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Hillary Wins! Give it up, Bernie!

Hillary’s landslide win in California puts a punctuation mark on her campaign to become the Democrat nominee for President. Sanders last gasp effort to carry California couldn’t overcome a better ground game, a better party network, and Clinton’s strong ties to both the Hispanic and black communities.

Hillary is going to beat the Chump, and with momentum, keep the Senate in Democrat hands, and possibly take the House back. I think the American voters have had about enough of whack job, wild eyed extremism – and it is time to take the trash out.

I also believe that in order to keep that majority, Hillary and the rest of the Democrats had better pay rapt attention to the sort of economic changes sought by both the Bernie Bros., and which feuled the Chump’s rise.

Time for Bernie and co. to quit pouting, and go home – until the convention, where they certainly can have an impact on the Party Platform, help energize the faithful for the upcoming vicious battle against the Chumpazoids, and start building a consensus for Progressive candidates at the national level in the house and senate.

What kind of loser will Bernie Sanders be? He’s got three choices

During his barnstorming rallies to massive audiences, Bernie Sanders is fond of declaring “enough is enough!” And after the latest round of primary results, many Democratic party leaders will be hoping Sanders now feels similarly about his own campaign.

Sanders and his team should take immense pride in what they’ve achieved over the past 12 months. On July 8 2015, the RealClearPolitics polling average had the Vermont Senator on a mere 14.3%, almost a full 50 points behind the apparently bulletproof Clinton. To the extent he was noticed at all, Sanders was treated by the press and Clinton supporters as a benign but crusty uncle, well-meaning but toothless.

One year on, Sanders has emerged victorious in more than 20 states, and at one point in April he reduced the gap in that same average to just 1%. And those victories are just half the story.

Most importantly, Sanders and his followers have played a role in forcing Clinton to embrace her own progressive instincts rather than taking to the safety of the centre ground. He has also ensured that “socialism” is no longer a taboo word in American politics, at least not in a Democratic primary. Meanwhile, Winnie Wong, the digital strategist behind #FeelTheBern, will probably never want for work again.

Despite all these achievements, Bernie has fallen short. So what should he do now? If we look to the recent past, there are a few well-trodden routes he can take.

Path #1: unity at all costs

Sanders doesn’t have to set his own example of how to unify the Democratic party after a divisive and close primary campaign. Eight years ago, Hillary Clinton herself showed everyone how it’s done.

After an equivocal statement on the night of the last primaries, Clinton formally dropped out four days later and gave Obama a full-throated endorsement. Later that month, in a symbolic gesture, the two former rivals made a joint appearance in the aptly-named New Hampshire town of Unity, where they had both captured 107 votes in the state’s primary.

And to cap it all, it was she who stopped the (well-choreographed) roll-call of delegate votes at the Democratic convention to formally seal Obama’s nomination. She then used her convention speech to declare: “Barack Obama is my candidate, and he must be our president.”

Despite the lingering bitterness of a rancorous nomination battle, her friendship with Republican nominee John McCain, and the encouragement of hardcore supporters (rallying under the slogan Party Unity My Ass), she then hit the trail and worked hard to help secure Barack Obama’s victory.

Path 2: Berning down the house

Another option for Sanders is to act as a disruptive force and weaken Hillary Clinton ahead of the general election, as Senator Ted Kennedy did to President Jimmy Carter in 1980.

John F Kennedy’s younger brother had already shown he cared little for party unity by challenging a sitting Democratic president, and he continued to show contempt for the principle even after Carter won enough delegates to secure the nomination.

Path 3: viva la revolución!

Perhaps the best parallel for Sanders is the Reverend Jesse Jackson, who ran two trailblazing campaigns for the Democratic nomination in 1984 and 1988. Sanders, mayor of Burlington at the time, was one of the few white politicians to endorse Jackson’s 1988 run – and like Sanders today, Jackson was hardly beloved by the Democratic establishment, but on his second attempt he finished a surprisingly strong second place to the eventual nominee.

