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Chumph’s Ethnic Cleansing of Black Immigrants

The Chumph’s white supremacy and making America white again….Driving While Black, long a method to harass and intimidate the American born black population,  is used as an excuse to forcibly deport supposedly “illegal aliens” who are black, under a system of trumped up laws and regulations designed to rid the country of it’s immigrant black population.

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The ‘Double Punishment’ For Black Undocumented Immigrants

Although only 7 percent of non-citizens in the U.S. are black, they make up 20 percent of those facing deportation on criminal grounds.

If it were not for the Canadian leaf tattoo on his wrist, Chris Gustave may not be behind bars.

In October, 24 year old Gustave was staying at a weekly motel in Phoenix when police arrived searching for his friend, who had violated parole. At first, “all the attention was on him,” Gustave told me in a phone interview last month. But then, Gustave claimed, an officer noticed the tattoo. “The dude just asked if I was Canadian, the next thing I knew I was in here”—“here” being the remote and sprawling Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Eloy, Arizona.

Gustave is one of more than half a million black unauthorized immigrants in the United States—about 575,000 as of 2013. Last week, The New York Times reported that the presence of immigrants from Haiti and Nigeria, who together represent roughly 20 percent of the foreign-born black population, vexed president Trump. The Haitians “all have AIDS,” Trump said in a June meeting with his top advisors according to the Times, while the Nigerians would not “go back to their huts” after seeing America, he said. (The White House denied the comments.)

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Research suggests that because black people in the United States are more likely to be stopped, arrested, and incarcerated, black immigrants may be disproportionately vulnerable to deportation. The criminal-justice system acts like a “funnel” into the immigration system, said César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, a University of Denver law professor who studies the nexus of policing and immigration law. New York University law professor Alina Das said black immigrants are “targeted by criminalization.”

While the Obama administration prioritized immigrants with felony convictions for deportation, President Trump’s executive orders effectively made anyone in the country illegally a target for removal. Arrests of non-criminals more than doubled, and among those who have been charged with a crime, the top three categories are “traffic offenses – DUI,” “dangerous drugs,” and “immigration,” which means illegal entry, illegal reentry, false claim to US citizenship, and trafficking, according to ICE. In fiscal year 2017, almost 74 percent of people arrested by ICE had a criminal conviction—arrests the agency uses to argue “that its officers know how to prioritize enforcement without overly prescriptive mandates.”

But Hernández sees something different in the large number of criminal convictions among ICE detainees. “Racial bias present in the criminal-justice system plays itself out in the immigration context,” he said. “There are so many entry points” to deportation, said Das, “when you are a person of color who is also an immigrant, you face a double punishment.”

2016 report by the NYU Immigrant Rights Clinic, where Das is the co-director, and the Black Alliance for Just Immigration found that although black immigrants represent about 7 percent of the non-citizen population, they make up more than 10 percent of immigrants in removal proceedings. Criminal convictions amplify the disparity: Twenty percent of immigrants facing deportation on criminal grounds are black.

Today, almost 10 percent of the black population in the United States is foreign-born, up from about 3 percent in 1980. As the number of black immigrants has grown, so, too, have the linkages between cops, courts, and the immigration system.

Aside from ICE’s splashier arrests within so-called “sanctuary cities,” most apprehensions nationwide happen inside jails once an immigrant has had contact with local police. This collaboration is a result of decades of legislation and executive action by both Democrats and Republicans. Two years after the passage of his controversial crime bill, former President Bill Clinton signed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act in 1996. Known as IIRIRA (pronounced “ira-ira”), the law expanded mandatory detention and the number of deportable crimes. As the federal inmate population doubled, prison-like immigrant-detention centers rose up in tandem. In the early 1990s, there were around 5,000 immigrants detained each day; by 2001, the populationquadrupled. And the Trump administration wants to keep that number growing: The president’s 2018 budget called for increasing the daily detainee population to 51,000, a 25 percent bump over last year.

