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John Kelly Lied in Comments About Frederica Wilson

And here’s the tape –

Frederica Wilson not only did not credit herself for the funding of the FBI Building in Florida as Kelly stated, she claimed to have fast tracked the naming of the Building, thanked then Republican Speaker Boehner, and Marco Rubio for getting the building named for two FBI Agents killed in action, in record time at the behest of the FBI.

Worse  – when spent the second half of her speech, prising the fallen FBI Agents and the FBI and Law Enforcement for protecting the community.

The General’s “barrel” isn’t empty…

It’s full of shit.

Here is her whole speech –

 
 

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Chumph Private Gulags Already Killing Immigrants

The reason Putin’s Bitch wants private prisons is so they can cover up the atrocities.

Privatizing Buchenwald…

Image result for Nazi extermination camps

The New Concentration Camps under the Chumph… Not much different than the old, except under private ownership

Immigrant Deaths in Private Prisons Explode Under Trump

A man killed himself after 19 days in solitary confinement, days before another man died of heart failure.

Men and women held by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement are on pace to die at double the rate of those who died in ICE custody last year, a Daily Beast review of ICE records found. And most will die in privately run facilities.

Eight people have died in ICE custody in the 2017 fiscal year, which began on Oct. 1, 2016. That’s almost as many as the 10 who died in the entire 2016 fiscal year. All but one of the deaths this year, and all but two last year, occurred in privately run prisons. Nine of the 18 deaths occurred at facilities run by GEO Group, the nation’s second-largest private prison company.

Jean Jimenez-Joseph hanged himself two weeks ago at a CoreCivic-run facility in Georgia after 19 consecutive days in solitary confinement, according to immigrant advocates in the state. Days earlier at a GEO-run facility in Texas, an Afghan mother seeking asylum from the Taliban tried to hang herself but lived. Atulkumar Babubhai Patel died of congestive heart failure in Georgia’s Atlanta City Detention Center that same week.

The uptick in deaths have come after a spike in arrests of immigrants thanks to executive orders signed by President Trump. In the first 100 days of the Trump administration, ICE said it arrested more than 41,000 people—an increase of 37 percent over the same period last year.

On any given day, 35,000 men, women, and children are held inside more than 200 immigrant detention facilities, according to ICE’s 2017 budget. Attorneys and advocates are concerned that the arrests are overcrowding facilities already criticized by watchdogs over understaffing, poor medical care, and violence.

“You’re guess is as good as mine,” said Matthew Kolken, a Buffalo-based immigration attorney, when asked if overcrowding and worsening conditions could be resulting in more deaths. “But if I were in one of these facilities, I wouldn’t want to bet my life on the staff and conditions there.”

Just before 1 a.m. on May 15, Jimenez-Joseph was found unconscious in his cell at Stewart, run by CoreCivic. The 27-year-old had hanged himself, ICE said, adding that he was taken to a hospital located 35 miles away, where he was pronounced dead.

CoreCivic directed The Daily Beast’s questions to ICE. In a statement, ICE said Jimenez-Joseph had been placed in solitary confinement for fighting with another detainee, and his stay in solitary was extended after allegedly exposing himself to a female employee of the facility. He was scheduled to be released from solitary the week he hanged himself, ICE spokesperson Bryan Cox said.

Two days prior to hanging himself, Cox said, Jimenez-Joseph’s mother and father visited him at Stewart. The next day, members of an advocacy group were denied a meeting with Jimenez-Joseph by CoreCivic employees, according to Cox. A CoreCivic spokesman did not immediately say why members of the group were not allowed to see Jimenez-Joseph.

Other times at Stewart, solitary confinement has been used to punish detainees who went on hunger strike to protest conditions, according to a study conducted by immigrant-advocacy group Project South and PennState Law’s Center for Immigrants’ Rights Clinic.

“What we’ve seen is that solitary is used as punishment for a variety of things, but especially for protesting conditions,” Azadeh Shahshahani of Project South said. “They’re far away from their homes and families, they don’t have access to an attorney, so, really, putting their bodies on the line [in hunger strikes, for example] is often their only form of protest.”

Samira Hakimi would have been another suicide death, had she succeeded in her attempt in the Karnes County Residential Center in Karnes City, Texas, on May 12, according to advocates…

 

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Depiddy Lawn Jockey Faces Criminal Investigation

Wonder if they will give the boy an orange cowboy hat to go with his new uniform?

