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Trump Doctor Appontment

The Chumph’s doctor reports the CHumph has grown an inch and lost 100 lbs since January… Cab you say …Quack!

 
 

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Delta Flight Attendants…And Black Doctors…Again

WTF is going on with Delta Airlines. Once upon a time they had some of he best flight crews of the American carriers. Looks like that has gone totally downhill…

These FA’s need to be fired, as they are endangering passengers.

It Happened Again. Another Flight Crew Can’t Believe a Black Woman Is Actually a Doctor

 

Doctor Ashley Denmark

Dr. Ashley Denmark, D.O., who hails from South Carolina, was on a flight from Seattle to Hawaii. The trip, to attend a good friend’s wedding, was intended as a bit of a rest and relaxation period for the busy doctor, wife, and mother of two. As soon as she heard there was a traveler in need of medical assistance, though, Denmark got up and made her presence known. That’s when everything went awry. Denmark shared her story on her website:

“As I settled in to watch a movie and read a book, about 1 hour into our flight over the intercom, a flight attendant requested a doctor or nurse to report to front of cabin to assist a passenger. When duty calls it calls — even if you are 30,000 feet in air…”

And she continued on social media:“The flight attendant didn’t believe I was a doctor and told me to have a seat while 2 nurses provided medical care to the passenger.”

It was merely a few days ago when Tamika Cross, MD, another young, black physiciandescribed a very similar situation happening on a different Delta flight. In Cross’s situation, the passenger was unresponsive, a seemingly life-threatening situation in which every second counted.

What exactly is it that inspires seemingly normal people to prevent qualified individuals from offering their professional assistance? In life-or-death situations, do we really have time to be prejudiced?

A report by the Washington Post, points to the phenomenon of “implicit bias” as the culprit. “Overt bias certainly exists, but there is also a growing body of scientific literature that’s revealing an even more uncomfortable truth,” according to the article. “Deep-seated unconscious biases help steer our thinking and behavior — even when we don’t realize it.”

One can only hope that by sharing their stories, women like Cross and Denmark can begin to receive the respect that others — particularly older, white men — enjoy without needing to jump through hoops to prove themselves.

Denmark reiterated this hope, telling Yahoo Beauty that she hopes her story raises awareness to the fact that the face of medicine is changing. “Doctors can be young, female, or come from different ethnic backgrounds,” she says. “My hope is that Delta takes into account my unfortunate experience and prevents a similar occurrence from happening again. Despite this experience, I have remained focused and will continue to do so, striving to be the best physician, mother, and wife I can be.”

And to those last words, we’re happy to give her more than the benefit of the doubt.

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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Pill Mill Doctor Goes Down for 30 Years

After the Vietnam War tens of thousands of injured soldiers came home, some with major long term injuries. An unusually high number became addicted to opioids. As a result, thinking on the prescribing of pain medication shifted towards very conservative provision of pain meds. In the early 2000’s medical research found that pain actually inhibited healing and recovery. Patients who were under-prescribed pain medication took substantially longer to recover than patients receiving larger doses. This led to new pain management strategies, and an admission by the medical profession that it really didn’t make any difference if a dying cancer patient became an addict.

This new rationality has helped.  BTx3 had major open heart surgery a few years ago. I can tell you from time spent in that recovery ward that it is amazing people get up from that. The morning after the operation they get you up and walk you around (complete with a couple of carts of tubes and IVs attached to your body trailing along). Of course you are so zorked out from the pain medication you can’t feel the pain. After four days of that, I refused to take the pain meds anymore. The effects of the meds bothered me worse than the pain from a 12″ hole in my chest and other assorted holes for tubes in my stomach, thigh, and legs. Yeah it hurt, but it wasn’t debilitating. Which makes me believe that some folks may be less susceptible to pain medication addiction than others, and such may just be genetic. Science knows that alcohol addiction is passed down by generation – perhaps the same is true for other types of addiction? They sent me home with a bottle full of Oxycontin. I never opened it and threw it away.