The culturally and racially diverse “rainbow coalition” that Jackson formed in 1984 helped propel Democrats to victories in the 1986 midterms, and his strong performance in 1988 suggested that the power of the coalition was only growing.

While Jackson hoped to become the first African-American to run on a national ticket, Dukakis refused. He nonetheless enjoyed a primetime speaking slot at the convention, and his campaign secured changes to primary rules that made the voting process fairer and more proportional. These changes are now credited by some with opening the door to Obama’s victory a generation later.

 
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Posted by on June 8, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Sanders Hits Electorate Issue With Clinton Dead Center

Bernie Sanders just laid out the reason many Progressives are hesitant to support Hillary Clinton. It is in no way that she isn’t qualified, However it is that “conservative” Democrat and connections to Wall Street thing.

Bernie Sanders: ‘Something Is Clearly Lacking’ In Hillary Clinton’s Judgment

“I have my doubts about what kind of president she would make.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders on Sunday questioned rival Hillary Clinton’s temperament for the highest office in the land.

In an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” the Vermont senator clarified his criticism of the former secretary of state last week, in which he said she isn’t “qualified” for the White House.

“The point that I was making, which is absolutely correct, is that if you look at where she is getting the money from Wall Street, another powerful special interest, she voted for the war, she cited Henry Kissinger, in a sense, as a model for her,” Sanders said. “I think those issues will tell the American people that in many respects, she may have the experience to be president of the United States. No one can argue that. But in terms of her judgment, something is clearly lacking.”

In a separate interview that aired Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Sanders again took a swipe at Clinton and her qualifications as president.

“I have my doubts about what kind of president she would make,” he said.

The two candidates jockeying for the Democratic presidential nomination both spent the weekend campaigning in New York, which holds its primary contest on April 19. According to a Fox News poll released Sunday, Clinton leads Sanders 53 percent to 37 percent in the state.

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Why It Ain’t Over – Clinton v Bernie

Hillary is winning the black vote big for two reasons. The first is Bill’s connection with the black community. The second is her style of attending small meetings and gatherings in the community to go eye to eye with the electorate. That person-on-person style worked for Bill…And it is reaping big dividends for her, as voters get to see her up close an personal and get a feel of what she is really about.

Bernie so far, has connected with millennials – but has focused on large rallies.

The difference is shown in the little chart I made up below. Quite simply Hillary wins in states where the black vote is over 12% of the State population. Bernie is winning in states with white populations and few minorities – possibly due to crossover votes from nominal Republicans, which is why polls show that in potential matchups against the remaining Republican candidates show Bernie beating them by bigger margins than Hillary.

This has a lot to do with the Clinton brand, style of politics, and a better staff who understand the intricate details.

 

Clinton-Bernie 1

Based on this theory, Bernie will likely win (or has won) the following states –

Bernie won and projected

So…It is still a horse race – although Hillary will likely win because of her victories in the big states like Texas and projected wins in California and Florida. A lot is going to depend on how well Bernie does with Hispanic Voters as well.

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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New Reuters Poll Claims Sanders National Lead

Not sure if this one is going to be an outlier, or what it may mean for the upcoming primaries…

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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The Story of Robert Smalls, and South Carolina

By 1900, only 34 States had compulsory Public Education systems – 4 in the South. During the reconstruction period when black legislators were elected, Public Schools were established in some states of the South, several were shut down after Reconstruction in Southern States.

The story of Robert Smalls still resonates today – as does the Southern Myth of Reconstruction.

The tale of a former slave sheds light on South Carolina’s presidential primaries

It is impossible not to think of history as we watch the poll results rolling in from South Carolina, where Clinton and Sanders vie for the state’s largely African American Democratic vote, and where Trump handily won the Republican contest, where exit polls indicated that 96% of voters were white .

Much of the state’s history – as the birthplace of secession and a stronghold of Jim Crow segregation – is shameful, and its repercussions are not entirely past. But looking back at one of the state’s legendary African American political figures might help us understand how the state decides to vote come this weekend, especially as the question of reparations becomes a national debate.