Sheriff David Clarke, who is really the supervisor of the jail in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin is in serious trouble. At least four deaths have occurred in his jails under questionable circumstances. There appears to be a pattern of prisoner abuse and brutality at the jail, including an incident where a pregnant prisoner was chained to a bed during childbirth. In a case resulting in a Federal Lawsuit, a woman was confined to solitary, without medical attention. She was 8 1/ months pregnant, was denied medical care, and her baby, born alive, died soon after.

Evidence has also come out that the Depiddy also tried to get the County Coroner to cover up the causes of the deaths.

DA Begins Official Inquest Before Considering Charges

Prosecutors say Milwaukee County Jail officers cut off an inmate’s water for seven consecutive days before the man died of dehydration.

Milwaukee County Assistant District Attorney Kurt Bentley told jurors at an inquest Monday that the inmate, Terrill Thomas, was mentally unstable and unable to ask for help before he died in his cell in April 2016.

The DA’s office is asking a jury for advice on whether there’s probable cause that a crime was committed in Thomas’ death. The medical examiner has already ruled Thomas died because of dehydration.

Testimony and documents at the inquest revealed Thomas was moved to a solitary disciplinary unit where his water was cut off after he used a mattress to flood his cell in another jail unit.

Separately, Thomas’ children have filed a federal civil suit, saying their father’s treatment by Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke and his staff amounts to torture.

Attorney Walter Stern represents three of Thomas’ children. As he left the courtroom Monday afternoon, Stern said it was an interesting day.

“There was a police report indicating that this man was asking for, or begging for water,” Stern said. “Put it all together and it looks like there was profound dehydration.”

Thomas’ death was one of four at the Milwaukee County Jail last year, but Clarke won’t be a witness in the inquest. Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm said don’t read anything into that.

“I don’t think anybody should draw any conclusions. This is really a fact-based investigation,and so, what you try to do is limit yourself to people who have direct knowledge of the incident itself,” Chisholm said.

The inquest may last all week. The prosecutor’s office will then decide whether to file charges.

Terrill Thomas

Terill Thomas, a mentally ill man was placed in solitary, and denied water for 7 days. He died of severe dehydration.

Kristina Fiebrink

Kristina Fiebrink died on August 28th after she was arrested and booked on August 24th. The lawsuit says “despite exhibiting signs and symptoms of acute heroin and alcohol intoxication, Fiebrink was never placed on preventative detoxification protocol, seen by a doctor, provided withdrawal medication or placed on a heightened observation level.”

Michael Madden

Michael Madden died on October 28th. The lawsuit says he was suffering from a heart condition which he had had since birth, as well as a heroin addiction. The lawsuit says he “received little to no health care while in the Justice Facility.” He suffered a seizure, rendering him unconscious, and passed away.

Shade Swayzer

Sade Swazer, a pregnant, mentally ill woman confined to solitary. No medical care was provided – her baby dies soon after birth in the cell.

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2017 in Black Conservatives

 

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More People Dying From Heroin Overdose Than Murder by Gun!

Check this out…

OF course the majority (by a pretty good margin) of these deaths are of white people living in the suburbs and rural areas…So unlike the “crack epidemic” there isn’t going to be any push to criminalize.

Yet another reason the “War on Drugs” has been an utter and complete failure.

Heroin deaths surpass gun homicides for the first time, CDC data shows

Opioid deaths continued to surge in 2015, surpassing 30,000 for the first time in recent history, according to CDC data released Thursday.

That marks an increase of nearly 5,000 deaths from 2014. Deaths involving powerful synthetic opiates, like fentanyl, rose by nearly 75 percent from 2014 to 2015.

Heroin deaths spiked too, rising by more than 2,000 cases. For the first time since at least the late 1990s, there were more deaths due to heroin than to traditional opioid painkillers, like hydrocodone and oxycodone.

In the CDC’s opioid death data, deaths may involve more than one individual drug category, so numbers in the chart above aren’t mutually exclusive. Many opioid fatalities involve a combination of drugs, often multiple types of opioids, or opioids in conjunction with other sedative substances like alcohol.

In a grim milestone, more people died from heroin-related causes than from gun homicides in 2015. As recently as 2007, gun homicides outnumbered heroin deaths by more than 5 to 1.

These increases come amid a year-over-year increase in mortality across the board, resulting in the first decline in American life expectancy since 1993.