The following remarkably sympathetic article about a Dr in LA whose patients were overdosing and dying on pain meds misses one key point. Over-prescription may result ina Dr’s patients becoming addicted. It is a known risk in any aggressive pain management strategy. Prescribing large quantities of drugs to addicted users far beyond that needed to support their well being, and or people who are going to sell those drugs on the illegal market…Is a crime just like that of any street corner drug pusher.

The only differences being, the Drug Pusher doesn’t have a fancy degree from a top University, and nobody claims the Pusher isn’t in the business of crime. They are both i it for the money!

Dr. Hsiu-Ying “Lisa” Tseng, unidentified heroin dealer…One and the same.

Doctor gets 30 years to life for murders in L.A. case tied to patients’ overdoses

A Judge on Friday sentenced a Rowland Heights doctor to 30 years to life in prison for the murders of three of her patients who fatally overdosed, ending a landmark case that some medical experts say could reshape how doctors nationwide handle prescriptions.

The sentence came after a Los Angeles jury last year found Dr. Hsiu-Ying “Lisa” Tseng guilty of second-degree murder, the first time a doctor had been convicted of murder in the U.S. for overprescribing drugs.

Superior Court Judge George G. Lomeli said before sentencing Tseng that she had attempted to blame patients, pharmacists and other doctors rather than take responsibility for her own actions.

“It seems to be an attempt to put the blame on someone else,” he said. “Very irresponsible.”

Tseng, wearing blue jail scrubs, apologized to the victims’ families, her family and “medical society.”

“I’m really terribly sorry,” she said, before addressing the courtroom audience, which was crowded with victims’ relatives. “I have been and forever will be praying for you. May God bless all of you and grant comfort to all who have been affected by my actions.”

The 46-year-old former general practitioner is among a small but growing number of doctors charged with murder for prescribing painkillers that killed patients. A Florida doctor was acquitted of first-degree murder in September.

Some experts fear that Tseng’s conviction will usher in a precarious new reality – a scenario in which doctors fearful of prosecution are hesitant to prescribe potent painkillers to patients who need them.

Attorney Peter Osinoff, who represented Tseng before the state medical board, told the judge during Friday’s hearing that the doctor no longer represents a danger to society since she surrendered her medical license in 2012.

The trial had already had a “deterrent effect” on other doctors and has captured the medical community’s attention.

“More primary care physicians no longer accept or treat chronic pain patients in their practice,” he told the judge.

Outside the courtroom, Osinoff said Tseng’s prosecution has had a negative impact on physicians and patients.

“The doctors are scared out of their minds,” he said. “The pendulum has swung so far. The people who need [pain medication] can’t get it now.”

Other medical experts have echoed his concerns since Tseng was charged in 2012.

“When you use the word ‘murder,’” said Dr. Peter Staats, president of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, “of course it’s going to have a chilling effect.”

Staats said he believes an aggressive medical board – not prosecutors – should go after reckless doctors. But, he added, any doctor who is prescribing pills knowing that they are being abused or diverted shouldn’t be called a doctor.

“That’s not the practice of medicine,” Staats said.

Dr. Francis Riegler, a pain specialist who works in Palmdale, said he has followed Tseng’s case and talked about the prosecution with fellow doctors across the country.

“We agree,” he said, “that if you’re doing the right thing – if you’re one of the good guys, if you will – you don’t need to worry about being prosecuted for murder.”

During Tseng’s trial, Deputy Dist. Atty. John Niedermann told jurors that there were “red flags” in her prescribing habits.

More than a dozen times, the prosecutor said, a coroner’s or law enforcement official called with the same stark message: “Your patient has died.”

Her prescribing habits, Niedermann said, remained unchanged.

The prosecutor told jurors that Tseng wrote a man’s name on prescriptions so his wife could get twice as many pills, openly referred to her patients as “druggies” and sometimes made up medical records.

