Tag Archives: Debate

Cenk Uygur Gives “Awful” Annie Coulter That Operation She’s Been Needing

Androgynous Annie is the right wings flame thrower. She has made a good living attacking anyone on the left with any outrageous statement she can make up…

Cenk is best known for his “The Young Turks” YouTube Channel. The name of which is a play on Turkish History (Cenk is of Turkish origin) and the Progressive left.

Cenk cuts her a new Trailer Park..Or to quote Awful Annie…A new “clitorectomy”.

The bombs start getting tossed at about the 16 minute mark.


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Prison Inmate Debate Team Whups Harvard

So much for only the stupid go to prison…Further evidence that America’s system of mass incarceration is also a complete waste of intellectual resources…


This Is How A Prison’s Debate Team Beat Harvard

Three men currently incarcerated at the Eastern New York Correctional Facility in Ulster County beat Harvard University in a recent debate.

How they did it, though, is as inspiring as it is heartbreaking. Almost everywhere in the United States, time spent in prison is at best wasted, at worst spent in a swirl of violence and humiliation. But prisoners fortunate enough to be situated near Bard College have a chance to participate in a program founded on a radical insight: Prison need not be only about punishment, but can also be a place where people grow and blossom into the educated, responsible citizens they will need to be when they’re released.

The men who stomped Harvard were part of the Bard Prison Initiative. “The most important thing that our students’ success symbolizes is how much better we can do in education in the U.S. for all people,” BPI founder Max Kenner told The Huffington Post. “Our program is successful because we operate on a genuinely human level.”

Beating Harvard wasn’t the first time the Bard team had tasted success. Their first debate victory came last year, when they defeated the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

The program aims to rehabilitate inmates and help them return to their communities productive members of society — among the formerly incarcerated Bard students, less than 2percent have returned to prison.

Studies show that prisoners who enroll in educational programs behind bars are much less likely to return to prison than those who don’t.

In 1999, when Kenner was a Bard College student he encouraged the small, liberal arts school to provide education for prisoners. In 2001, BPI graduated from being a student organization to become a legitimate extension of the college. Today, inmates who are part of the program have the opportunity to earn a Bard College degree.

The BPI is the largest prison education program in the U.S. Almost 300 incarcerated men and women are currently pursuing degrees in six prisons across New York State. Yet, gaining admission to the program is no small feat. Applicants are required to write an essay and go through a rigorous interview process.

“It’s a very difficult, very grueling process,” Kenner noted. “But it’s one that rewards student initiative. And something that we take very, very seriously.”

In July, BPI was awarded a $1 million grant from the Ford Foundation to help support its work for higher education in prisons and innovations in criminal justice reform.

The successes, however, don’t end after inmates are released from prison. Graduates of the BPI program go on to work in various fields, ranging from human service organizations to private business, and many take up managerial positions.

Some graduates decided to further their education by working towards other academic and professional degrees, Kenner said. He pointed out that leaders in education need to be “more optimistic, more courageous and more curious.”…

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Posted by on October 7, 2015 in American Genocide, The Post-Racial Life


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Bill O’Reilly vs Jorge Ramos

What happens when a fake journalist tries to argue with a real one. Jorge puts the windbag in his place on immigration…

As Jorge points out, the who brouhaha coming from the right has a lot more to do with the fact the folks coming here from the South are brown skinned…Than illegal.


Posted by on September 3, 2015 in Faux News, The New Jim Crow


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Marc Lamont Hill vs Sheriff David Clarke

Hill seem that he doesn’t recognize that with bloviators like Clarke – there is no need to be polite.Clarke is not for real, he is a hired Lawn Jockey –  and as such shouldn’t be accorded the respect of an intelligent or genuine person of differing opinion. Got this tube from a conservative racist type on Youtube – so you will have to excuse the tube title.


Posted by on September 2, 2015 in Black Conservatives, Domestic terrorism


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Walton County, Florida — Out With the Old confederate flag…In With the New

Well…At least the new flag is more historically accurate…

The “Old” confederate flag , supporting slavery, Jim Crow, and racism…

This  county in Florida has come up with a “solution” to the confederate flag debate.

County Removes Confederate Flag, Replaces It With Another Confederate Flag

In the wake of the reignited controversy over the Confederate battle flag, Walton County, Florida, voted Tuesday to remove the flag from the county courthouse grounds — only to replace it with a different Confederate flag.

“It’s perplexing how this is perceived as any compromise,” Daniel Uhlfelder, a key force in the local movement to have the flag taken down, told The Huffington Post.

He said he’s been working with community leaders and organizations like the NAACP to get the flag removed since 2002. After South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley called for the battle flag’s removal from South Carolina Capitol grounds, Uhlfelder and others pressured their county officials to follow suit.

The “new” confederate flag supporting slavery, Jim Crow, and racism….