Robert Smalls was a slave who stole a Confederate ship during the Civil War and brought it to the Union fleet, gained his freedom, managed to get elected to the state legislature, and ultimately served five terms in Congress .

Smalls’ mother was a slave to Henry McKee, but as a young boy, Smalls was rented out in Charleston, where he learned how to pilot ships. When the civil war broke out – it started in Charleston – he and a number of other slaves worked on the Planter, a Confederate ship, which he daringly captured in the middle of the night and piloted through the mine-infested waters, first to pick up family members of the enslaved crew, and then to the Union blockade of the harbor.

He managed to successfully deliver the ship, which he continued to pilot throughout the war, becoming something of a cause célèbre. In 1865, he brought the Planter to Philadelphia, where he was to give a talk. He was kicked off of the segregated trolley on his way back to the ship, prompting a movement that eventually desegregated that city’s public transportation.

After the war, Smalls ran a store, a newspaper, and served in the state legislature – where he fought for and won the first public education in the state – before being elected to Congress for five terms.

His old home in Beaufort – at 511 Prince St – is marked a historical site and it is is, in many ways, a perfect monument to post-reconstruction race relations in America.

Smalls bought the home in a tax sale when he returned after the war. His mother had worked there raising the McKee children even though her own son, Robert, had been sent away. Now he was back and he legally owned the house.

“After the war, Henry McKee, who was most likely Robert’s father, died,” said Helen B Moore, Smalls’ great granddaughter, who manages a travelling exhibit dedicated to Small. “Mary Bowles McKee was left alone and was both physically and mentally ill . She wandered her way back to the house where she had lived for many years. She came to the door and Smalls, of course, recognised her. She wanted to come in and he allowed her to do so – she was quite ill and quite demented and had no idea the house had been sold.”

She did not remember that the house was no longer her property, according to Moore, but also probably didn’t realise that Smalls himself was not her property anymore.

Moore says the story was passed down through family lore, and no one can say whether it’s true or not. But we can imagine the horror of those conversations as Smalls tried to gently remind this woman, day after day, again and again, that they were equals, he was in the legislature, and he was not her property.

In many ways, the story of Robert Smalls and Mary McKee is the story of race relations in America for the last 150 years. White America continually slips into a kind of dementia, repeatedly forgetting that the world has changed, that we white people don’t own African Americans, that we are not better than them, more valuable, or more deserving of reward. In order to awaken ourselves – and I write this as a white male born and raised in South Carolina – perhaps we need a new reconstruction.

The “ Bargain of 1877 ” ended reconstruction in the south, and we fell into the folly of Jim Crow when the state constitution of 1895 legally enshrined segregation. We were awakened and reminded again of the errors of our ways during the civil rights movement, but quickly drifted into a new form of the dementia as the drug war and mass incarceration followed through.

Last month, Hillary Clinton gaffed at an Iowa debate by implying that reconstruction was a bad time in the nation’s history. The question – who was her favorite president – was an attempt to catch her between Obama and her husband Bill. Instead, she tripped into another hole when she chose that safest of presidential heroes, Abraham Lincoln.

“I don’t know what our country might have been like had he not been murdered, but I bet that it might have been a little less rancorous, a little more forgiving and tolerant, that might possibly have brought people back together more quickly,” she said.

His old home in Beaufort – at 511 Prince St, which he purchased at tax auction had been the former residence of the McKee family which were his slavemasters prior to the War

“But instead, you know, we had reconstruction, we had the reinstigation of segregation and Jim Crow. We had people in the south feeling totally discouraged and defiant. So, I really do believe he could have very well put us on a different path.”

Hillary had backed herself into the old-school view of “the horrors of reconstruction”, and the response, most notably by Ta-Nehisi Coates in the Atlantic , was fierce and immediate.

Eric Foner, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of numerous books on the subject, said: “Here’s why Hillary’s remark struck a chord with people, a negative chord … The old view of reconstruction as a period of misgovernment, of punishment of the white south and that kind of thing, the underpinnings of that are still around today. They reverberate today – the notion that giving rights to black people is a punishment to whites in some way.”