Her motivation, Niedermann said, was financial.

Between 2007, when Tseng joined the Rowland Heights clinic where her husband worked, and 2010, tax returns show that their office made $5 million, he said.

Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey said the conviction sent an unflinching message to medical professionals.

“In this case,” Lacey said, “the doctor stole the lives of three young people in her misguided effort to get rich quick.”

Tseng was convicted of murder for the deaths of Vu Nguyen, 28, of Lake Forest; Steven Ogle, 25, of Palm Desert; and Joey Rovero, 21, an Arizona State University student who prosecutors say traveled more than 300 miles with friends from Tempe, Ariz., to obtain prescriptions from Tseng at her Rowland Heights clinic.

The jury also found Tseng guilty on more than a dozen illegal-prescribing counts.

 

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2016 in American Genocide

 

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Georgia Doctor Arrested After 36 Patients Die

This one is unbelievable in terms of carnage inflicted by a single Doctor going bad…

Feds raid alleged pill mill, link several deaths to psychiatrist

CLAYTON COUNTY, Ga. —

A Clayton County psychiatrist is behind bars, accused of running a pill mill. Authorities say dozens of patients died.

Only Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne was there as nearly 40 federal and local agents raided the offices of Dr. Narendra Nagareddy.

They later moved on to his home to seize more assets.

“He’s a psychiatrist in Jonesboro who has been overprescribing opiates and benzodiazepine and the last several years has had a multitude of overdoses and overdose deaths,” Clayton County Police Chief Mike Register told Winne.

Agents with the DEA, the Clayton County DA’s office, the Clayton County Police Department and the Georgia Department of Community Supervision converged on Nagareddy’s office armed with a search warrant and an arrest warrant for the psychiatrist Thursday morning.

“He’s charged with prescribing pain medication which is outside his profession as a psychiatrist and not for a legitimate purpose for the patient,” said Clayton County District Attorney Tracy Graham Lawson.

According to legal documents, “36 of Nagareddy’s patients have died while being prescribed controlled substances from Dr. Nagareddy, 12 of which have been confirmed by investigators through autopsy reports to have been the result of prescription drug intoxication.”

“Former and current patients have admitted to obtaining controlled substance prescriptions from Dr. Nagareddy without having a legitimate medical need,” the documents said.

Winne was there as agents took Nagareddy into custody at his home.

“Did you prescribe more than you were supposed to?” Winne asked him.

Nagareddy had no answer.

“People come to this person for help, and instead of getting help, they’re met with deadly consequences,” Register told Winne. “If the allegations are true, he is Dr. Death, no doubt about it.”

The district attorney’s office said they also filed a RICO civil action to seize Nagareddy’s assets.

“Americans are abusing prescription drugs at a truly alarming level,” said Clyde E. Shelley Jr. with the DEA. “Doctors hold a position of public trust and to betray that position cannot be tolerated.”

Well…At least we now know where the Flubberduckkie has been getting his meds, and why he is incoherent most of the time…

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2016 in News

 

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The Long Hard Fall of Olympic Figure Skater and Physician Debi Thomas

How does a World Champion skater, and Olympic Silver Medalist who is a Physician fail?

Debbi Thomas as we remember her –

Here a discussion of her appearing in Iyanla “Fix My Life” on Oprah’s Network…

How An Olympic Icon Ended Up Living In A Bug-Infested Trailer

Debi Thomas used to be a renowned figure skater and a surgeon. Now, she’s broke and unemployed.

From the time Debi Thomas was a young girl, she wanted to grow up to become two things: a renowned figure skater and a practicing physician. She did both.

In the 1980s, Thomas captured the world’s attention from the moment she got onto the ice. While studying for her engineering degree at Stanford University, Thomas won both the U.S. and World Championships. She soon set her sights on Olympic gold. Though her stumbles at the 1988 Olympics in Calgary cost her first place, Thomas took home the bronze and became the first African-American athlete to medal at any Winter Olympics. Then, after a successful figure skating career, Thomas went on to fulfill her second dream. She became a board-certified orthopedic surgeon, eventually opening up her own private practice in Richlands, Virginia.