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“Additional detention space does make Americans safer,”argued Jessica Vaughan of the Center for Immigration Studies, a group that advocates for stricter enforcement. Detention also ensures that undocumented immigrants don’t “disappear into the woodwork,” Vaughan said. “The benefit of keeping illegal aliens in custody,” she said, is that “it prevents the release of criminal aliens back into the community to have the opportunity to re-offend.”

While the prison population has begun to dwindle in recent years—the incarceration rate fell 13 percent between 2007 and 2015—immigration detention remains “one of the fastest-growing sectors of the carceral state,” said Kelly Lytle Hernandez, a University of California, Los Angeles, historian who studies the origins of U.S. immigration control.

ICE’s Secure Communities program—which began under former President George W. Bush; was expanded, then killed, under his successor Barack Obama; then reinstated by Trump—provides local police with a national fingerprint database to check suspects for immigration violations. ICE can also deputize local law enforcement to make immigration arrests, a power authorized by IIRIRA. Some 60 law-enforcement agencies across 18 states participate in that program.

“Local police are some of the biggest feeders into the immigration-enforcement system,” said Will Gaona, the policy director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona. “And that’s more true in Arizona”—where Gustave was picked up—“because of S.B. 1070.” That 2010 state law, which has since been emulated in dozens of states, requires police to ask about immigration status if they suspect someone is in the country illegally….

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Florida Cop Harasses Black Man With Made Up Law

Apparently stepping outside the walk lines in Florida is a major felony. Not to mention getting arrested for a non-existent law.

Just another case of Walking While Black and an out-of-control racist cop.

WATCH: Florida cop makes up law to ticket black man for walking without identification

According to the Miami Herald, a police officer in Jacksonville, Florida incorrectly cited a law requiring identification for drivers when giving a ticket to a black man for jaywalking and for not having an ID on him, as shown in a viral video the man in question posted on social media.

The video posted by 21-year-old Devonte Shipman on June 20 shows Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Officer J.S. Bolen confronting Shipman for jaywalking.

“Miami Beach, 1962?” the Herald report asked. “No, Jacksonville, 2017.”

When Shipman asked the officer what he’d done wrong, the cop told him that he was fining him for jaywalking, which costs $65. Bolen then asked the young man for his ID, and when he told the officer he didn’t have it, Bolen “snapped.”

“That’s another infraction,” Bolen said. “In the state of Florida, you have to have an ID card on you identifying who you are or I can detain you for seven hours until I figure out who you are.”

According to the Herald, however, the officer got the law wrong — Florida Statute 322.15 requires licensed drivers to always have their licenses when driving and can incur a $136 fine if they do not, but no such law exists for walking without a license.

“Bolen also gave Shipman a citation for failing to obey a pedestrian control signal, another $62.50 fine,” the Herald noted.

 
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Posted by on June 27, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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DWB In New Jersey, When The Police and Judicial System Are the Criminals

It is now well documented how Law Enforcement and a corrupt Judicial System is racially profiling, penalizing, and utilizing citizens of color to finance their local municipalities though harassment, legal intimidation, and fake arrests. The core of what is going on has been exposed, starting with the system in Ferguson, Mo – where the real criminals in the system were the courts and the Police Department.

Ferguson “Justice” isn’t just limited to Missouri…

 
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Posted by on April 16, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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Walking While Black…Not!

Jogger exercising and walking on the wrong side of the road, not using the sidewalk.Local police stop jogger and politely suggest she move across the road to face traffic for safety reasons…

Jogger turns out to be a College Professor of Journalism…And a few days later writes an op-ed in the paper on being “racially profiled”.

Then the Police released the Dashcam footage…showing…absolutely…nothing. Except of course the professor walking on the wrong side of the road on the street instead of the sidewalk.

Anyone else feel someone needs to sit this “professor” down and tell her to STFU?

This is not a BLM moment. It is just a couple of cops doing their job.

I don’t buy the “Rorschach moment” – I see an inability to admit doing something wrong.

