidate’s surrogates suggest it has in their criticism of Sanders. And although the Sanders plan does not include institutional support for private HBCUs, it arguably does as much as Clinton’s to support their students while also proposing tuition-free education for the vast majority of black students—at public HBCUs (73 percent) and predominately white institutions (66 percent). To be sure, the private HBCU blind spot in Sanders’s higher-education plan is frustrating. Still, for black voters questioning the candidate’s commitment to black schools and higher education for black students more broadly, it’s worth considering the potential impact.

HBCUs have proven vital in educating black students and deserve the nation’s investment. They also warrant careful discussion. Painting HBCUs with broad strokes may make for an effective line of attack, but doing so obfuscates the multiple ways black students access education and the variety of support they require.

 
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Posted by on March 3, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Baltimore…Again

A Baltimore School Officer slaps and kicks a student on video…

Looks really bad, and there is an uproar of indignation rising from a bunch of folks. However we have no idea what led up to this confrontation. I rode our local subway system into and all through the city for the past 3 1/2 years and certainly saw incidents of misbehavior which warranted a bit of old style attention-getting by the Transit Police. Whether such prevented any of the young folks on the receiving end from devolving further into being little sociopaths, I have no idea. It certainly had the effect of reducing petty misbehavior and petty violence on the trains. By the time those that get to major violence and robbery – you are not going to turn them around.

My father was variously a Principal and teacher back in the days of segregation in black High Schools. As a little tyke, who would be dropped off in the afternoon by the sitter, I certainly witnessed an occasional “reeducation” of a hardhead by one of the teachers or the Vice-Principal who also happened to be the football coach. One of the things I never will forget after moving into integrated schools was the level of vandalism and destruction of school property that was tolerated in the integrated schools. We certainly had kids who would sneak cigarettes into the boys or girls rooms – but I never witnessed anyone tearing the sinks or toilets off the wall, or writing graffiti over everything. Perhaps it was the impact of not having much but hand-me-downs from the white schools (“equal” in those days meant you had the same desks and books as the white schools, shortly after they had been used by the white schools for 10 years), and knowing anything that was broken would take a long time, if ever to be replaced.

I remember conversations among the black teachers when they would get together socially. When I grew up, black schools practiced corporal punishment as the norm. My third grade teacher, an older lady probably in her late 50’s or early 60’s at that time was real Old School. She gave a whack across the knuckles with a ruler for each word missed on the daily spelling test or math test…

As a poor speller, I got a lot of whacks. I was saved by the fact I was very good at math.

 

 
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Posted by on March 3, 2016 in Black History, BlackLivesMatter

 

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The Unequal Opportunity Race and White Resentment

The following is a video which has been shown at thousands of schools around the country which contextualizes racism and American history in terms of a track meet.  This video caused quite a storm recently in a county north of Richmond, Va,,,The old capital city of he confederacy. The county has banned the video. I guess it hit too close to home.

Parents outraged after students shown ‘white guilt’ cartoon for Black History Month

A Virginia school district has banned the use of an educational video about racial inequality after some parents complained that its messaging is racially divisive.

The four-minute, animated video — “Structural Discrimination: The Unequal Opportunity Race” — was shown last week to students at an assembly at Glen Allen High School, in Henrico County, as a part of the school’s Black History Month program.

The video contextualizes historic racial disparity in the United States using the metaphor of a race track in which runners face different obstacles depending upon their racial background. It has been shown hundreds of thousands of times at schools and workshops across the country since it was created more than a decade ago, according to the African American Policy Forum, which produced it.

“The video is designed for the general public,” said Luke Harris, co-founder of the African American Policy Forum and an associate professor of political science at Vassar College. “We produced something you could show in elementary and secondary schools or in college studies courses.”

He added: “We found that the video has a huge impact on the people that we’re showing it to. Most of us know very little about the social history of the United States and its contemporary impact. It was designed as a tool to throw light on American history.”

But in Glen Allen, about 14 miles north of Richmond, some parents complained, calling it a “white guilt video.”

Henrico County Public Schools officials initially defended the video, saying it was “one component of a thoughtful discussion in which all viewpoints were encouraged.” But after the story began to spread nationally, school officials switched gears, labeling the video “racially divisive” two days later.

“The Henrico School Board and administration consider this to be a matter of grave concern,” School Board Chair Micky Ogburn said in a statement released to The Washington Post. “We are making every effort to respond to our community. It is our goal to prevent the recurrence of this type of event. School leaders have been instructed not to use the video in our schools.”

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2016 in The Definition of Racism, The New Jim Crow

 

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Same Job – Same Qualifications…Different Pay in Black and White

Like the much touted Gender Pay Gap, there is a racial pay gap. The growth in white female executives has done nothing to change the math. One of the reasons black people are somewhat ambivalent about Hillary Clinton’s feminism.

Searching for the Origins of the Racial Wage Disparity In Jim Crow America

Were black workers paid less because employers discriminated or because of a systemic skills gap?

Even with the bevy of data collected on American workers every year, it can be difficult to nail down the exact causes of disparities in certain workers’ pay, let alone do something about them. Workplace protections such as anti-discrimination clauses and minimum wages have helped a little, but there are still big employment and earnings gaps between black and white Americans.

In a new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research, the economists Celeste K. Carruthers and Marianne H. Wanamaker shed more light on today’s racial wage gap by turning to history: In their research, they look into the forces that determined the wages of Southern men during the 1940s, when segregation was legal and black workers weren’t protected by any anti-discrimination laws.