 

 
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Posted by on December 8, 2016 in American Genocide, American Greed

 

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Another Murder By Chumph Lawn Jockey Deppity Clarke

This clown operates a small jail in a fairly small county…So why so many deaths?

Something stinks in Milwaukee!

This murdering POS needs to be locked up.

 

Image result for dead baby on gurney

Infant dies in Trump-loving sheriff’s jail after guard laughs off inmate’s plea for help: lawsuit

Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke was one of Donald Trump’s most enthusiastic boosters during the presidential campaign, and he’s been rumored to be on the shortlist for a job with Trump’s administration.

However, Clarke has a major potential problem that could wind up costing him a plum position in Washington, D.C. — namely, people keep dying in the jail that he oversees.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that a newborn infant died in the Milwaukee County Jail this past summer after a corrections officer allegedly laughed off a pregnant inmate’s pleas for help as she was giving birth.

Former inmate Shadé Swayzer claims that she didn’t get any medical attention for six hours after she first pleaded with a guard to help her as she went into labor. In fact, she says that even after she gave birth, it took the jail an additional two hours to deliver medical aid to her newborn baby, who subsequently died later in the day.

“Swayzer’s lawyer, Jason Jankowski, wrote in the notice of claim that Swayzer told a corrections officer her water broke and she was going into labor, but the officer laughed and ignored her,” the Journal Sentinel reports.

Swayzer is seeking $8.5 million in damages against the government over the incident.

Swayzer’s infant is the fourth person to die in the Milwaukee County Jail over the past eight months, including one man who died from dehydration while in custody.

 
 

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UN Finally Admits Role in Cholera Epidemic in Haiti

The whole truth of this, as I suspect a lot of things in the 3rd world, has never been admitted. Having been in Haiti working when the epidemic started, I think the numbers provided by the world press are off by 5 or more. Indeed, one person I know who was in position to say – put the number of dead the first two days at double the claimed total number today.

The Haitians figured out pretty quick where the cholera came from. A disease which Papa Doc had eliminated in the country. The UN promptly went into cover-up mode, even when it was found that the sewage trenches dug by their soldiers from Nepal were leaking directly into the river. And even after it was discovered by DWB that the strain of cholera was native to the Nepal region of Asia. Even when it was shown that those soldier hadn’t been screened for cholera and other infectuous diseases (which is a UN requirement) prior to deployment.

Haitian despise the UN’s Minustah which is their “Peacekeeping” Military force – and this is just one of the reasons.

U.N. Admits Role in Cholera Epidemic in Haiti

For the first time since a cholera epidemic believed to be imported by United Nations peacekeepers began killing thousands of Haitians nearly six years ago, the office of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has acknowledged that the United Nations played a role in the initial outbreak and that a “significant new set of U.N. actions” will be needed to respond to the crisis.

The deputy spokesman for the secretary general, Farhan Haq, said in an email this week that “over the past year, the U.N. has become convinced that it needs to do much more regarding its own involvement in the initial outbreak and the suffering of those affected by cholera.” He added that a “new response will be presented publicly within the next two months, once it has been fully elaborated, agreed with the Haitian authorities and discussed with member states.”

The statement comes on the heels of a confidential report sent to Mr. Ban by a longtime United Nations adviser on Aug. 8. Written by Philip Alston, a New York University law professor who serves as one of a few dozen experts, known as special rapporteurs, who advise the organization on human rights issues, the draft language stated plainly that the epidemic “would not have broken out but for the actions of the United Nations.”

The secretary general’s acknowledgment, by contrast, stopped short of saying that the United Nations specifically caused the epidemic. Nor does it indicate a change in the organization’s legal position that it is absolutely immune from legal actions, including a federal lawsuit brought in the United States on behalf of cholera victims seeking billions in damages stemming from the Haiti crisis.

But it represents a significant shift after more than five years of high-level denial of any involvement or responsibility of the United Nations in the outbreak, which has killed at least 10,000 people and sickened hundreds of thousands. Cholera victims suffer from dehydration caused by severediarrhea or vomiting.

Special rapporteurs’ reports are technically independent guidance, which the United Nations can accept or reject. United Nations officials have until the end of this week to respond to the report, which will then go through revisions, but the statement suggests a new receptivity to its criticism.

In the 19-page report, obtained from an official who had access to it, Mr. Alston took issue with the United Nations’ public handling of the outbreak, which was first documented in mid-October 2010, shortly after people living along the Meille River began dying from the disease.