Today, however, Thomas’ successes seem worlds away.

In between the Olympics and the World Championships, Thomas got married, but says the relationship crumbled after just three years because her husband felt lost in the midst of her popularity. As with her professional stumbles at the Winter Games, Thomas considered this personal stumble to be a failure. Then, more failures: As a physician, Thomas says her high expectations led her to go head-to-head with colleagues, and she was let go from two jobs. Though she had never really wanted to open up her own practice, she did. That’s when another divorce led Thomas to lose her nest egg, she says, and she soon had to close her private practice after two years.

Thomas is currently broke, jobless, twice-divorced and living in a bug-infested mobile home in a trailer park with her fiancé and his two sons. She even lost custody of her own 13-year-old boy, and her fiancé struggles to control both his alcohol use and his anger. Thomas knows it’s time to turn her life around, so she asks life coach Iyanla Vanzant to help her face some harsh truths on a path toward healing….Read the rest Here

 
 

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An American Born, Ethnically Indian Doctor and Race

A Doctor of Indian Descent, not the author of this article.

South Asians (India, Pakistan region) in America also experience racial bias based on their brown skin – even when they are born and raised in the USA. They, along with East Asians have been used as the Model Minority wedge against black and HIspanic folks by the racist right. One of the reasons for South Asian “success” in America, is we are stealing the best and brightest with a strong commitment and background in education from the region. When we say we are “a nation of immigrants”, what that really means in no small part is we have been very successful at robbing the brain trusts for over 100 years with people from European countries before 1965, and around the world now. A large portion of the scientists who built the Atomic Bomb, and who later led our development of rockets were immigrants – educated for the most part in high-level European Schools.

America however, has had a complex relationship with racism for the “groups in the middle” – those that aren’t either black or white. Whether in the days of segregation, classifying the miniscule population of East Asians as “white”, and not subjecting them to segregated schools, to conditions which forced the building of separate “Chinatowns” in areas with any significant Asian population geographically segregated from the white community.

How I Deal with Racist Patients

When a patient requested ‘no Indian doctors,’ I expected the hospital higher-ups to stick up for me. But they didn’t.
Despite being born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, a city infamous for itsformer Jim Crow laws and the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, the most culturally insensitive conversations I’ve ever found myself in went something like this:

“Where are you from, darling?”

“Birmingham! I was born here.”

“No, no, where are you really from?”

I guess my brown skin has always given me away as not really American, so with a quick smile and a congenial laugh, I have always replied with a simple “Oh, my family is originally from India.” Usually this satisfies whoever I happen to be talking to at the moment, and we move on to discussing their favorite place to grab some chicken tikka masala. You know, the only topic safe to discuss with Indians, apparently.

As a physician, I spend much of my day being a “people person,” if you will. From patients and their families to other members of the medical team, most doctors spend the large majority of their day communicating with other people. So we’re well versed with handling almost everything that comes our way, from the inappropriate to the mundane.

Just the other day in clinic, a patient of mine told me about his travels in South Asia and excitedly asked me where I was born after I told him I’m Indian. Upon hearing that I was actually born in Birmingham, he dejectedly stated, “Oh, please, you’re a fake Indian.” Ouch.

Despite this obvious personal affront, I have coped well with the identity crisis that comes with simultaneously being denied the right to call myself either American or Indian. This unique no-man’s-land has usually been cushioned by an ability to separate these casual conversations from my role in the doctor-patient relationship. Except, of course, in the unique situations whereby my race has precluded me from doing my job—not due to any issue on my end, but due to the patients on the receiving end of my care.

I remember early in my residency, a patient specifically requested that no “foreigners” take care of her. This request was made in passing, one time, to her primary doctor, who happened to be white. It never came up again while she was in the hospital, so nothing was ever really done about it.