Foner suggests that the discussion of reconstruction is not really about the past. “A lot of the questions that are being debated in our campaign right now are reconstruction issues. You know, who’s a citizen, who should be a citizen? How do you deal with terrorism? What’s the balance of power between the federal government and the states? And the right to vote? In other words, we are seeing issues of reconstruction really fought out right now.”...Read the Rest Here

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2016 in Black History, Democrat Primary, Giant Negros

 

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Spike Lee Endorses the Bern

Once again evidence of that generational split…

I believe we have finally reached the point of full cleavage between the Civil Rights Generation of the 60’s, and black millennials. This has some serious repercussions whatever way the Presidential election turns out in terms of local politics, and elections – and may harbor a shakeup of the current cadre of black politicians in the US Senate and especially the House. Which means a lot more focus on the economics underpinning racism than the symbolism.

 

Spike Lee endorses Bernie Sanders: ‘When Bernie gets into the White House, he will do the right thing!’

Spike Lee is asking America to do the right thing: Vote for Bernie Sanders.

The Brooklyn-bred filmmaker endorsed the Democratic presidential hopeful Tuesday, releasing a radio ad for the Vermont senator’s campaign in South Carolina.

“Wake up! Wake up, South Carolina!” the director said in the ad, borrowing a line from his movies “Do the Right Thing” and “School Daze.”

He continued: “This is your dude, Spike Lee. And you know that I know that you know that the system is rigged! And for too long we’ve given our votes to corporate puppets. Sold the okie-doke. Ninety-nine percent of Americans were hurt by the Great Recession of 2008, and many are still recovering.”

The new spot was released just days ahead of Saturday’s Democratic primary in South Carolina.

“That’s why I am officially endorsing my brother, Bernie Sanders,” he continued in the radio ad. “When Bernie gets into the White House, he will do the right thing!”

Lee mentioned that Sanders was a part of the 1963 March on Washington with Martin Luther King Jr. and added that the senator was once arrested in Chicago “for protesting segregation in public schools.”

 
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Posted by on February 23, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Bernie v Hillary

Interesting demographics in the South Carolina and Nevada turn out. Despite some pundits claims that Hillary is in cruise mode…There still could be an upset in the making if the voting demographics hold up. Basically, Hillary won the black vote…But Bernie won the Hispanic. Hillary’s voters were older, Bernie’s under 45.

It is still a horse race.

What is interesting is the if Sanders were the candidate – he beats all the Republicans handily in polls… The outlier here being positive poll numbers for Rubio. I just don’t see a third rate candidate like Rubio not losing by double digits.

Clinton v Republicans

RCP Average- Trump 2/2 – 2/17 45.3 42.5 Clinton +2.8
RCP Average – Cruz 2/2 – 2/17 45.3 44.5 Cruz +0.8
RCP Average – Rubio 2/2 – 2/17 47.5 42.8 Rubio +4.7
RCP Average – Kasich 2/10 – 2/17 47.7 40.3 Kasich +7.4
RCP Average – Carson 12/6 – 2/3               46.3 45.0 Clinton +1.3

Sanders v Republicans

RCP Average – Trump 1/9 – 2/17 48.8 41.0 Sanders +7.8
RCP Average – Cruz 2/2 – 2/15 44.0 44.0 Tie
RCP Average 2/10 – 2/15 43.0 42.5 Sanders +0.5
RCP Average 2/2 – 2/15 45.7 41.0 Sanders +4.7
RCP Average 10/29 – 2/3 45.3 44.0 Sanders +1.3

 

Sanders may have lost Nevada, but he won over the crucial Hispanic vote

Bernie Sanders may have fallen short against Hillary Clinton in Nevada today (Feb. 20), but there was a silver lining: The Vermont senator won 53% of the vote among Hispanic voters, in the first diverse state to hold its caucus, according to entrance polls.