The battle flag used by the Army of Northern Virginia has flown on the lawn of the Walton County Courthouse in DeFuniak Springs since 1964 — the year President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, according to the Tampa Bay Times. The flag was positioned next to a Civil War monument. County commissioners voted 4-0 to replace that flag with the traditional “stars and bars” that was the first official flag of the Confederate States of America.

The county wanted to put up a version of that flag with 13 stars, but one wasn’t immediately available, County Public Information Officer Louis Svehl told HuffPost. On Wednesday, they put up a version with seven stars as a temporary stand-in.

“The soil of Walton County has been enriched with the blood and sweat of the people who came before every one of us, some who fought and died in the war between the states,” Commissioner Sara Comander said prior to the vote, the Tampa Bay Times reported. “I want to honor all of those who came before us, but I also want to be cognizant of those that the present flag seems to offend.”

The previous flag has a unique link to mid-20th-century segregation that the “stars and bars” does not. However, it’s just as divisive.

“They replaced a symbol of segregation with a symbol of slavery and secession,” Uhlfelder said.

“Diet Coke and Coke are still the same thing: a Coke product,” his wife and fellow activist, Michelle Uhlfelder, said in an email. “The Confederate flag and the Confederate battle flag on Walton County’s Courthouse lawn endorse the same statement: this County does not believe in equal rights for all within the halls of justice.”

Daniel Uhlfelder pointed to research by Florida State University psychologist Joyce Ehrlinger from 2008 that suggests exposure to the Confederate flag increases racial prejudice. “When you go into a courthouse, you shouldn’t have your prejudice amplified,” he said.

Why would this happen, you ask?

A quick look at Walton County’s demographics according to Wiki…

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 40,601 people, 16,548 households, and 11,120 families residing in the county. Thepopulation density was 38 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 29,083 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 88.41% White, 6.98% Black or African American, 1.28% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.75% from other races, and 2.09% from two or more races. 2.17% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic Other
2012 75.9% 23.3% 1.5%
2008 72.1% 26.4% 1.5%
2004 73.2% 25.9% 0.9%
2000 66.5% 30.8% 2.7%

‘Nuf said.


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Brooks Argues Ta-Nehisi Coates is Wrong

 Interesting battle between a white Liberal and Ta-Nehisi Coates. David Brooks is getting hammered in several publications as representing the liberal racist wing of the left, here, here, and here. This battle has political repercussions in the candidacy of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

Hillary Clinton could be the unlikely beneficiary of white progressives’ stumbles on race. The woman who herself stumbled facing Barack Obama in 2008 seems to have learned from her political mistakes.  She’s taken stands on mass incarceration and immigration reform that put her nominally to the left of de Blasio’s Progressive Agenda on those issues, as well as the president’s. Clinton proves that these racial blind spots can be corrected. And American politics today requires that they be corrected: no Democrat can win the presidency without consolidating the Obama coalition, particularly the African American vote.

In fact, African American women are to the Democrats what white evangelical men are to Republicans: the most devoted, reliable segment of the party base. But where all the GOP contenders pander to their base, Democrats often don’t even acknowledge theirs. Clinton seems determined to do things differently, the second time around. The hiring of senior policy advisor Maya Harris as well as former Congressional Black Caucus director LaDavia Drane signal the centrality of black female voters to the campaign. In a briefing with reporters Thursday in Brooklyn, senior Clinton campaign officials said their polling shows she’s doing very well with the Obama coalition, despite her 2008 struggles – but she’s taking nothing for granted.

For Sanders..

Democrats are pinning their electoral fortunes on African-American and Latino voters. But the Sanders revolution looks a lot like Vermont, the second whitest state in the country. To mount a competitive challenge against Hillary Clinton, Sanders must do something he has never had to do—reach beyond the kind of post-racial political message he honed in his home state and connect with voters who don’t look like him.

And so far, he’s coming up short.

“I haven’t seen him engaging the black community. Nor am I hearing any chatter about him,” said Rick Wade, Obama for America’s African-American vote director. “Black voters don’t know him.”

A June CNN/ORC poll showed just 2% of black Democrats supporting Sanders, a figure that has remained unchanged since February. Among non-white voters overall, Sanders polls at 9% compared to Hillary Clinton’s 61%.

And then there is Brook’s…”It really wasn’t that bad” excuse…

Listening to Ta-Nehisi Coates While White

Dear Ta-Nehisi Coates,

The last year has been an education for white people. There has been a depth, power and richness to the African-American conversation about Ferguson, Baltimore, Charleston and the other killings that has been humbling and instructive.

Your new book, “Between the World and Me,” is a great and searing contribution to this public education. It is a mind-altering account of the black male experience. Every conscientious American should read it.

There is a pervasive physicality to your memoir — the elemental vulnerability of living in a black body in America. Outside African-American nightclubs, you write, “black people controlled nothing, least of all the fate of their bodies, which could be commandeered by the police; which could be erased by the guns, which were so profligate; which could be raped, beaten, jailed.”