Fast forward a year or so later in my residency when a patient’s family explicitly requested, well, actually demanded, that no Indian doctors directly care for their mother. This was a little problematic, from a medical and technical aspect, given that the majority of her primary team of doctors was, in fact, some variety of Indian.

As you can imagine, this situation was also ethically, morally, and personally problematic. I wish I could say that this situation was handled well and all misunderstandings were cleared—but the racism and disrespect of this request were brushed away, and the medical team was told by the powers that be to handle the situation with sensitivity. Excuse me, what?

As a medical community, we are all very aware of the racial biases and healthcare discrimination faced by our patients. In fact, NEJM and JAMA have both recently published perspective pieces on these topics. But very few people have taken a look at the opposite end of that spectrum and how the judgments placed on physicians impact patient care and physician well being.

Instead of ignoring these issues, we should be taking strides within the medical community to break down unfair judgments and racist ideals. Minority doctors all tell stories about these experiences and we usually laugh because that’s what makes us feel a little better, but deep down we all know how unfunny it is.

I really don’t mind casual conversation about the best Indian restaurant in town, or the nostalgic reminiscing about that wonderful Indian neighbor from so long ago, or even that little game I play every time somebody asks me if I know that other Dr. Khan/Patel/Singh/Insert-Brown-Last-Name-Here.

But I do mind being judged by the color of my skin. Of all the things that I had imagined brown could do for me, I never really expected it to make me feel out of place both inside and outside of the hospital.

 

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2015 in The New Jim Crow, The Post-Racial Life

 

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First Convictions in Philly Abortion Clinic Crimes

The case of the Philadelphia abortion butcher made national news. Operating out of a filthy facility in the city, the Gosnell was responsible for the deaths of at least 7 children, and an unknown number of mothers. This guy escaped scrutiny by medical and regulatory authorities for years. The cases are finally coming to court, with the first guilty pleas by “nurses” who assisted Gosnell in his scam.

Two plead guilty in deaths at Philadelphia abortion clinic

Two women accused of participating in the deadly activities inside a filthy West Philadelphia abortion clinic calmly told a judge Thursday that they were guilty.

The guilty pleas by Adrienne Moton, 34, and Sherry West, 52, leave seven defendants to be tried in the case that grabbed national headlines due to the shocking nature of the crimes that took place inside Dr. Kermit Gosnell’s Women’s Medical Society.

Gosnell, 70, could face the death penalty if convicted. He is accused cutting the spinal cords of seven babies born alive at his clinic. He is also charged with the third-degree murder of Karnamaya Mongar, 41, a clinic patient who died in November 2009 from an overdose of drugs prescribed by Gosnell.

Moton, of Upper Darby, Pa., was an unlicensed clinic worker. She pleaded guilty to third-degree murder for the death of “Baby D,” one of the seven babies.

She also pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit third-degree murder, participating in a corrupt organization and conspiracy to participate in a corrupt organization.

She entered her plea via a video link because she is incarcerated outside of the city. Tasha Jamerson, a spokeswoman for the district attorney’s office, declined to say why Moton is being held elsewhere and for what reason.

Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner told Moton that he could sentence her to as much as 120 years in state prison and fine her up to $125,000.

The plea came with no agreements with the prosecution, which leaves the sentence up to him, Lerner said.

West, of Newark, Del., was an unlicensed clinic worker who routinely performed illegal operations and administered anesthesia, according to a 281-page grand jury report released in January.

She pleaded guilty to the third-degree murder of Mongar, conspiracy to commit third-degree murder, drug delivery resulting in death, participating in a corrupt organization and conspiracy to participate in a corrupt organization.

Lerner told West that she faced the possibility of being sentenced to 140 years in prison and fined up to $175,000.

Lerner set Dec. 2 as a tentative sentencing date for both women.

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2011 in American Genocide, American Greed

 

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