Young voters were the difference: Sanders won 68% to 28% lead among minorities under 45 years old, showing that he resonates with millennials in Nevada, regardless of race, just as much as he did in New Hampshire and Iowa.

But, as FiveThirtyEight noted, Nevada’s voters are mostly old. And the support of millennials and the Latino community wasn’t enough to edge out Clinton, who won the Nevada Democratic caucus with 52% of the vote.

Entrance polls aren’t foolproof. As some pundits have said, in this particular case, they leave out Nevada’s most-populated county—Clark County. And, as Vox notes, they have incorrectly predicted the Latino vote in the past.

But based on the data currently on hand, 70% of voters who showed up to the polls today were over the age of 45. Among that group, Clinton led with two-thirds of the vote. She was also ahead with non-white voters overall, winning by a huge margin with black voters.

Clinton still has strong support among older Hispanic voters—a divide that was highlighted when Sanders supporters reportedly interrupted efforts by civil-rights leader Dolores Huerta, to provide Spanish translation at a rally at Harrahs casino.

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Cornel West Endorses Bernie Sanders

Looks like Bernie is stealing Hillary’s thunder with black folks…

Why Brother Bernie Is Better for Black People Than Sister Hillary

The future of American democracy depends on our response to the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. And that legacy is not just about defending civil rights; it’s also about fighting to fix our rigged economy, which yields grotesque wealth inequality; our narcissistic culture, which unleashes obscene greed; our market-driven media, which thrives on xenophobic entertainment; and our militaristic prowess, which promotes hawkish policies around the world. The fundamental aim of black voters—and any voters with a deep moral concern for our public interest and common good—should be to put a smile on Martin’s face from the grave.

The conventional wisdom holds that, in the Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton is the candidate who will win over African-American voters—that her rival, Bernie Sanders, performed well in Iowa and won New Hampshire on account of those states’ disproportionate whiteness, and that Clinton’s odds are better in the upcoming contests in South Carolina and Nevada, two highly diverse states.

But in fact, when it comes to advancing Dr. King’s legacy, a vote for Clinton not only falls far short of the mark; it prevents us from giving new life to King’s legacy. Instead, it is Sanders who has championed that legacy in word and in deed for 50 years. This election is not a mere campaign; it is a crusade to resurrect democracy—King-style—in our time. In 2016, Sanders is the one leading that crusade.

Clinton has touted the fact that, in 1962, she met King after seeing him speak, an experience she says allowed her to appreciate King’s “moral clarity.” Yet two years later, as a high schooler, Clinton campaigned vigorously for Barry Goldwater—a figure King called “morally indefensible” owing to his staunch opposition to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. And she attended the Republican convention in 1968! Meanwhile, at this same moment in history, Sanders was getting arrested for protesting segregation in Chicago and marching in Washington with none other than King itself. That’s real moral clarity.

Needless to say, some moral clarity set in as Clinton’s politics moved to the left in her college years. After graduating from law school, she joined the Children’s Defense Fund as a staff attorney, working under the great King disciple, Marian Wright Edelman, with whom she struck up a friendship. Yet that relationship soured. This came after Hillary Clinton—in defending her husband’s punitive crime bill and its drastic escalation of the mass incarceration of poor people, especially black and brown people—referred callously to gang-related youth as “superpredators.” And it was Bill Clinton who signed a welfare reform bill that all but eliminated the safety net for poor women and children—a Machiavellian attempt to promote right-wing policies in order to “neutralize” the Republican Party. In protest, Peter Edelman, Marian’s courageous husband, resigned from his assistant secretary post at the Department of Health and Human Services.

The Clintons’ neoliberal economic policies—principally, the repeal of the Glass-Steagall banking legislation, apparently under the influence of Wall Street’s money—have also hurt King’s cause. The Clinton Machine—celebrated by the centrist wing of the Democratic Party, white and black—did produce economic growth. But it came at the expense of poor people (more hopeless and prison-bound) and working people (also decimated by the Clinton-sponsored North American Free Trade Agreement).