Got stopped by a cop one time, while trailering a boat in southern Virginia. Wasn’t speeding, had checked the lights before starting the trip to make sure they were working, the boat was strapped down tight… The cop explained that one of the screws in my trailer license plate had fallen out, and the holder was flopping in the wind and might fall off. I thanked him for alerting me to the fact, which saved me $60 in the cost to replace the plate if it had been lost. Temp fix with a Zip Tie (best thing since Duct Tape!), and on my way.

That is quite simply is a small part of what good Cops do.

Racism? By whom? This video of Texas cops stopping a black professor is a racial ‘Rorschach test’

On Oct. 24, University of North Texas professor Dorothy Bland was walking around her affluent Dallas suburb when she was stopped by police. Bland, who is African American, had been exercising in the street. The cops, who are both white, asked her to walk in the opposite direction so she could see traffic or, even better, to use the sidewalk. Roughly three minutes later, she was on her way.

The short and seemingly simple interaction has proved anything but, however.

Several days later, Bland, who is the dean of UNT’s journalism school, penned an op-ed in the Dallas Morning News claiming that she had been racially profiled.

“Walking while black is a crime in many jurisdictions,” she wrote. “May God have mercy on our nation.”

Dorothy Bland

Corinth Police responded by releasing the officers’ dashcam video of the interaction and claiming Bland had turned a “cordial” stop into a “racial issue.”

“If we didn’t have the video, these officers would have serious allegations against them,” police chief Debra Walthall told Fox News. “Every white officer that stops an African American does not constitute racial profiling.”

Now it is Bland, not the cops, who is facing pressure as nearly 2,500 people have signed a petition urging UNT to fire her.

Although disciplinary action against either the professor or police appears unlikely, the viral video is still generating a heated debate about law enforcement and race relations in this country.

Like Bland, many Americans see the stop as a subtle but significant instance of racial prejudice by police.

“If officers were concerned only about Bland’s safety and her impeding traffic, why did they ask her for her ID? Why did they need her birthdate? Why did they radio in a ‘name check’?” wrote Dallas Morning News writer Leona Allen, who is African American.

“We’re not fools,” Allen added. “Sure looks like they’re calling to check to see if she had outstanding warrants.”

Many others were equally angry — but with Bland.

“As a person of color, this upsets me,” said former Dallas mayor Ron Kirk, who is also African American. “Particularly against what happened in South Carolina. Particularly as this country is wrestling with very real concerns regarding the police treatment of African American youth.”

“She took advantage of a very innocent and thoughtful police response — walk on the right side of the street — she’s just looking for her Skip Gates moment,” Kirk told the Morning News, referring to the 2009 arrest of black Harvard professor Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, which led to accusations of racism against the Cambridge, Mass., police officer. “There’s a real danger here.”…

“It’s a Rorschach test,” wrote Morning News columnist Jacquielynn Floyd of the video. “The way we interpret it probably says a great deal about our beliefs, expectations and experiences in a nation that remains woefully divided along racial lines.”

Were it not for America’s simmering debate over race and policing, the incident could be chalked up as an example of the so-called Rashomon effect. The phenomenon, in which different people draw contradictory interpretations of a single event, draws its name from the eponymous 1950 classic film by Japanese director Akira Kurosawa.

What is undisputed is that Dorothy Bland was walking in the street near her Corinth home on the morning of Oct. 24, when she was stopped by two white police officers.

“I was dressed in a gray hooded ‘Boston’ sweatshirt, black leggings, white socks, plus black-and-white Nike running shoes,” Bland’s recounting began. “Like most African Americans, I am familiar with the phrase ‘driving while black,’ but was I really being stopped for walking on the street in my own neighborhood?”

She continued:

Knowing that the police officers are typically armed with guns and are a lot bigger than my 5 feet, 4 inches, I had no interest in my life’s story playing out like Trayvon Martin’s death. I stopped and asked the two officers if there was a problem; I don’t remember getting a decent answer before one of the officers asked me where I lived and for identification.