The big question that Carruthers and Wanamaker wanted to sort out was why the average black man and the average white man were earning different wages. Was it because employers were discriminating against black workers when determining pay? Or was it because black workers’ skill sets were relatively less valuable?

The answer they arrived at, after analyzing school quality, employment and wages, was that differences in skills accounted for the most significant portion of the wage disparities in the 1940s. But the root of that skill gap was still racial. The explicit sanctioning of segregation by Jim Crow meant that black public schools lacked of resources and public funding—shortcomings that limited the skill sets and education levels of young, black men during this period, which in turn limited their job opportunities.

Carruthers and Wanamaker argue that a major determinant of public-school quality—and thus a school’s ability to churn out skilled workers—is funding. As the mid-20th-century South illustrates, a shortfall of money can hamper the development of entire groups of people: “The discriminatory preferences of white southerners were powerful in limiting black public school quality and reducing the wages of young black men through the human capital channel,” the authors write. The persistent inequality of educational opportunities, they found, singlehandedly cut earnings of black Southern workers by as much as 50 percent.

Carruthers and Wanamaker’s findings are notable because they suggest that if black Americans were given equal educational opportunities, they could have had significantly better jobs and compensation, even during periods of systemic and intentional discrimination and disenfranchisement. “Education equality would have been a powerful tool for raising black economic standing in the South,” the authors write. Had schools not been kept separate, or had they actually lived up to the promise of educational equality, the authors hypothesize that the wage gap would be a lot narrower than it is today.

The development that, since the ‘40s, has had the most profound impact on starting to close wage gaps was the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, which effectively ordered more funding for black children’s education by integrating both schools and neighborhoods. Twenty years earlier, in the era Carruthers and Wanamaker were focusing on, many black workers’ best bet was to move: Migration was an effective way for them to beef up their salaries and enter labor markets that were a better fit for their skills (not to mention find school districts that, while still separate, were perhaps not quite so unequal).

Of course, improvements to educational access haven’t been a cure-all. Median wages of black male workers during the fourth quarter of 2015 were only 72.4 percent of those of their white counterparts. And unemployment among black workers is around 8.8 percent, while for whites, it’s closer to 4 percent. And for workers lower down on the totem pole of skills, the gaps are even more troubling. As the Brookings Institution recently noted, nearly half of black male workers who haven’t graduated high school have disappeared from the labor force over the past 45 years, while the share of white male workers without a diploma has declined by less than 20 percent.

Today, many neighborhoods remain effectively segregated, and concentrated poverty means poorer areas don’t yield the taxes and investments to build up high-quality school districts. The result is a black populace that tends to earn lower wages, which keeps cycles of poverty going. School segregation is a major cause of labor inequality in the U.S.—whether it’s intentional or not.

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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Why So Few Black Kids at Elite Universities?

I think two reasons… The anti Affirmative Action racism of the right and subsequent decisions by the SCUMUS was successful in reducing the number of black and Hispanic students, especially in California where high stakes testing is used as the principal barometer for acceptance. At some point  you get a “Death Spiral” effect where the kid visits the campus – sees no other minority kids…And decides to go somewhere else.

The Missing Black Students at Elite American Universities

Minority college enrollment has skyrocketed, but the black share of the student bodies at top research schools has barely budged in 20 years.

Over the past 20 years, black enrollment in colleges and universities has skyrocketed. It’s a huge success story, one that’s due to the hard work of black families, college admissions officers, and education advocates. But at top-tier universities in the United States, it’s a different story. There, the share of students who are black has actually dropped since 1994.

Among the 100-odd “very high research activity” institutions scored by Indiana University’s Center for Postsecondary Research, most saw their percentage of black undergraduates shrink between 1994 and 2013, the product of modest growth in black enrollment amid a much more rapid expansion of students on campus, according to data collected by the U.S. Department of Education.

This list includes not only Ivy League schools and selective private colleges, but also many large public universities, including UCLA, Florida State, and the University of Michigan. Meanwhile, other institutions of higher education—including speciality schools, baccalaureate programs, and colleges that primarily offer associate degrees—have seen black representation increase, sometimes dramatically.

Look at LinkedIn, which is a career networking site.

This statistic put the recent campus discussions on race in a different light: less a spontaneous uprising of discontent, and more an inevitability.

“When you already have an issue around inclusion … these incidents of late heighten that perception and confirm that perception,” said Tyrone Howard, an associate dean for equity and inclusion at UCLA and director of the university’s Black Male Institute. “It gives some students of color some pause—do I really want to go to a place that, at least from the optics, suggests they’re not inclusive?”

Since 1994, black enrollment has doubled at institutions that primarily grant associate degrees, including community colleges. In 2013, black students accounted for 16 percent of the student body there, versus 11 percent in 1994.

Universities focusing on bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees also broadly saw gains, with blacks making up 14 percent of the population, compared to 11 percent in 1994.

Percentage of Black Faculty at State Public Universities

 

But at top-tier universities, black undergraduate populations average 6 percent, a statistic that has remained largely flat for 20 years. (It’s less than half of what their share of the population might suggest; the Census reportsthat 15 percent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 24 are black.) While some schools have had success—the University of Missouri’s main campus has actually increased its black share by 3 percentage points since 1994—the median school barely budged.

(At Harvard, for example, 6.5 percent of undergraduates were black in 2013, down from 7.4 percent in 1994.)…Read the Rest Here

 
 

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