Bill apologized for the effects of his crime bill, after devastating thousands of black and poor lives. Will Hillary apologize for supporting the same measures?

It’s no accident that Goldman Sachs paid Hillary Clinton $675,000 for a mere three speeches in 2013, or that the firm has given hundreds of thousands of dollars to her campaigns or that, in total, it has paid her and her husband more than $150 million in speaking fees since 2001. This is the same Goldman Sachs that engaged in predatory lending of sub-prime mortgages that collapsed in 2008, disproportionately hurting black Americans.

These ties are far from being “old news” or an “artful smear,” as Hillary Clinton recently put it. Rather, they perfectly underscore how it is Sanders, not Clinton, who is building on King’s legacy. Sanders’ specific policies—in support of a $15 minimum wage, a massive federal jobs program with a living wage, free tuition for public college and universities, and Medicare for all—would undeniably lessen black social misery. In addition, he has specifically made the promise, at a Black Lives Matter meeting in Chicago, to significantly shrink mass incarceration and to prioritize fixing the broken criminal justice system, including eliminating all for-profit prisons.

Clinton has made similar promises. But how can we take them seriously when the Ready for Hillary PAC received more than $133,000 from lobbying firms that do work for the GEO Group and Corrections Corporation of America—two major private prison groups whose aim is to expand mass incarceration for profit? It was only after this fact was reported that Clinton pledged to stop accepting campaign donations from such groups. Similarly, without Sanders in the race to challenge her, there’s no question Clinton would otherwise be relatively silent about Wall Street.

The battle now raging in Black America over the Clinton-Sanders election is principally a battle between a declining neoliberal black political and chattering class still on the decaying Clinton bandwagon (and gravy train!) and an emerging populism among black poor, working and middle class people fed up with the Clinton establishment in the Democratic Party. It is easy to use one’s gender identity, as Clinton has, or racial identity, as the Congressional Black Caucus recently did in endorsing her, to hide one’s allegiance to the multi-cultural and multi-gendered Establishment. But a vote for Clinton forecloses the new day for all of us and keeps us captive to the trap of wealth inequality, greed (“everybody else is doing it”), corporate media propaganda and militarism abroad—all of which are detrimental to black America.

In the age of Barack Obama, this battle remained latent, with dissenting voices vilified. As a black president, Obama has tended to talk progressive but walk neoliberal in the face of outrageous right-wing opposition. Black child poverty has increased since 2008, with more than 45 percent of black children under age 6 living in poverty today. Sanders talks and walks populist, and he is committed to targeting child poverty. As president, he would be a more progressive than not just Clinton but also Obama—and that means better for black America.

Now, with Obama’s departure from the White House, we shall see clearly where black America stands in relation to King’s legacy. Will voters put a smile on Martin’s face? It’s clear how we can do it. King smiles at Sanders’ deep integrity and genuine conviction, while he weeps at the Clinton machine’s crass opportunism and the inequality and injustice it breeds.

 

 
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Posted by on February 14, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Tennessee Dems Reject The Race Card, Republicans Reject Religious Bigotry

Blogged a few weeks ago about Ex Memphis Mayor Willie Henreton’s attempt to knock off incumbent Steve Cohen in a majority black district – Ex Mayor Herenton Plays the Race Card in Tennessee based largely on race.

Tennesse Democrats weren’t buying, and handed Steve Cohen a victory yesterday in a landslide.

Tenn. Dems Reject Ex-Mayor’s Race-Based Campaign

Congressman Steve Cohen Seen Here With The Prez

The former longtime mayor of Memphis, who unabashedly campaigned for voters to send him to Congress because he is black, was overwhelmingly defeated by the white incumbent in Thursday’s Democratic primary…

Willie Herenton, Memphis’ first black elected mayor, pushed the race angle throughout his campaign for the 9th District House seat, saying he’s more representative of majority-black Memphis than U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, who is white and Jewish. Herenton had said he wanted to diversify Tennessee’s all-white, 11-member congressional delegation. But with 78 percent of precincts reporting, Cohen had 54,897 votes, or 79 percent, to Herenton’s 14,254 or 21 percent.