I remember saying something like, “Around the corner. This is my neighborhood, and I’m a taxpayer who pays a lot of taxes.” As for the I.D. question, how many Americans typically carry I.D. with them on their morning walk? Do you realize I bought the hoodie I was wearing after completing the Harvard University Institute for Management and Leadership in Education in 2014? Do you realize I have hosted gatherings for family, friends, faculty, staff and students in my home? Not once was a police officer called. To those officers, my education or property-owner status didn’t matter. One officer captured my address and date of birth.

I guess I was simply a brown face in an affluent neighborhood. I told the police I didn’t like to walk in the rain, and one of them told me, “My dog doesn’t like to walk in the rain.” Ouch!

Bland was clearly angered by the encounter. She compared the stop to other instances in which African Americans have died at police officers’ hands.

“Although I am not related to Sandra Bland,” who died in a Texas jail after a traffic stop, “I thought about her, Freddie Gray and the dozens of others who have died while in police custody,” the professor wrote. “For safety’s sake, I posted the photo of the officers on Facebook, and within hours, more than 100 Facebook friends spread the news from New York to California.”…Read the rest of the article here

 

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, The New Jim Crow

 

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Crossing the Street While Black

Guy walking home from work, stops to drop off a video at the local Redbox… Stopped by Cop who “doesn’t like the way he walks”…

Black man stopped by ‘Bama cop for 30 minutes because he ‘didn’t like the way he was walking’

Is it because I’m black?

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, The New Jim Crow

 

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DWB…By The Numbers

Great article in the NYT, with lots of information and data analyzing DWB Traffic Stops, and steps some communities are taking to change. Hit the link below and go over and read it!

The Disproportionate Risks of Driving While Black

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop.

Uncertain whether to get out of the car, Rufus Scales said, he reached to restrain his brother from opening the door. A black officer stunned him with a Taser, he said, and a white officer yanked him from the driver’s seat. Temporarily paralyzed by the shock, he said, he fell face down, and the officer dragged him across the asphalt.

Rufus Scales emerged from the encounter with four traffic tickets; a charge of assaulting an officer, later dismissed; a chipped tooth; and a split upper lip that required five stitches.

That was May 2013. Today, his brother Devin does not leave home without first pocketing a hand-held video camera and a business card with a toll-free number for legal help. Rufus Scales instinctively turns away if a police car approaches.

“Whenever one of them is near, I don’t feel comfortable. I don’t feel safe,” he said.

As most of America now knows, those pervasive doubts about the police mirror those of millions of other African-Americans. More than a year of turmoil over the deaths of unarmed blacks after encounters with the police in Ferguson, Mo., in Baltimore and elsewhere has sparked a national debate over how much racial bias skews law enforcement behavior, even subconsciously.

Documenting racial profiling in police work is devilishly difficult, because a multitude of factors — including elevated violent crime rates in many black neighborhoods — makes it hard to tease out evidence of bias from other influences. But an analysis by The New York Times of tens of thousands of traffic stops and years of arrest data in this racially mixed city of 280,000 uncovered wide racial differences in measure after measure of police conduct.

Those same disparities were found across North Carolina, the state that collects the most detailed data on traffic stops. And at least some of them showed up in the six other states that collect comprehensive traffic-stop statistics.

Here in North Carolina’s third-largest city, officers pulled over African-American drivers for traffic violations at a rate far out of proportion with their share of the local driving population. They used their discretion to search black drivers or their cars more than twice as often as white motorists — even though they found drugs and weapons significantly more often when the driver was white.

Officers were more likely to stop black drivers for no discernible reason. And they were more likely to use force if the driver was black, even when they did not encounter physical resistance.

The routine nature of the stops belies their importance.

As the public’s most common encounter with law enforcement, they largely shape perceptions of the police. Indeed, complaints about traffic-law enforcement are at the root of many accusations that some police departments engage in racial profiling. Since Ferguson erupted in protests in August last year, three of the deaths of African-Americans that have roiled the nation occurred after drivers were pulled over for minor traffic infractions: a broken brake light, a missing front license plate and failure to signal a lane change.