Written as a letter to your son, you talk about the effects of pervasive fear. “When I was your age the only people I knew were black and all of them were powerfully, adamantly, dangerously afraid.”

But the disturbing challenge of your book is your rejection of the American dream. My ancestors chose to come here. For them, America was the antidote to the crushing restrictiveness of European life, to the pogroms. For them, the American dream was an uplifting spiritual creed that offered dignity, the chance to rise.

Your ancestors came in chains. In your book the dream of the comfortable suburban life is a “fairy tale.” For you, slavery is the original American sin, from which there is no redemption. America is Egypt without the possibility of the Exodus. African-American men are caught in a crushing logic, determined by the past, from which there is no escape.

You write to your son, “Here is what I would like for you to know: In America, it is traditional to destroy the black body — it is heritage.” The innocent world of the dream is actually built on the broken bodies of those kept down below.

If there were no black bodies to oppress, the affluent Dreamers “would have to determine how to build their suburbs on something other than human bones, how to angle their jails toward something other than a human stockyard, how to erect a democracy independent of cannibalism.”

Your definition of “white” is complicated. But you write “ ‘White America’ is a syndicate arrayed to protect its exclusive power to dominate and control our bodies. Sometimes this power is direct (lynching), and sometimes it is insidious (redlining).” In what is bound to be the most quoted passage from the book, you write that you watched the smoldering towers of 9/11 with a cold heart. At the time you felt the police and firefighters who died “were menaces of nature; they were the fire, the comet, the storm, which could — with no justification — shatter my body.”

You obviously do not mean that literally today (sometimes in your phrasing you seem determined to be misunderstood). You are illustrating the perspective born of the rage “that burned in me then, animates me now, and will likely leave me on fire for the rest of my days.”

I read this all like a slap and a revelation. I suppose the first obligation is to sit with it, to make sure the testimony is respected and sinks in. But I have to ask, Am I displaying my privilege if I disagree? Is my job just to respect your experience and accept your conclusions? Does a white person have standing to respond?

If I do have standing, I find the causation between the legacy of lynching and some guy’s decision to commit a crime inadequate to the complexity of most individual choices.

I think you distort American history. This country, like each person in it, is a mixture of glory and shame. There’s a Lincoln for every Jefferson Davis and a Harlem Children’s Zone for every K.K.K. — and usually vastly more than one. Violence is embedded in America, but it is not close to the totality of America.

In your anger at the tone of innocence some people adopt to describe the American dream, you reject the dream itself as flimflam. But a dream sullied is not a lie. The American dream of equal opportunity, social mobility and ever more perfect democracy cherishes the future more than the past. It abandons old wrongs and transcends old sins for the sake of a better tomorrow.

This dream is a secular faith that has unified people across every known divide. It has unleashed ennobling energies and mobilized heroic social reform movements. By dissolving the dream under the acid of an excessive realism, you trap generations in the past and destroy the guiding star that points to a better future.

Maybe you will find my reactions irksome. Maybe the right white response is just silence for a change. In any case, you’ve filled my ears unforgettably.

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Posted by on July 23, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life


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Jenny Horne Brings Down the Flag in South Carolina

One legislators powerful words finally moved the South Carolina House to vote to take down the confederate flag. Jenny Horne, Republican representative from Summerville – who is a descendant of Jefferson Davis, the confederate President made an impassioned speech on the floor of the SC House…WHich left no room for further argument.

Jenny Horne: How a descendant of the president of the Confederacy helped vanquish his flag

…In a remarkable scene, reminiscent of furious 19th Century slavery debates in Congress, members of the South Carolina House of Representatives made passionate pleas for and against keeping the Confederate flag flying in front of the state capitol.

Over 13 excruciating hours, the entire country watched as the ghosts of the Civil War seemed to stir once more.  There was soul-searching and breast-beating, shouting and tears, insults and accusations and amendments, lots of them, designed to thwart a vote.

And for a moment, it seemed as if the Confederate flag just might keep flying after all.

But then Jenny Horne decided that she had had enough.

The 42-year-old lawyer from Summerville stepped up to the podium and delivered words so raw and impassioned they would immediately go viral on the Internet. More important, her four-minute speech would alter the course of the debate, and with it, South Carolina history. The state where the Civil War began, where Strom Thurmond presided as governor, and father of the segregationist Dixiecrats, a state steeped proudly in history and its symbols, disavowed the most freighted symbol of them all, the Confederate flag.

“I cannot believe that we do not have the heart in this body to do something meaningful such as take a symbol of hate off these grounds on Friday,” Horne said, shouting through tears. “For the widow of Sen. Pinckney and his two young daughters, that would be adding insult to injury.”

Horne’s fiery speech, bolstered by her reminder that Confederate president Jefferson Davis was her ancestor, injected new energy into what appeared to be a flagging take-down-the-flag faction and helped pave the way for a 1 a.m. vote to remove the flag from the state capitol.


Posted by on July 9, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life


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