Cohen said his victory sends a message that “Memphis is a city on the move and not a city of the past.”

Herenton urged his supporters to back Cohen. Before Thursday, the 70-year-old Herenton had never lost a political race and served 4½ terms as mayor before retiring under the cloud of a federal corruption investigation, which now appears to be over. Cohen, a two-term congressman, countered Herenton’s tactics with endorsements from President Barack Obama and Harold Ford Sr., the first black elected to the seat and senior member of a powerful political family.

“I’m the kind of guy that was always the winner. For whatever reason, it was not part of God’s master plan,” Herenton said.

Democrats have held the seat for more than three decades and Cohen will be the heavy favorite to win in November.

In other election news, apparently internet favorite Basil Marceaux, was not able to overcome… a lot of things… as Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam swept the crowded Republican field –

Mayor and Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Bill Haslam at a Montgomery County, TN Republican Meet and Greet

Also Thursday, Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam won Tennessee’s Republican gubernatorial nomination after a contentious and expensive 19-month campaign. Haslam, the dominant fundraiser of the race, triumphed over U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp and state Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey. With 2 percent of precincts reporting, Haslam had 115,705 votes, or 52 percent, to Wamp’s 59,922 votes, or 27 percent. Ramsey had 43,308 votes, or 20 percent.

State Senate Speaker and Lt Governor Ron Ramsey, whose pronouncement that the Constitutional Guarantee of Religious Freedom doesn’t apply to Muslims roiled the political atmosphere, came in 3rd.

 
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Posted by on August 6, 2010 in News

 

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Alvin Greene – Senatorial Candidate in South Carolina

Alvin Greene… Hisself. This gets stranger every minute.

 
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Posted by on June 10, 2010 in Nawwwwww!

 

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The Wall Smacks Artur Davis in Alabama

What happens when a black politician votes against the interests of his constituents, rejects meeting with black civic and Civil Rights Groups…

And runs against a white politician who has worked hard to attract those groups?

He loses.

Artur Davis

Congressman Artur Davis had been running to become Alabama’s first black Governor. He decided to become a Blue Dog, voting against Health Care Reform, and notably shifting to the right.

What Happened to Artur Davis?

He led in every poll, and just got walloped (In unofficial results released early Wednesday morning, with 99 percent of precincts reporting, Sparks had 199,190 votes (62 percent) and Davis had 119,908 (38 percent).)  Early reports point to low turn-out among blacks:

While hard numbers were not yet available late Tuesday, long time observers in Davis’ camp said Sparks’ victory appears to have been achieved, at least in part, because of low voter turnout among blacks who, unlike two years ago when they showed up in big numbers to vote for Barack Obama, showed no such enthusiasm for Davis on Tuesday.
I find this framing interesting. The underlying premise seems to be that Davis was somehow entitled to black votes. This despite the fact, as Michael Tomasky points out, that Davis reps a majority black district where one in five people lack health-care, but voted against the health care bill. You don’t get to just stand in front the people and say “Hey I’m black and smart” and then wait for the torrent of civic pride.
Sparks seems to have beaten Davis by pulling a significant (perhaps 40% or more) minority of African-American voters while trouncing him among white voters. Sparks carried Jefferson County (Birmingham) handily, although Davis represents a big chunk of the county, and ran well even in majority-African-American counties in or near Davis’ district. The CW tomorrow will probably be that Davis thought far too much about positioning himself for the general election before concentrating on the primary, and that Sparks’ uncontested claim on endorsements by African-American political groups was a big deal after all. It didn’t hurt that the winner also got considerable help from the Alabama Education Association, the big dog in Alabama Democratic politics, and had a substantive issue–a state lottery–that’s always played well with Alabama Democrats, particularly black voters.
Looks to me that Davis is soon to be an ex-Congressman as well.
 
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Posted by on June 2, 2010 in Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

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