Violence is rare, but routine traffic stops more frequently lead to searches, arrests and the opening of a trapdoor into the criminal justice system that can have a lifelong impact, especially for those without the financial or other resources to negotiate it….(more)

Yet traffic codes are so minutely drawn that virtually every driver will break some rule within a few blocks, experts say. “The traffic code is the best friend of the police officer,” said David A. Harris, a University of Pittsburgh law professor who studies police behavior and search-and-seizure law.

When a Greensboro officer pulled over Keith Maryland and Jasmine McRae, who are black, in Mr. Maryland’s burgundy Nissan early one evening in March, even that vast authority was exceeded, claimed Mr. Maryland’s lawyer, Graham Holt.

In an interview, Mr. Maryland said Officer Christopher Cline had told him that his registration had expired, although it was clearly valid for 15 more days. The officer then said Ms. McRae, sitting in the back seat, “looked like someone” and asked to search her purse. Officers do not have to tell drivers or their passengers that they have the right to refuse, and like the vast majority of people, Ms. McRae agreed. The officer found a small amount of marijuana and several grams of cocaine and arrested her.

Mr. Holt said the stop was illegal because there was no traffic infraction. And in fact, a police corporal summoned Mr. Maryland to the station the next day and scrawled VOID across the ticket for an expired registration.

But the department and a city review board still found that the officer had acted lawfully. And Ms. McRae ended up pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of marijuana possession. She was sentenced to probation, incurring hundreds of dollars in fees.…More here…

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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DWB – Arrested For “Suspicion of Breastfeeding”

Welcome to Charles County, Maryland – where the Cops are still fighting the Civil War.

Maryland cops arrest man and threaten his girlfriend over non-existent ‘breast feeding violation’

Charles County, MD — An infuriating video posted to Facebook this week shows the grim and infuriating reality of incompetent and power tripping cops in police state USA.

Local artist, DC Prophitt was doing absolutely nothing wrong when he was approached by multiple Charles County Sheriff’s deputies. The deputies mistakenly thought that Prophitt’s girlfriend was breastfeeding their baby in the vehicle, so he decided to ruin their year.

The family was getting gas when their world was quickly turned upside down by badged agitators.

When the video begins, Prophitt is understandably aggravated by the stop and he was unafraid of voicing this emotion. As a deputy attempts to cite the couple for the non-existent “breast feeding violation,” Prophitt becomes even more upset.

“You say one more curse word, you’re going to jail,” said the deputy.

“Can we just get the ticket and go?” asks Prophitt’s girlfriend. “My daughters are in there.”

At this point, the deputy then grabs the woman and forces her to the other side of the vehicle. He then begins to threaten her with arrest too.

When Prophitt gets upset that the deputy is assaulting his girlfriend, he voices his concern to which the deputy replies, “Now your under arrest.”

When they ask why Prophitt is being arrested, the deputy asserts his authority, claiming that he is responsible for regulating how people should act in public. “There’s a certain way to act in public my friend, and that is not it,” spouts the deputy.

When his girlfriend asks why Prophitt is being arrested, she is told to “Sit in the car! Or you will be arrested too!”

The video then ends abruptly. According to Prophitt, however, his girlfriend did not stop recording. After police put Prophitt in the patrol car, they approached his girlfriend, assaulted her, took the camera, and confiscated her phone.

The phone was given back to them only days before the court date on Wednesday and the subsequent assault and camera snatching was deleted.

According to Prophitt, On Wednesday, he was found guilty of all charges and police are blaming him for the negative calls to the department from people who’ve seen his ridiculous arrest.

In the video below, a man was arrested, a woman assaulted, and state violence threatened — for what? There were no victims, no property had been damaged, and no one was harmed. This is the type of behavior by police that is driving a wedge in society between the state and everyone else.

Of course, people will say that Prophitt should have just been quiet, accepted the ticket, and he would have avoided the arrest. This is probably true. However, Prophitt’s anger is entirely understandable. He had harmed no one, yet he was surrounded by multiple armed state antagonists, who could and would have killed him with impunity.

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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