The first victims lived near a base housing 454 United Nations peacekeepers freshly arrived from Nepal, where a cholera outbreak was underway, and waste from the base often leaked into the river. Numerous scientists have since argued that the base was the only plausible source of the outbreak — whose real death toll, one study found, could be much higher than the official numbers state — but United Nations officials have consistently insisted that its origins remain up for debate.

Mr. Alston wrote that the United Nations’ Haiti cholera policy “is morally unconscionable, legally indefensible and politically self-defeating.” He added, “It is also entirely unnecessary.” The organization’s continuing denial and refusal to make reparations to the victims, he argued, “upholds a double standard according to which the U.N. insists that member states respect human rights, while rejecting any such responsibility for itself.”

He said, “It provides highly combustible fuel for those who claim that U.N. peacekeeping operations trample on the rights of those being protected, and it undermines both the U.N.’s overall credibility and the integrity of the Office of the Secretary-General.”

Mr. Alston went beyond criticizing the Department of Peacekeeping Operations to blame the entire United Nations system. “As the magnitude of the disaster became known, key international officials carefully avoided acknowledging that the outbreak had resulted from discharges from the camp,” he noted.

His most severe criticism was reserved for the organization’s Office of Legal Affairs, whose advice, he wrote, “has been permitted to override all of the other considerations that militate so powerfully in favor of seeking a constructive and just solution.” Its interpretations, he said, have “trumped the rule of law.”

Mr. Alston also argued in his report that, as The New York Times hasreported, the United Nations’ cholera eradication program has failed. Infection rates have been rising every year in Haiti since 2014, as the organization struggles to raise the $2.27 billion it says is needed to eradicate the disease from member states. No major water or sanitation projects have been completed in Haiti; two pilot wastewater processing plants built there in the wake of the epidemic quickly closed because of a lack of donor funds.

In a separate internal report released days ago after being withheld for nearly a year, United Nations auditors said a quarter of the sites run by the peacekeepers with the organization’s Stabilization Mission in Haiti, or Minustah, that they had visited were still discharging their waste into public canals as late as 2014, four years after the epidemic began.

“Victims are living in fear because the disease is still out there,” Mario Joseph, a prominent Haitian human rights lawyer representing cholera victims, told demonstrators in Port-au-Prince last month. He added, “If the Nepalese contingent returns to defecate in the water again, they will get the disease again, only worse.”

In 2011, when families of 5,000 Haitian cholera victims petitioned the United Nations for redress, its Office of Legal Affairs simply declared their claims “not receivable.” (Mr. Alston called that argument “wholly unconvincing in legal terms.”)…More…

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2016 in Haiti

 

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Pill Mill Doctor Goes Down for 30 Years

After the Vietnam War tens of thousands of injured soldiers came home, some with major long term injuries. An unusually high number became addicted to opioids. As a result, thinking on the prescribing of pain medication shifted towards very conservative provision of pain meds. In the early 2000’s medical research found that pain actually inhibited healing and recovery. Patients who were under-prescribed pain medication took substantially longer to recover than patients receiving larger doses. This led to new pain management strategies, and an admission by the medical profession that it really didn’t make any difference if a dying cancer patient became an addict.

This new rationality has helped.  BTx3 had major open heart surgery a few years ago. I can tell you from time spent in that recovery ward that it is amazing people get up from that. The morning after the operation they get you up and walk you around (complete with a couple of carts of tubes and IVs attached to your body trailing along). Of course you are so zorked out from the pain medication you can’t feel the pain. After four days of that, I refused to take the pain meds anymore. The effects of the meds bothered me worse than the pain from a 12″ hole in my chest and other assorted holes for tubes in my stomach, thigh, and legs. Yeah it hurt, but it wasn’t debilitating. Which makes me believe that some folks may be less susceptible to pain medication addiction than others, and such may just be genetic. Science knows that alcohol addiction is passed down by generation – perhaps the same is true for other types of addiction? They sent me home with a bottle full of Oxycontin. I never opened it and threw it away.

The following remarkably sympathetic article about a Dr in LA whose patients were overdosing and dying on pain meds misses one key point. Over-prescription may result ina Dr’s patients becoming addicted. It is a known risk in any aggressive pain management strategy. Prescribing large quantities of drugs to addicted users far beyond that needed to support their well being, and or people who are going to sell those drugs on the illegal market…Is a crime just like that of any street corner drug pusher.

The only differences being, the Drug Pusher doesn’t have a fancy degree from a top University, and nobody claims the Pusher isn’t in the business of crime. They are both i it for the money!

Dr. Hsiu-Ying “Lisa” Tseng, unidentified heroin dealer…One and the same.

Doctor gets 30 years to life for murders in L.A. case tied to patients’ overdoses

A Judge on Friday sentenced a Rowland Heights doctor to 30 years to life in prison for the murders of three of her patients who fatally overdosed, ending a landmark case that some medical experts say could reshape how doctors nationwide handle prescriptions.

The sentence came after a Los Angeles jury last year found Dr. Hsiu-Ying “Lisa” Tseng guilty of second-degree murder, the first time a doctor had been convicted of murder in the U.S. for overprescribing drugs.

Superior Court Judge George G. Lomeli said before sentencing Tseng that she had attempted to blame patients, pharmacists and other doctors rather than take responsibility for her own actions.

“It seems to be an attempt to put the blame on someone else,” he said. “Very irresponsible.”

Tseng, wearing blue jail scrubs, apologized to the victims’ families, her family and “medical society.”

“I’m really terribly sorry,” she said, before addressing the courtroom audience, which was crowded with victims’ relatives. “I have been and forever will be praying for you. May God bless all of you and grant comfort to all who have been affected by my actions.”

The 46-year-old former general practitioner is among a small but growing number of doctors charged with murder for prescribing painkillers that killed patients. A Florida doctor was acquitted of first-degree murder in September.

Some experts fear that Tseng’s conviction will usher in a precarious new reality – a scenario in which doctors fearful of prosecution are hesitant to prescribe potent painkillers to patients who need them.

Attorney Peter Osinoff, who represented Tseng before the state medical board, told the judge during Friday’s hearing that the doctor no longer represents a danger to society since she surrendered her medical license in 2012.

The trial had already had a “deterrent effect” on other doctors and has captured the medical community’s attention.

“More primary care physicians no longer accept or treat chronic pain patients in their practice,” he told the judge.

Outside the courtroom, Osinoff said Tseng’s prosecution has had a negative impact on physicians and patients.

“The doctors are scared out of their minds,” he said. “The pendulum has swung so far. The people who need [pain medication] can’t get it now.”

Other medical experts have echoed his concerns since Tseng was charged in 2012.

“When you use the word ‘murder,’” said Dr. Peter Staats, president of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, “of course it’s going to have a chilling effect.”

Staats said he believes an aggressive medical board – not prosecutors – should go after reckless doctors. But, he added, any doctor who is prescribing pills knowing that they are being abused or diverted shouldn’t be called a doctor.

“That’s not the practice of medicine,” Staats said.

Dr. Francis Riegler, a pain specialist who works in Palmdale, said he has followed Tseng’s case and talked about the prosecution with fellow doctors across the country.

“We agree,” he said, “that if you’re doing the right thing – if you’re one of the good guys, if you will – you don’t need to worry about being prosecuted for murder.”

During Tseng’s trial, Deputy Dist. Atty. John Niedermann told jurors that there were “red flags” in her prescribing habits.

More than a dozen times, the prosecutor said, a coroner’s or law enforcement official called with the same stark message: “Your patient has died.”

Her prescribing habits, Niedermann said, remained unchanged.

The prosecutor told jurors that Tseng wrote a man’s name on prescriptions so his wife could get twice as many pills, openly referred to her patients as “druggies” and sometimes made up medical records.

Her motivation, Niedermann said, was financial.

Between 2007, when Tseng joined the Rowland Heights clinic where her husband worked, and 2010, tax returns show that their office made $5 million, he said.

Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey said the conviction sent an unflinching message to medical professionals.

“In this case,” Lacey said, “the doctor stole the lives of three young people in her misguided effort to get rich quick.”

Tseng was convicted of murder for the deaths of Vu Nguyen, 28, of Lake Forest; Steven Ogle, 25, of Palm Desert; and Joey Rovero, 21, an Arizona State University student who prosecutors say traveled more than 300 miles with friends from Tempe, Ariz., to obtain prescriptions from Tseng at her Rowland Heights clinic.

The jury also found Tseng guilty on more than a dozen illegal-prescribing counts.

 

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2016 in American Genocide

 

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